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stryker

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Everything posted by stryker

  1. Maybe a bit premature, but it sounds like if the UK is serious about this, then the fantasy of a northern England bid from the likes of Birmingham and Manchester is a dead idea, and it should be. London can easily clear the field in a 2036 race unless there`s another strong bid from western Europe somewhere (the likes of Madrid, Rome, or Germany). I disagree with McKay`s assessment entirely. He`s still operating under the old line of thinking that based on continental rotation that 2036 would be Asia`s time. Even worse is he cites both Jakarta and Doha as credible alternatives when neither is. Unless the bid is coming from Korea (Seoul) there`s no threat to a London bid from Asia. In terms of how a London Olympics would look. The stadium is the plus. I also believe that McKay is misinformed on UK Athletics. I haven`t seen anything that suggests they are looking to leave the Olympic Stadium and it`s been discussed but West Ham is in no financial shape to purchase the stadium, let alone renovate it. A 2036 bid would just need a bit of tweaking as far as venues go. the new MSG Sphere could easily host boxing or perhaps taekwondo, judo, or wrestling. London ExCEL could host the IBC/and MPC. The aquatics center at 3,000 could host water polo while one of the city`s many football stadiums could acommodate a temporary pool for aquatics. Both Olympia and Alexandra Palace could host indoor events like badminton, table tennis, taekwondo. I`d envision gymnastics and the medal rounds for basketball back at the 02 with basketball prelims at the Copper Box. Volleyball and handball could easily be held in Birmingham if they want to bring in northern England somehow. As for an Olympic Village, this would be the biggest hurdle IMO, but surely somewhere in the Greater London area could use affordable housing or perhaps London could follow Birmingham`s lead for the CWGs and use existing housing from local universities for an Olympic Village.
  2. There was a $125 million renovation done at the end of the 2016 NBA season but it was largely to add additional luxury suites including floor suites along with expanding the concourses on both levels so I would assume the sight lines are still the same
  3. I'll be curious to see what a preliminary venue plan looks like. I'd suspect it will be almost identical to that of the 2002 WOGs with additional venues for the likes of ski orienteering and big air. The indoor ice events can all be in the same venues except for the secondary ice hockey venue (Peaks Ice Arena has since been converted into a community center) but McKay Events Center at Utah Valley State can easily fill that void. I could envision some jockeying for the Vivint Smart Arena (former Delta Center) between the IIHF and ISU given it's the largest indoor arena in the city and the Maverick Center at 10,000 might be considered too small for main events by the aforementioned federations.
  4. It's a government sponsored poll with questionable numbers and polling methods. In other words, it's likely the real public support numbers are nowhere as strong as Salt Lake. Officials in Sapporo even admitted going with a referendum was risky. Better for the IOC to tell Sapporo come back when your PR numbers are better (2034). Last thing the IOC needs is another Denver scenario.
  5. Also confirmed that boxing will remain at Roland Garros and not be moved to Hall 6 at Porte de Versailles.
  6. New Norm doesn't change the fact that Coates was a leader of an organization that awarded the most recent WOGs to a country committing genocide. That's a stain that neither he nor the rest of the IOC will ever live down.
  7. They were both around when the Olympics got too big, Sochi and Rio, not to mention the IOC's horrible PR image. Those reforms don't outweigh the mess. If this was a business, both of them would've been given pink slips a long time ago. Coates and Bach are examples of failed leadership. Both of them bear full responsibility for Sochi, Rio, Beijing 2022, the list goes on. Here's a lesson in leadership. The first of rule leadership: everything is your fault
  8. Good riddance. Both Coates and Bach should've been gone a long time ago. Both of them bear significant responsibility for the mess the IOC is in
  9. That's not entirely accurate. There's nothing that says the IOC cannot elevate more than one city to targeted status especially if Sapporo gets its act together (i.e. getting it's public support levels on solid footing)
  10. Google Maps is not always accurate. The link is old but the track has been closed since 2012. The closure of the Turin track has been one of the arguments for rebuilding the one at Cortina. 2006 Torino Olympic sliding track set to close due to high costs - Pique Newsmagazine
  11. The Sarajevo inclusion makes no sense when you have existing sliding tracks in France, Switzerland, and even the soon-to-be rebuilt one in Cortina that could handle sliding events for a prospective Spanish WOGs. My guess is they probably already when to the aforementioned countries and were told no.
  12. Agreed which is why a robust transportation system would need to be in place (both the Netherlands and Belgium come to mind as potential countrywide SOGs hosts). Even if it's less than ideal, countrywide bids are likely the only way you get the likes of Austria and Switzerland back in the mix for a WOGs.
  13. There would not be a further delay. The IOC would strip Dakar of the event if that happened.
  14. The IOC only pays lip service to the human rights issue. It has no bearing on them choosing an Olympics host. While the plight of the migrant workers in Qatar (and most of the Gulf) is horrifying, the fact the IOC has gone to China twice now including while their government is conducting a state-sponsored genocide program, tells me they wouldn't really pay much attention to the migrant worker issues in a hypothetical Qatar bid. I do agree that the secrecy and opaqueness of the host selection process is supposed to help the IOC clean up their PR image (though I've argued in another thread how it's only a half-hearted effort). Essentially I think the IOC had determined even with more flexibility and dialogue intending to keep costs down that only a handful of regions can actually host a SOGs logistically and keep costs under control. Those are the USA, Canada, Western Europe, Russia, China, Japan, Korea, and Australia. That eliminates all of Africa, South America, and most of Asia. If the process leads to a string of Olympics that come in at or under budget with viable legacies then the IOC's PR image might improve. Of course the opposite could also happen. It also affords the opportunity for the IOC to save face and cut bait with the likes of Doha before the host city selection process gets serious.
  15. Did you even read my post? I never said it was a passing phase. I clearly stated the New Norm does not require use of existing or temporary venues (again did you read?) It only encourages it. Surely with the amount of knowledge you have about Brisbane you should know that by now. There's nothing to prevent the IOC from accepting a bid that would splurge on costs or building shiny new venues that don't have clear defined legacies maybe not on a Sochi level. You are also forgetting the all important influence the respective sports federations have over venues (we saw this in Tokyo and we are seeing it now in Paris). Remember it's about money not legacy. If a candidate city can offer higher capacity venues meaning more tickets are sold which equals more money then it's going to have an advantage whether it aligns with the suggestions of the New Norm or not. Of course other factors come into play such as the weather in Doha,'s case.
  16. Under the New Norm, the IOC encourages the use of existing or temporary venues if possible but that is not mandatory. There's nothing to prevent a Sochi style splurge on a future Olympics especially from the likes of China,Istanbul, or India just to name few (all run by despots as well). As for legacy, well, it's easy to create a bogus legacy and the IOC will bite it hook, line, and sinker. Actually September is worse, at least it was in the UAE. October starts to see a sip in temperature but it is still hot. A hypothetical Qatar bid would likely have to be in November or December.
  17. Yes complete with remote controlled clouds to block out the sun just like they proposed for the WC. Yes this considered. The cooling technology to vastly lower temperatures to a safe level for competition in a place like Doha during the summer months isn't feasible. And it's not just the heat either. I'd argue the humidity is actually worse. I lived in Abu Dhabi for four years and summer humidity levels easily reach 80-90 percent especially in the early hours of the morning and evenings. I read the insidethegames editorial and it reminds me a lot of the talk right after South Africa hosted the WC. There was lots of chatter about how it set up South Africa perfectly to bid for an Olympics. Even the late Jacques Rogge said so. It's not possible for Doha and the IOC isn't going to go outside the hosting window and risk alienating NBC if they indeed re-sign for broadcasting rights. An Olympics in fall or winter would put them in direct competition with the likes of the NFL, European football, baseball and college football. That's a crowded sports calendar. Of note that I found eyebrow raising in the editorial was the fact that privately the Qataris were furious about the way Brisbane was selected which echos the response the DOSB had. Now that two countries have come out and said the process was opaque and in secret then I'd say it's fairly likely that's how it went down. One country or Olympic committee criticizing the process is one thing. Two makes it even more suspicious.
  18. It's not uncommon for IOC officials to visit sports facilities. I could see the visit going along the lines of "looks nice but figure out how to host a successful Commonwealth Games or Asian Games then we can talk." Even then, given India's horrid track record for completing infrastructure projects on time and on budget, I wouldn't get tok hopeful this sports complex gets done in the time they say it will.
  19. So now there's chatter about moving boxing from the covered court at Roland Garros to the exhibition hall at Porte de Versailles that was formerly set to host basketball prelims. Needless to say, the French Boxing Federation isn't happy about the idea. Seems ridiculous anyway. Why move boxing when the newly covered Suzanne Lenglen Court is more than adequate . . . unless there's other plans such as moving handball out of Lille so basketball prelims can be held there. Perhaps handball to the Suzanne Lenglen Court if that's even possible?
  20. This reminds me a bit of that person (can't remember if it was a politician or local businessman) who championed the idea of Tulsa hosting an Olympics.
  21. But are the First Nations communities going to be the ones putting up all the funding? No that will likely be done by the city of Vancouver which means tax payer dollars. I'm all for an indigenous led bid but it still has to be paid for.
  22. There's the start of a pattern here and one that has the potential to blow up spectacularly in the IOC's face if they are not careful. Referendums looked like near certainties for both Sapporo and Vancouver, two cities with tepid support at best for an Olympic bid. Now both cities are trying to skirt the dreaded referendum and for good reason. The track record of no votes speaks for itself. My guess is there's a hope that even with tepid support that once bid preparations get underway more public support will come. On the flip side and this comes with awarding an Olympics too far out . . . If a sizeable No Olympics crowd makes their voice heard with promises of punishing politicians at the ballot box who support an Olympic bid especially one without a public vote then there's a significant possibility of a repeat of what happened with Denver. It's be a nightmare if the IOC awarded Vancouver an Olympics then Hardwick gets elected mayor and announces she's giving them back.
  23. All of Africa is a non-starter. South Africa is on the verge of being a failed state with their economy coupled with last summer's riots. India is also a non-starter until they improve their track record of hosting multi-sporting events. Exhibit A of that failure is the much maligned 2010 CWGs. Had those been a success I think there'd be serious conversation about an Indian SOGs in the very near future. India also fell flat in their attempt to host the Asian Games (New Delhi lost to Incheon for the 2014 edition). Bottom line is if you cannot handle a CWGs or convince the OCA to award you an Asian Games then the Olympics are and should be a pipe dream for India. India needs to host a successful CWGs or Asian Games before thinking about an Olympics.
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