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About AustralianFan

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  1. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Annastacia Palaszczuk said a 2032 Queensland Olympics would be ‘the People’s Games’ https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/brisbane-olympic-stadium-stirs-ioc-questions/news-story/5f1d0df9594b6c7bf42e4ad3ab1f2928 By JACQUELIN MAGNAY LAUSANNE September 11, 2019 Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said a 2032 Queensland Olympics would be ‘’the People’s Games’’ and foreshadowed a golden age for the state as an Olympic bid took a giant leap amidst effusive praise from the International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach. Mr Bach used the word “impressive’’ at least six times about the Queensland 2032 plans when speaking to reporters on Tuesday evening and when questioned if there were sticking points the team needed to work on, he said simply: “no’’. Mrs Palaszczuk has even brought forward a final deadline about making a decision whether to bid for the Games. At the beginning of the week the plan was to decide by the end of the year, but yesterday she brought it forward by a month. Standing beside Mr Bach, Ms Palaszczuk said: “the expansive presentations of the International Olympic Committee has been beneficial (to help us understand) what we need to do to complete the value assessment as soon as possible. I would like to see it completed by the end of November.’’ She then added: “I would like to see these as the People’s Games, for the people and inclusive of our people’’. The Prime Minister’s Queensland Olympic Candidature Leadership group is due to meet in early December and could then sign off on the Olympic bid proposal as soon as it is passed by the Queensland government. If the bid proceeds, Queensland would work with the IOC’s Future Candidature Commission for the Summer Olympics to fine-tune their proposal. The announcement of who will be on this all-important commission is due to be announced next month. The commission will scrutinise the plans of Queensland and other interested bidders before putting together a recommendation to an IOC session of its 100 plus members, which could occur in 2021. Mr Bach said the questions from the Australian team were in-depth and showed a high level of preparedness, which was unusual, but which gave him confidence that a decision about the 2032 Olympics would be definitely made well before 2025. “My only advice is to keep going,’’ he said. “I must say its innovative to have all parties united and behind this big project and sport in Australia. “This shows this project is not only about the elite athletes and elite sport but about the communities and also informed the Queenslanders themselves are highly supportive of the project, if you add to this the enthusiasm for sport of which the Aussies are famous … I think it is fair to say this project has all the ingredients to become a successful candidature. So the ball is in your court now to digest all this information, to see what it means for you and make a good decision.’’ After the series of meetings which were held at the new Olympic headquarters in Lausanne Ms Palaszczuk was enthusiastic about the economic benefits and fast tracking of much needed transport infrastructure to South East Queensland that a Games would bring. Ms Palaszczuk said she was able to show the IOC that about 85 per cent of venues were already in place and could be used for a 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games. But one venue not yet decided on was the main stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies and athletics. She was also satisfied that the Olympic Movement and Queenslanders shared common values about opportunities for young people, the environment and sustainability. Crucially the IOC also confirmed they would be contributing around $2.5bn to the operating Games budget that is projected to be $5.3bn. “I believe we share common values and the ideals and values of the Olympic Movement,’’ Ms Palaszczuk said. “The pride that (a 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games) will bring to Queensland and across our nations as well, it could be a golden age for Queensland and it sets Queensland’s future up with jobs and investment for decades to come.’’ Mr Bach said he was happy to have met “optimistic and forward looking politicians’’. “That was a very good experience,’’ he noted. Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates said the exchange was both successful and a critical next step for Queensland. “Across a range of critical areas, the delegation gained vital insights into the IOC’s thinking about what a Games candidature looks like and how the IOC’s vision for the Game can align with Queensland’s vision for the state’s future,’’ he said. “The overwhelming message the Queensland team can take home is that putting together a viable candidature is very much a partnership between the potential host and the IOC. “The IOC team could not have been more helpful in providing expert insight into where the Olympic movement is heading, how the Olympic sports program works, Games funding and the risks and opportunities Queensland should consider.’’ Mr Coates said it was useful for all delegation members to hear first-hand the IOC’s focus on reducing costs, reducing complexity, risk and waste. “I think we all understand that the Queensland community must be kept informed and engaged throughout the process ahead,’’ Mr Coates said. “The warmth and welcoming attitude of the Queensland people is a wonderful asset. “To have the united leadership at federal, state and local government level sends a powerful signal. The delegation showed great unity of purpose and demonstrated that Queensland can make a compelling case. “Today’s exchange of information will certainly help strengthen that case, should Queensland decide to proceed with a candidature,” Mr Coates said.
  2. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    NEW 80,000-SEAT BRISBANE STADIUM TO BE CENTREPIECE OF 2032 OLYMPICS BID Australian Leisure Management https://www.ausleisure.com.au/news/new-80000-seat-brisbane-stadium-centrepiece-of-olympics-bid/ September 11, 2019 Plans for an 80,000 capacity Olympic stadium in Brisbane have been revealed as the centrepiece of a Queensland bid for the 2032 Games. The stadium, which would host the athletics and opening and closing ceremonies of a south east Queensland Games, features as part of a 2032 Olympics and Paralympics masterplan that included two athletes villages - one in Brisbane and the other on the Gold Coast - a faster rail network linking the region and a second M1 Highway between the Gold Coast and Brisbane. Potential locations for the new venue include the RNA Showgrounds, QEII Stadium at Nathan, the Mayne Rodd Rail Yards at Bowen Hills and Albion Park. The plans were announced as an Australian delegation that included Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates and Star Entertainment Group Chairman John O’Neill met with International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach in Switzerland overnight. Premier Palaszczuk told IOC executives that Queensland would stage a “safe and welcoming” Games. Speaking to Bach she advised “we will provide a safe and welcoming Games, … there is no other place like Queensland on the planet.’’ In a new approach to for bids to host the Games, Bach has invited host cities and nations to develop plans with the IOC executive to work out whether bid are feasible. Bach has previously advised that he wants “very few losers’’ from the new bidding process. If Queensland’s pitch impresses the IOC, it will proceed on its final bid, which will go before the IOC just before the Tokyo Olympics in July next year before a final decision by 2022.
  3. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Government Decision To Pursue Queensland 2032 Olympic Bid Possible By December Posted on Sep 17, 2019 1:13 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said that her government should have what it needs to determine whether to move forward with Australia’s Olympic bid by December this year. She told the Brisbane Times Tuesday that a proposal and feasibility study funded in part by the federal government should be delivered before the end of the year, and in time for the cabinet to consider the results. But Palaszczuk warned that if the findings weren’t positive for the region, she would abandon the project. “If the Games do not offer real benefits to this state then, of course, we will not pursue them,” she said. Bid promoters hope to leverage a potential USD $1.8 billion (AUD $2.6 billion) investment from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) combined with existing venues from across Queensland to host a cost-neutral Games. In return, it is hoped the region will be able to hasten the development of much-needed transportation infrastructure upgrades and create new jobs and private investment. “If it delivers these things sooner than they would otherwise, then so much the better,” she said. “This is not just about a couple of weeks of competition. It is about accelerating decades’ worth of jobs investment. “It’s about getting things off the drawing boards and into our lives,” she said, according to the Brisbane Times. Palaszczuk led a high-level Australian delegation that traveled to IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland last week to meet IOC President Thomas Bach and site selection officials to discuss a possible bid. Both sides reported positive results from the preliminary meeting. “We clearly have the attention of the International Olympic Committee,” Palaszczuk said. Along with transport upgrades, the bid bid team will need to identify an Olympic Village for athletes staying in state capital Brisbane, as well as develop plans to construct a nearby stadium that can seat at least 60,000 spectators at Games time. The Queensland bid, expected to be led by Brisbane if plans move forward, is already considered a strong favorite to be elected to host the Games in 2032. Plans to open the race in 2023 were dropped in June when the IOC voted to change bidding rules and open a dialog with interested cities immediately. In the past, host cities were chosen seven year in advance, but now a host can be elected at any all-members session. Queensland could face rivals on the International stage including from India, Indonesia, China and jointly between North and South Korea. Last week IOC President Thomas Bach said that he was “confident” a bid from Germany could be organized to pursue the Games in 2032 or 2036.
  4. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Refer above IOC John Coates last week (quoted above) saying that a Brisbane Olympics does not need an 80,000 seat stadium.
  5. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    I agree that commentary about Melbourne is futile since they are not bidding, However, I think Brisbane / South East Queensland is clearly the frontrunner and could be awarded the Games as early as next year.
  6. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    IOC President Bach Says Australia’s 2032 Olympic Bid Could Be Elected Early Posted on Sep 10, 2019 6:44 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach warmly welcomed delegates representing Queensland Australia’s 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games bid Tuesday as the yet-confirmed bid was soft launched among top officials. Leaders presented what they claim to be efficient plans that would leverage 85 percent existing facilities across South East Queensland to stage the events. By investing the expected USD $1.8 billion (AUD $2.6 billion) contribution by the IOC derived from broadcast and sponsorship revenues, it is hoped the Games would help deliver necessary transportation upgrades across the region and an 80,000 seat Olympic Stadium in State Capital Brisbane. To complement an existing Olympic Village that was built for the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast last year, another complex to house Olympic Athletes would be developed in Brisbane should the city be chosen to host the Games. The high-level bipartisan group that traveled to IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland was led by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palazczuk and included Federal MP Ted O’Brien who represented the Prime Minister and Mayor Mark Jamieson who represented the South East Queensland Council of Mayors. Palaszczuk received criticism from political rivals at home due to her travel while deadly bush fires ravage parts of Queensland, but her defenders claimed this meeting was critical for the bid that could benefit the region for generations. Instead, Palaszczuk cancelled her meeting in Paris with the 2024 Olympic organizing committee so she could return to Australia two days early. Palazczuk dined one-on-one with President Bach for lunch Tuesday, discussing bid plans that are strongly supported cross-party by all relevant governments in Australia, and by taxpayers according to recent polls. “This is not only impressive, but at this early stage innovative to have all parties united behind this Olympic project and behind sport in Australia,” Bach said. “The ball is in your court,” he said, “to digest this information and to see what it means for you and then to take a sound decision.” Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President John Coates, who also serves as IOC Vice President, echoed Bach’s sentiment. “The overwhelming message the Queensland team can take home is that putting together a viable candidature is very much a partnership between the potential host and the IOC.” “The IOC team could not have been more helpful in providing expert insight into where the Olympic movement is heading, how the Olympic sports program works, Games funding and the risks and opportunities Queensland should consider. “There’s a strong recognition of Australian expertise and the considerable benefits that a Queensland Games could deliver,” Coates said, adding that Bach’s words amounted to a strong endorsement by the IOC. Indicating that he was impressed, Bach’s remarks also made clear that the 2032 bid is Queensland’s to lose should the region choose to move forward with a campaign. He confirmed that if the Australian project was in place, the IOC would be in a position to elect the bid sooner than seven years before the Opening Ceremony (2025), a mark that has been typical in past bids. In June the IOC dramatically reformed the bid process making the timetable flexible, and opening the doors to multi-city and regional bids – the latter allowing the campaign from Queensland instead of a more concentrated and costly effort by Brisbane alone. The resulting efficiencies have led organizers to believe they can deliver a cost-neutral Games – a bold claim following the era where most Games suffered from huge cost over runs. Australia’s bid emerged as an early favorite this year after Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged AUD $10 million (USD $6.85 million) towards developing plans, claiming the expense was warranted even if the IOC doesn’t choose Australia to host the Games. Queensland could face rivals on the International stage including from India, Indonesia, China and jointly between North and South Korea.
  7. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Queensland does not need new 80,000-seat Olympics stadium: Coates by Felicity Caldwell, Brisbane Times, 11:30am September 11, 2019 https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/queensland/queensland-does-not-need-new-80-000-seat-olympics-stadium-coates-20190911-p52q69.html Queensland does not need to build a new 80,000-seat stadium to host a successful Olympic Games, the committee's bosses in Switzerland have been told. Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates was part of a delegation invited to discuss to Lausanne, Switzerland, this week to discuss a potential Queensland bid for the Olympics in 2032. Mr Coates said there was no requirement for a new 80,000-seat stadium in Brisbane, arguing a smaller venue could be built. "The maximum is 60,000, that's what's been provided in Tokyo, that's what London provided," he said. "And that could be a stadium that could reduce to a lesser amount afterwards, depending on what the legacy is going to be - no requirement for 80,000." For the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020, Japan is building a 68,000-seat stadium with a capacity of more than 80,000 using temporary seating. The London Stadium was able to host 80,000 spectators for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics but reopened in July 2016 as the home of West Ham United with 66,000 seats. Asked if Queensland could therefore use an existing stadium, Mr Coates admitted a new facility would need to be built, saying "there isn't a stadium, to my mind". "I think there'll be something developed for athletics and the ceremonies, there is an option with the Gabba," he said. "But probably, I think, a new stadium has to be prepared, but similar to the way that it was done with London, it could reduce to something afterwards. "The days of 80,000, the days of 115,000 for Sydney is not required." Mr Coates said the Olympic Games could provide a boost to Australian sport. "Australian sport needs another impetus; it's 32 years since we had the Games and we know what an impetus that was across a whole range of sports," he said. "Increased participation, there'll be venues, the venues that have been talked of, the new ones, they're all community venues that will be created in the most part, before the Games, they'll be used by communities, they'll be transformed for the Games and then they'll go back to the communities afterwards." Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said Queensland had 85 per cent of the venues required to host an Olympic Games in 2032. Ms Palaszczuk said she hoped a value assessment for the Games could be done by the end of November. International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described the meeting with the Australian delegation as "excellent and very fruitful". "We are even more impressed than I was already during my recent visit in Brisbane and Queensland when we could see how advanced the preparations were already at the time," he said. "We have seen further progress here today when the project has been presented. "This project has all the ingredients to become a successful candidature." Ms Palaszczuk plans to fly back to Queensland earlier than expected to deal with the bushfire crisis. Earlier this year, it was revealed an Olympic Games could be hosted in Queensland with a cost-neutral impact. The Council of Mayors previously investigated a multi-city bid for the Olympic Games with events across Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast, the Gold Coast, Ipswich, Toowoomba, Redland, Moreton Bay and Logan instead of the traditional single-city bid.
  8. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Australia’s Bid Hopes To Make “The Greatest Pitch The Olympic Movement Has Ever Seen” Posted on Sep 6, 2019 12:19 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids Australia’s bid to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032 will take its pitch to Lausanne, Switzerland next week for key meetings with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the organization’s new headquarters. Federal Member of Parliament Ted O’Brien will represent the Prime Minister as part of the delegation that, he says, will spend much of the time listening to the IOC to lay the groundwork for a Southeast Queensland bid to host the Games in Australia for a third time. “I want to ensure we’re gleaning every possible insight from the IOC so we can put together the greatest pitch the Olympic Movement has ever seen,” O’Brien told Australian Associated Press. Led by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, the multi-partisan team hopes to show that Australia is united behind plans to host the Games. “The fact we wear different political stripes just goes to show how serious we are about working together,” O’Brien said. Southeast Queensland Council of Mayors (SEQ) representative Mark Jamieson will also join the delegation that plans to meet with representatives of the Paris 2024 organizing committee and the International Paralympic Committee. He claims the Games costs will not be a burden to taxpayers after the promised financial contribution by the IOC, and plans to use existing venues across the broad region. He believes the Games could even generate a small surplus. “We can use existing facilities. Clearly some need upgrades and we do need some new investment in others to deliver what’s required for the Games. But this is one of the fastest growing places in the country,” Jamieson told the Brisbane Times. Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President and IOC Vice President Jim Coates has been encouraging the bid, but also insisted that plans should only move forward if the region commits to necessary transport upgrades and puts them in place by 2032. These are already part of long-term development plans. Coates was the architect behind the IOC’s recently redesigned bid process that allows for regional bids with an emphasis on using existing venues to keep costs low. However general infrastructure projects to support the Games, including those for transportation upgrades that are needed even without the Games, have caused major cost over runs while planning recent Olympics as projects faced the added pressure of delivering within a set time box. Australia’s bid emerged as an early favorite this year after Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged AUD $10 million (USD $6.85 million) towards developing plans, claiming the expense was warranted even if the IOC doesn’t choose Australia to host the Games. Queensland could face rivals on the International stage including from India, Indonesia, China and jointly between North and South Korea. Under new bidding rules unveiled in June that drop the strict scheduling around the process, the race for all future Games including 2032 has now opened. New future Games commissions for both Summer and Winter editions will liaise with all interested cities and select qualified bids when the timing makes sense. Former rules would have seen the 2032 host city chosen in 2025 but Coates has hinted that the selection could now happen as early as next year.
  9. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    It looks to be a Brisbane/South East Queensland bid that is being organised for the 2032 Games, which includes the Gold Coast. They may well utilise venues in other parts of Queensland and other states?
  10. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Yes the Sydney Athletics Centre served as a warmup track for the Sydney 2000 Olympics (but there was no third track).
  11. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    July 23, 2019 08:15am by Toby Crockford https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/premier-orders-10-million-study-into-potential-2032-olympic-games-bid-20190723-p529py.html Premier orders $10 million study into potential 2032 Olympic Games bid A $10 million state government study will crunch the numbers on a potential south-east Queensland bid to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the new inquiry would build on research already conducted by the south-east Queensland council of mayors into a potential bid from the region. The study will examine potential venues, infrastructure that would need to be prioritised, as well as the funding required and where it would come from. "This could be the greatest thing that has ever happened in Queensland," Ms Palaszczuk said. “When we join together, we’re unstoppable. Imagine all levels of government, business and the community united behind the single goal of a Queensland Olympics. "There are many benefits to hosting these games but I want to make sure we know the costs as well." Ms Palaszczuk said the study's cost would largely be delivered in-kind by current staff and resources and matches the $10 million provided by the federal government. The Queensland premier said the International Olympic Committee's decision to allow a bid from a region rather than a city was "game-changer". However, the prime minister’s representative for the 2032 Olympic Games, Ted O’Brien, said he was sceptical of the state government's move. "While I welcome Queensland’s commitment to match the Commonwealth’s $10 million to investigate a bid, the Palaszczuk government needs to join the federal government and local SEQ mayors backing the bid 100 per cent," he said. "Prime Minister Scott Morrison has made it clear he’s in, boots and all, and the reservations of the Queensland government puts at risk our ability to secure first-mover advantage ahead of rival bidders." "We need to show the IOC exactly how much SEQ is embracing this golden opportunity. I’ll be seeking to contact Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk today to discuss the bid."
  12. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    Morrison encourages Qld govt to 'get all in' on Olympics bid https://www.skynews.com.au/details/_6058738309001 13/07/2019|2min Prime Minister Scott Morrison has sung the praises of Queensland at the state's LNP convention in Brisbane on Saturday, encouraging its 2032 Olympics bid. The Prime Minister has told the party faithful that 'Queensland is capable of achieving anything', and while the Sydney Olympic Games were the 'greatest games ever', Queenslanders 'will not let that stand'. The state government also came under fire, accused of dragging its heels, with Mr Morrison announcing it's 'time for the Queensland government to get all in on this bid'. As part of his push to back a 2032 Queensland Olympic Games, the Prime Minister nominated Sunshine Coast federal MP Ted O'Brien to build the bid.
  13. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    IOC President Bach Impressed By Australian PM’s Commitment To Olympic Bid Posted on 1 July, 2019, 11:51 AM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids Australia’s bid to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Queensland received high-profile support on a powerful stage Sunday in Japan. On the sidelines of the G20 Summit being held in Osaka, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison met with International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach and Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President and IOC Vice President John Coates met to discuss the fledgling bid led by Queensland state capital Brisbane. Morrison, who’s government committed AUD $10 million towards preparing an Olympic bid said Sunday “A Brisbane Olympics has the potential to be a game-changer for southeast Queensland and my government will be there every step of the way,” according to The Australian. “Just like in Sydney, a Queensland Olympics, led by Brisbane, would be an economic and job boom and would show off the entire state to the world. “The Sydney Olympics set a new standard for the Olympic Games and the IOC still praise its success almost 20 years later. I have no doubt that Queenslanders, in true Origin spirit, would want to go one better in Brisbane in 2032 and show the world ‘how good is Queensland’. “But to achieve this, we all have to work together and show we are a united team, especially governments at commonwealth, state and local level.” Bach was invited to the G20 meeting by Japan’s Prime Minster Shinzo Abe where the 2020 edition of the Olympics will be held in Tokyo. It marked the first time an IOC President has addressed the powerful summit. Later, Bach said “I was impressed by the clear and strong level of commitment of Prime Minister Scott Morrison and his government for Olympic Games in Queensland, Australia.” “He made it very clear that Olympic Games would fit 100 per cent into his government’s ten years infrastructure planning. This early commitment and the well-known enthusiasm of the Aussies for sport are a great foundation for the Olympic Games 2032 in Queensland.” While still early in the bid process, new bidding rules approved by the IOC last week stipulate that a host city or region could be elected at any time – putting new pressure on any cities that have been considering a shot at the 2032 edition. Bids being mulled by other places including Jakarta in Indonesia, Germany, Shanghai in China, India and jointly between North and South Korea – that have until now been contemplating a 2023 application deadline – face new pressures to ramp up their projects quickly. Coates said last month that the Australian bid could be considered for election as early as next year, though Bach later commented that that timeline is too aggressive. Bach said “for sure there will be no election for 2032 this year and at this moment in time I can also not see it for next year.” Coates said Sunday ““The Prime Minister made it very clear that he was enthused by what he heard at the meeting and that the Federal Government was ready to move forward.” “Thomas Bach conveyed the new flexible approach the IOC has adopted to create a dialogue with potential Games’ hosts and for Games to be hosted in several cities or regions. There’s no question a Games could be held in Queensland that suits this model. “We have significant existing sports infrastructure across multiple locations in South East Queensland,” Coates added, naming locations such a Townsville and Cairns that could host preliminary events. But he cautioned against a model that is too widespread. “President Bach warned against spreading events too far, being mindful of comments from the athlete Members of the IOC, who are concerned about the loss of the magic for athletes from all 206 National Olympic Committees, coming together,” Coates explained. “There needs to be sufficient accommodation for not only the teams but also technical officials, media and spectators, as well as additional broadcasting costs having to be considered.” Coates outlined a plan to move forward with the bid quickly, including the formation of the leadership group, the completion of an economic feasibility study by the Queensland Government and finalization of the competition venue masterplan. “There is no doubt [government leaders] understood President Bach’s message that the Games will pay for themselves, based on the IOC’s contribution of at least AUD $2.5 billion, ticket sales revenue and national sponsorships and licensing.”
  14. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    South-East Queensland's push to host the Olympics just got a little easier By Tara Cassidy - ABC News, Australia: 27 June, 2019 CREDIT: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-27/queensland-olympic-games-bid-just-got-easier/11257178 The odds of South-East Queensland becoming host to an Olympic Games has been given a boost overnight, due to an overhaul of the Olympic Games bidding process. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) approved key changes to electing future Olympic and Paralympic Games hosts at a session in Lausanne, Switzerland last night, allowing regions and countries to bid for the event. In the past only individual cities have been able to apply. The move is well timed for South-East Queensland's bid to host the 2032 Olympics. The changes will also see the end of the requirement to determine a Games host seven years prior to the event. IOC president Thomas Bach said the driving force that pushed the changes over the line was "the gap in public support". Many taxpayers worldwide hold the view that holding the two-week sporting spectacle is too expensive a luxury. In turn, changes were made to improve the attractiveness of hosting a games, by easing the bidding process and becoming less costly. 'It's a massive boost' Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said he supported the new process, which not only strengthens South-East Queensland's chances of hosting a games, but increases the financial viability of bidding for many regions. "The announcement by the AOC overnight is really positive, it's a massive boost, there's no doubt about it," he said. "In the past the cost in bidding and hosting an Olympic Games were far higher. Previously, candidates applying to host the 2018 and 2022 Winter Games spent in excess of $40 million, compared with the $7-10 million spent by each candidate of the 2026 games. According to the Australian Olympic Committee, such prices will continue to be reduced. Two permanent future Host Commissions for both summer and winter games will also be set up to oversee interest of potential bidders, assess feasibility and make recommendations on applications. Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates said the commissions would "not necessarily wait until interested hosts come to the IOC, but will be pro-active and open minded to innovative proposals". Mr Coates said the IOC signing off on the changes was one of the most "significant milestones", in 123 years of the modern Olympics. "The Olympic Charter has now been changed to allow candidatures from multiple cities, from regions and countries, focused around existing sports venues," he said. "Instead of a single Olympic village, there can be Olympic villages to ensure that athletes are accommodated in close proximity to their competition venues. "Priority must be given to the use of existing or temporary venues, the construction of new permanent venues for the purpose of the Games will only be considered if a sustainable legacy can be shown," Mr Coates said. Queensland Major Events Minister Kate Jones said while the benefits of hosting an Olympic Games shouldn't be underestimated, it would need national support from the public and all levels of government. "This is significant, however, when you're looking at the largest sporting event in the world, you absolutely need the support of the Federal Government as we know this would involve significant investment," she said "Queensland is different to other states where we have more people living outside of the capital city than any other state, so that's why any major event that we host has to benefit regional Queensland as well." Earlier this year, the Council of Mayors (SEQ) said it would consider a multi-city bid for the 2032 games with events across Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast, Ipswich, Moreton Bay, Logan, Redland and Toowoomba.
  15. AustralianFan

    Brisbane 2032

    IOC Vice President Hints 2032 Olympic Games Could Be Awarded In 2020, And To Australia Credit: Posted on Gamesbids.com By Robert Livingston June 13, 2019 11:14 am in Featured, Future Summer Bids International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President John Coates hinted Thursday that the 2032 Olympic Games could be awarded as early as next year, in 2020 – and he’s pushing for Brisbane in Australia to be named host. “The election by the IOC of the host for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games would normally be taken “seven years before” that is, in 2025,” Coates, who serves as President of the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC), told the Future Tourism Forum in Brisbane. “However, if proposed changes to the Games host election process are approved in 12 days’ time and there is a candidate ready to put its hand up, this election could be as early as the IOC Session in Tokyo next year before the opening of the Games on 24 July.” Coates leads an IOC working group tasked with reforming the Olympic bid process, and last month his proposals were approved by the IOC Executive Board and will be put to a final member vote at a Session in Lausanne on June 25. A key component of the new proposal is to remove the timing requirement from the Olympic Charter mandating the election of the host city seven years prior to the scheduled opening of the Games. Instead, “election timings are to be flexible and adjusted to local opportunities, context and needs,” Coates said Thursday. His comments have led local media to believe that Australia has the inside track to host the 2032 Games. Coates was one of the key architects of the recent double-allocation of the Games to Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028, the latter being awarded eleven years ahead of the first scheduled event. The IOC Vice President played up Australia’s chances for 2032, trying to convince politicians and stakeholders to jump at the opportunity. “Australia and Queensland have the proven capability to host major sports events, including the Olympic and Commonwealth Games,” he said. “The 2032 Olympic Games is there to win. I hope you will give it serious consideration.” To back up his enthusiasm, Coates pointed to favorable public support, existing infrastructure and a suitable Winter climate in Queensland that will enable the Games to take place in the required July and August time frame. He said the proposal was also cost effective when taking into account the USD $1.8 billion contribution from the IOC towards the operational budget. A recent poll commissioned by the South-East Queensland Council of Mayors revealed that more than 74 percent of people believe a SEQ Olympic bid would accelerate the delivery of transport infrastructure. Seventy-five per cent said they were likely to back an Olympic bid if it meant major transport upgrades would be delivered. “The SEQ Mayors embarked on an investigation of an Olympic Games with the belief that it would catalyse all levels of government to address the lack of transport investment in the region, and create a firm deadline to ensure it’s delivered,” Brisbane Mayor Cr Schrinner said according to MyGC.com.au. “The Council of Mayors (SEQ) is supportive of an Olympic Games only on the basis it delivers regional connectivity for the residents, businesses and visitors of SEQ. Both the SEQ Mayors and the community believe fast rail is key to fixing the region’s transport and congestion issues.” Coates has said in the past that transport upgrades must already be planned before an Olympic bid could move forward. But in the past, such major infrastructure projects that are time-boxed for Olympic Games delivery have been prone to major cost overruns, scope issues and delays. This has been seen while preparing for recent Games in PyeongChang, Rio de Janeiro and Sochi – among others. The IOC lauded Games concepts from Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028 because plans did not include any Games specific transportation projects. However, a planned high speed rail project between the International Airport and Central Paris that was promised for the Games has been fraught with delays and will not be delivered by 2024. Many nations have already expressed interest in bidding for the 2032 Games including Indonesia, China, India, Germany and jointly between North and South Korea. Some of these nations have launched plans based on the expectation that the Games would be awarded in 2025.
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