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AustralianFan

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AustralianFan last won the day on February 2

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About AustralianFan

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  1. From CNN: “It was also announced that the event will still be dubbed Tokyo 2020 despite the postponement.“ https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/24/sport/olympics-postponement-tokyo-2020-spt-intl/index.html
  2. Tokyo Summer Olympics postponed From CNN:https://edition.cnn.com/world/live-news/coronavirus-outbreak-03-24-20-intl-hnk/h_fe56d8bf28e390da5803c0b77ba478ce Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he has reached an agreement with International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach to postpone the Olympics for about one year. Summer 2021 is the latest that these Olympics could be held, Abe said.
  3. Since Euro 2020 was recently postponed to 2021 before the Tokyo Olympics were, the IOC will not want to have both postponed events clashing in any way, as it was in 2020. The IOC and the Japanese Organisers will want football, one of the Olympic Games biggest sports and drawcards, to be fully competing at the Games.
  4. Japanese PM Shinzo Abe has just announced the IOC has agreed to postpone the Games until 2021.
  5. Correction: Tokyo 2021 The IOC will most likely have to talk with the football governing bodies and both be formally on the same page for Euro 2021 and Tokyo 2021, as they were in 2020 and every other Summer Olympics/Euro year. The IOC will want to very much keep football in Tokyo 2021. The proximity of the 2022 Winter Olympics is also not going to be a primary consideration I would think in scheduling Tokyo 2021. Its just going to be one of those periods in Olympic history that both Summer and Winter Games were held close together out of necessity due to the 2020 pandemic.
  6. The IOC will most likely have to talk with the football governing bodies and both be formally on the same page for Euro 2021 and Tokyo 2921, as they were in 2020 and every other Summer Olympics year. The IOC will want to very much keep football in Tokyo 2021. The proximity of the 2022 Winter Olympics is also not going to be a primary consideration I would think in scheduling Tokyo 2021. Its just going to be one of those periods in Olympic history that both Summer and Winter Games were held close together out of necessity due to the 2020 pandemic.
  7. According to the following 2026 news report, the 1964 Cauldron will be used again in 2020.
  8. The existing cauldron tower certainly was used for the first 2 LA Olympic Games with the opening ceremony crowd flanking it. i think though with the Opening Ceremony crowd and all the action at the new stadium, it will be hard to have the main Cauldron at a different location (LA Memorial Coliseum) to the main Opening Ceremony location.
  9. Ok, a stunning new Cauldron lit in the Stadium and the original 1964 Cauldron also lit somewhere else in Tokyo?
  10. The LA 2028 Olympic Opening Ceremony will be held at the new Los Angeles Stadium with a simultaneous event held at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Will the organisers have only the original Cauldron at the LA Memorial Coliseum ignited, or will they light a new design Cauldron at the new Los Angeles Stadium, or light both?
  11. Stade de France I assume will host the 2024 Opening Ceremony and witness the lighting of the Cauldron. What might Paris do for the Cauldron to ignite their 3rd Olympic Games?
  12. Brisbane Olympic bid is our chance to stop funding decline: Coates Credit: By Georgina Robinson, February 19, 2020 — 4.56pm Brisbane Times: https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/sport/rugby-union/brisbane-olympic-bid-is-our-chance-to-stop-funding-decline-coates-20200219-p542ee.html Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates says a successful bid to host the 2032 Olympics would be the "whack" required to reverse a long-term slide in funding for Olympic sports. Coates said the obesity epidemic was also a strong argument for continued government funding of Olympic sports, but the veteran AOC boss acknowledged there was nothing like a home Games to capture the attention of politicians. "It's the whack, no doubt about that, and that's something the Prime Minister acknowledges and would be ready for," he said. "I think there is still a justification for increasing funding based on the health and wellbeing of an active nation and all of those things ... government has to address obesity and other health issues ... and that's a message that the AOC keeps impressing upon them." Coates was speaking at the launch of Think Again, the memoir of Australia's first and only deaf Olympic decathlete Dean Barton-Smith, who competed at the Barcelona Olympics in 1992. Coronavirus and fresh revelations of looming funding cuts dominated proceedings, with Coates sparking a fresh war of words with long-time rival and Australian Sports Commission chief John Wylie. The Australian Institute of Sport, which falls under Wylie's remit, has been in meetings with national sporting organisations about the future structure of high performance funding, with Australia's three-time gold medal-winning Hockeyroos one of the most high-profile teams under a funding cloud post-Tokyo. Government funding of high-performance sport has declined by 12 per cent in real terms since 2010 during a time in which Australia's results on the world stage have stuttered. Australia claimed a record 58 medals and finished fourth overall at the Sydney Olympics in 2000 but the nation has slowly slid down the ranks and settled for 10th at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro. In 2018 more than 40 current and former Australian athletes signed an open letter warning "high performance will inevitably transform into mediocrity" if sports are starved of Australian government funding, and AOC chief executive Matt Carroll followed up with calls for an extra $60 million each year. In the past three years the federal government has invested a total of $60 million in Tokyo preparations, while in last year's budget a further $54 million over two years was allocated to emerging high performance athlete pathways and athlete wellbeing and engagement. Neither Coates nor Wylie believe it is enough, but recent reporting on the cuts prompted Wylie to issue a public plea for unity and silence on the issue so close to the Games. Coates rejected the appeal, saying the issue deserved attention at any time in the Olympic cycle. "They seem to me to like mutterings of a man who has relevance deprivation, coming up with just six months to go," Coates said. "We've been critical of the fact that sports have had their funding reduced, we're critical of the funding criteria being just medals. Whether the government can redirect some money - I read that there's a pool of money there for the final run-up to Tokyo - so I hope that's wisely spent. "The difference I have with John Wylie in his piece is saying 'let's not talk about this til after the Games'. You need to be putting this to bed during this cycle so that you go straight into the next cycle and you don't lose six months. That's where I very much disagree with him and I've made that clear." The Queensland Government gave the go-ahead to a 2032 southeast Queensland bid late last year, and it must now develop a "candidature file" with its bid details, which would be presented to the IOC before the Tokyo Games next year. Coates reflected on Prime Minister Scott Morrison's pledge last year that the Government would not only support an Australian bid but build a long-term strategy around it. "We had a meeting on the side of [the G20] with our Prime Minister and Mathias Cormann and Prime Minister Morrison embraced the bid," Coates recalled. "He said 'the Commonwealth's behind this' but he also looked at [IOC president Thomas] Bach and said 'this is an opportunity for us to now plan long term and do something about a proper structure for sport and support for sport." Coates also said he was confident coronavirus posed no threat to the viability of the Tokyo Games.
  13. Key Findings of Value Proposition Assessment Credit: State Government of Queensland https://www.premiers.qld.gov.au/publications/categories/reports/assets/2032-olympic-paralympic-games-vpa.pdf Hosting the 2032 Games is feasible with financial and operational services support from all three levels of government. Organising Committee costs for the Olympic and Paralympic Games of $4.45 billion could be delivered at no cost to the State, taking into account International Olympic Committee (IOC) contributions and domestic revenues. The quantifiable economic benefits for Queensland have been estimated at around $7.4 billion. In addition, there are a range of qualitative social and community benefits that the Games could deliver over a potential two-decade window of opportunity. The Games could have a positive impact on job creation, supporting around 130,000 direct jobs. In addition to direct jobs, there will be tens of thousands of indirect jobs supported by the Games including over 10,000 tourism induced jobs in the Games year alone. The tourism and trade opportunities the Games could deliver are significant. This includes an estimated uplift of around $20.2 billion in international visitor expenditure between 2020 and 2036 and increased export opportunities of up to $8.6 billion. In addition to whole-of-State benefits, regions outside of South East Queensland (SEQ) could also benefit from a range of opportunities, including: - Games hosting opportunities (Cairns, Townsville and the Whitsundays) - pre-Games training, Torch Relay and cultural festivals - increased visitor expenditure with around 50 per cent of international travellers dispersing to the regions (an uplift of approximately $10 billion) procurement and supply chain opportunities. A high percentage of Games venues - approximately 80 per cent - already exist or can be delivered through temporary overlay solutions. A number of options, aligned with long term sport and entertainment venue planning in Brisbane, continue to be explored for the Athletics and Ceremonies venue. Queensland’s climate and world-class facilities provide an ideal environment for elite athletes to train and perform at their best. The recent Olympic Agenda 2020, New Norm reforms provide a basis for Queensland to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in a way which reduces costs and ensures flexibility in delivery to the benefit of the host. The 2032 Games and the SEQ City Deal currently under development provide a catalytic opportunity for all three levels of Government to agree on key priorities including transport infrastructure projects. The next stage involves finalising the master plan, securing funding and operational service agreements with all levels of government and confirming the associated costs to the State.
  14. 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games Value Proposition Assessment Executive Summary Credit: State Government of Queensland https://www.premiers.qld.gov.au/publications/categories/reports/assets/2032-olympic-paralympic-games-vpa.pdf
  15. Queensland Olympics 2032 would create jobs and cash injection, government says Credit: Warren Barnsley , 7 News Tuesday, 11 February 2020 5:14 pm https://7news.com.au/news/qld/queensland-olympics-2032-would-create-jobs-and-cash-injection-government-says--c-691980 The Queensland government has shrugged off criticism of its 2032 Olympics push, touting hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of economic benefits. The state government has released its Value Proposition Assessment of hosting the Olympic and Paralympics Games in Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast. It claims $7.4 billion of quantifiable economic benefits have been identified, with the games creating 130,000 jobs. “In addition to direct jobs, there will be tens of thousands of indirect jobs supported by the Games including over 10,000 tourism induced jobs in the Games year alone,” said the report, released on Tuesday. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the games would be “jobs bonanza for all of Queensland, not just Brisbane”. “We’re taking it very seriously,” she said. “The economic benefits to the state are great.” One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has led the backlash leader to Queensland hosting the Olympics, labelling the push “irresponsible”. “We’re in dire straits in Queensland - the state government is in a $90 billion debt, we have townships running out of water,” the Queensland senator said last month. But the report claims the cost of hosting the games, estimated to be $4.45 billion, could be delivered at “no cost to the state, taking into account International Olympic Committee contributions and domestic revenues”.
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