Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. We’ll always have the 2015 Pan American Games I think it’s nice to see France try some different stuff with their Ceremonies.
  3. Yesterday
  4. Unidentified donor ready to donate millions for Hamilton to land 2026 Commonwealth Games Steve Milton https://www.thespec.com/sports/hamilton-region/opinion/2020/07/03/unidentified-donor-ready-to-donate-millions-for-hamilton-to-land-2026-commonwealth-games.html Someone out there believes, really believes, in the 2026 Commonwealth Games for Hamilton and is putting serious money where their mouth is ... or at least soon will be. The Spectator has learned that an as-yet-unidentified donor will provide a multimillion dollar endowment to seed a private-sector funding war chest to help bring the Games here. We don’t know who the donor is but we do know it’s a massive coup — both in hard economics and as a symbolic magnet for similar private sector donations — for the volunteer group mounting the 2026 bid. And it should resonate loudly with the public as the ‘reality’ stage of seeking the Games begins Monday morning at a city council committee meeting where the bid committee will open the official process of acquiring approval in principle for a 2026 bid. To respect the wishes of the donating company, which prefers to make its own formal announcement soon, the committee will not reveal the identity of the benefactor nor the size of the donation. But a spokesperson for Hamilton 2026 Commonwealth Games Bid Corporation confirmed that it is well into seven figures. The donation will go into a private sector trust fund, which Hamilton ’26 will unveil within two weeks. PJ Mercanti, of Hamilton ’26 which pivoted from the original bid for the centenary 2030 Games, says the committee is ecstatic about the first donation, “which demonstrates the private sector’s significant commitment to this game-changing community initiative. “The hope is that this new fund will also serve as a springboard to secure further investments. We can leverage this early momentum from other private sector and institutional partners who are committed to this Games effort.” The goal is for the fund to eventually hit $100 million in private sector contributions. It would be used to support not just sports but all aspects of the Games movement — including affordable housing and ‘wellness’ initiatives — but could be spent only if Hamilton actually gets the Games. ......
  5. I don't care you're replying to an old comment, but it's missing the point completely to lose the point of reference when that comment is made. Yes, Sapporo said they're interested in bidding. That was before the 2020 Olympics got postponed by a year and will cost Japan a huge sum of money. And it's far from a guarantee that next summer will go off so smoothly. So add all that up together and are we confident Sapporo is going to bid for the 2030 Olympics? Because now it's going to be a year later that they are done with Tokyo and a lot more money spent, so they may have reservations about spending billions more on another Olympics when a lot of Japanese citizens aren't so sure they want the first one to happen.
  6. So.. it doesn't matter.. this is a forum website, we all can reply even the comment will be like 2 years ago.. 2030 it is long time from this recent year that time Covid-2019 will be no more
  7. Salt Lake 2030 and Sapporo 2030 are officially competiyors for the bid to host the winter olympics, also Barcelone would like to bid too and Ukraine would like to compete the bid too but they no representative city yet.. But I like to see to bid are the loser cities like Almaty or Stockholm another shot for bidding to host the winter olympic games in thier respective cities
  8. You're replying to a post from September. A couple of things have happened with the world since then that perhaps might affect whether or not Sapporo is in the game for 2030.
  9. It is official Sapporo is in the game of bidding with Salt Lake for 2030 olympics (winter games) and Barcelona is rumored they to compete in the bid and Ukraine but no city selected as thier representative host for bidding for winter olympics
  10. I think a Mime inspiration mascot will be.. I believe it is kinda represents the French culture, even tho I am not a french.. just guessing too
  11. The French have this proclivity to do strange things with their ceremonies. And they like to do outdoor/"theatre in the streets." 1. weird Albertville 1992 ceremonies 2. Med Games 1993 - held lakeside, or by a beach in Languedoc-Rosillon. (There's a partial clip of that on UTube.) 3. this FIFA 1998 World Cup 4. Jeux de la Francophonie 2013 in Nice when the OC was held at the Place Messina (the public square) in Nice. I hope they don't f*ck up 2024 with their weirdness. Oh, well, Cirque du Soleil just filed for bankruptcy becuz all their shows in Vegas closed -- and of course NO TOURING shows either.
  12. Coates and Ser Miang set to return as IOC vice-presidents as Erdener and Samaranch prepare to step down Credit: InsideTheGames By Liam Morgan, Thursday, 2 July 2020 Australia's John Coates and Ng Ser Miang of Singapore are set to regain their positions as vice-presidents of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the organisation's virtual Session later this month. insidethegames understands Coates and Ser Miang are currently the only two candidates for the vice-presidential roles being vacated by Uğur Erdener and Juan Antonio Samaranch, whose terms will conclude at the July 17 Session. While the deadline is not until the day before the Session, it is thought unlikely others will come forward to challenge Coates and Ser Miang. Four candidates – Mikaela Jaworski of the Philippines, Ethiopia's Dagmawit Berhane, Belgian Pierre-Olivier Beckers-Vieujant and Gerardo Werthein of Argentina – have emerged for two vacancies on the IOC's Executive Board. The place of Ser Miang, who stood against Thomas Bach in the 2013 IOC Presidential election, on the Executive Board is up for grabs as he is moving up to vice-president. Seoul 1988 Olympic pole vault gold medallist and six-time world champion Sergey Bubka is leaving the ruling body as he has completed his maximum two consecutive four-year terms. Both Coates, head of the Australian Olympic Committee and chairman of the Tokyo 2020 Coordination Commission, and Ser Miang have previously served as vice-presidents. Coates is able to stand again after stepping down from the Executive Board for the minimum two-year period, while Ser Miang returned to the ruling body in 2016 following a three-year absence. Coates was a vice-president from 2013 to 2017 and is set to hold the role until 2024, when his term on the IOC is due to conclude. The Australian, who reached the age limit of 70 in May, had his term extended at last year's IOC Session in Lausanne in June "due to his important role as chair of the IOC Legal Affairs Commission". Ser Miang, the longstanding chairman of the IOC Finance Commission, served as an IOC vice-president from 2009 to 2013. He departed the Executive Board in 2013 after reaching the end of his term before returning in 2016. Ser Miang can remain an IOC member until he turns 80 as he was elected to the organisation prior to 1999. Coates and Ser Miang will replace Erdener and Samaranch, who were both elected vice-president four years ago. Erdener, President of World Archery and the Turkish Olympic Committee, and Samaranch, the son of the late former IOC President of the same name, can be re-elected to the IOC Executive Board after a minimum of two years. It seems likely that Samaranch will return, while Erdener could feasibly see out the last two years of his IOC membership – he is due to leave in 2024 – as a member of the Executive Board. An intriguing race for the two available Executive Board places has developed, culminating at the IOC's first virtual Session in just over two weeks' time. Jaworski has been an IOC member since 2013 and is part of several IOC Commissions, including the Tokyo 2020 inspection panel. Berhane joined the same year as Jaworski – both were elected at the same Session where Bach became President – and sits alongside her on the Paris 2024 Coordination Commission. The Ethiopian is also a member of the IOC Finance Commission and the group responsible for proposing officials for IOC membership. Belgian businessman Beckers-Vieujant chairs the Paris 2024 Coordination Commission and is vice-chair of the Coordination Commission for Los Angeles 2028. Werthein is head of the Digital and Technology Commission, was part of the working group that helped devise changes to the Olympic bidding process and led the Organising Committee for the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics in Buenos Aires.
  13. The 1994 World Cup still holds the record for highest attendance, and that was with only 24 teams before they expanded. So clearly it wasn't that horrendous. Yes, I know the stories about European fans used to travelling by train who found it a little tougher to get around. Did Brazil not have to deal with that? Russia? And I'm pretty sure fans will welcome the North American experience with open arms after dealing with a World Cup held in Qatar. So save the sanctimonious nonsense as if the US-Canada-Mexico bid wasn't an obvious choice for 2026 over Morocco. It'll be an outstanding World Cup. And remember with expansion comes the new group stage format. 1/3 of all the teams will only play 2 games, so travel is not likely to be a major concern.
  14. I think it will honestly be pretty horrendous for players and fans. The USSF only cares about stuffing it pockets with cash, so you can expect them to pick hosts by how much money they can make rather than making travel easy for the national teams and fans following their teams. On the flip side I can't wait to hear their explanation for how it is actually environmentally friendly to route a team 10,000 km in the group stage from Montreal to Los Angeles to New York to Houston.
  15. Last week
  16. That vid was uploaded in February of 2011. It's not indicative of much. Tutuapp 9apps Showbox
  17. I predict that the rooster may be the mascot Kodi nox
  18. That vid was uploaded in February of 2011. It's not indicative of much.
  19. The Hamilton 2026 Commonwealth Games bid committee has been given a September deadline by the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF) to secure necessary government support for the Games. In a letter addressed to the Canada’s bid for the Games, the CGF said that it has been working “exclusively with [Commonwealth Sport Canada (CSC)] on plans to […] The post Commonwealth Games Federation Sets September Deadline For Hamilton 2026 Games Bid appeared first on GamesBids.com. View the full article
  20. Its good to get creative. Its a good logo but perhaps I see your point about the Maltese Cross. The St John Ambulance logo features this prominently too. I guess some of the globally recognisable symbols and features of Queensland and/or Australia are long white sandy tropical beaches, surf, people having fun in the sun, the blue ocean, rainforests, the Glasshouse Mountains, the long skycraper/surf beach skyline of the Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast, koala bears, kangaroos, etc. Anyway, just some recognisable imagery which may help.
  21. I intend to do a different one incorporating Aboriginal motifs and designs, but here's a modernized take on a logo. To be fair, I guess it really doesn't scream Queensland (Especially South East Queensland) as much, but hey. The Maltese Cross (Which I guess isn't a Queensland thing) is inspired by the flag of the state, whilst the petal like shapes point inwards symbolizing the four corners of the world. It's also stylized in a sun to represent the state's nickname being the 'Sunshine state'.
  22. Postecoglou wants ‘legacy’ facilities from 2023 Women's World Cup Credit: Sydney Morning Herald By Vince Rugari July 1, 2020 — 11.42am Former Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou wants Australia's successful 2023 Women's World Cup bid to leave behind a concrete legacy, arguing that football has too often been left empty-handed after hosting major sporting events. Postecoglou declared the game was "headed in the right direction" in this country, endorsing the leadership of Football Federation Australia chairman Chris Nikou and chief executive James Johnson for making decisions in the best interests of the sport. That includes the A-League's pending transition to a winter season and extends to Australia's joint bid with New Zealand to host the next Women's World Cup, which ended a decade of political heartbreak with FIFA. But Postecoglou - who now coaches Japanese champions Yokohama F. Marinos - wants the triumph to lead to tangible outcomes for football when it comes to facilities and infrastructure. He said football was one of the most popular sports at the Sydney 2000 Olympics, but it was actually the AFL and cricket which benefited the most from the Games. Brisbane, where Postecoglou used to coach the Roar in the A-League, hosted seven men's football matches at the Olympics - but instead of a rectangular stadium being built, the Gabba was redeveloped, leaving an infrastructure gap for the round-ball code that still exists today. "It is significant for football, significant for Australia, it's going to be an unbelievable tournament. The Matildas are going great guns and hopefully they have a good crack at it," Postecoglou said on SEN Radio. "The only thing again is it's got to leave a legacy for our game because the Sydney Olympics football was the most participated sport and we got nothing out of it. "The [2015] Asian Cup, we won and literally the next day, life went on without football having any sort of a legacy. Even the achievement itself hasn't really left much of a legacy. "I know it's going to be a fantastic tournament because Australia always holds fantastic tournaments, but I hope it's significant for football in the long term - things like facilities, infrastructure, governments are buying into the game. I'm hoping that's going to be the most positive outcome at all." Postecoglou credited the 'As One' bid team, particularly FFA's Mark Falvo and Jane Fernandez, for their behind-the-scenes work in winning over FIFA powerbrokers. A critic of previous FFA administrations led by executives from other codes, he also expressed confidence in the game's current leaders and said he was a fan of the A-League's mooted switch from summer to winter. "I don't mind it. If the football people within our code think that's the best way to go then believe it and go for it," he said. "That's what I've always been critical of - we always look to outside sources to tell us where the game's best placed. Add to sho "The best decisions we can make are ones that we believe are going to be good for football and if that's a winter season, then back it, go for it. "I'm pretty impressed with what's happened in the last few weeks ... I'm a big rap, he's a mate of mine, of the chairman [Nikou] who's the best kind of chairman because he's fairly anonymous and just gets the work done. "I think James Johnson's a fantastic appointment, he's a football person. As long as they're making football decisions, I think they're headed in the right direction."
  23. Postecoglou wants ‘legacy’ facilities from 2023 Women's World Cup Credit: Sydney Morning Herald By Vince Rugari July 1, 2020 — 11.42am Former Socceroos coach Ange Postecoglou wants Australia's successful 2023 Women's World Cup bid to leave behind a concrete legacy, arguing that football has too often been left empty-handed after hosting major sporting events. Postecoglou declared the game was "headed in the right direction" in this country, endorsing the leadership of Football Federation Australia chairman Chris Nikou and chief executive James Johnson for making decisions in the best interests of the sport. That includes the A-League's pending transition to a winter season and extends to Australia's joint bid with New Zealand to host the next Women's World Cup, which ended a decade of political heartbreak with FIFA. But Postecoglou - who now coaches Japanese champions Yokohama F. Marinos - wants the triumph to lead to tangible outcomes for football when it comes to facilities and infrastructure. He said football was one of the most popular sports at the Sydney 2000 Olympics, but it was actually the AFL and cricket which benefited the most from the Games. Brisbane, where Postecoglou used to coach the Roar in the A-League, hosted seven men's football matches at the Olympics - but instead of a rectangular stadium being built, the Gabba was redeveloped, leaving an infrastructure gap for the round-ball code that still exists today. "It is significant for football, significant for Australia, it's going to be an unbelievable tournament. The Matildas are going great guns and hopefully they have a good crack at it," Postecoglou said on SEN Radio. "The only thing again is it's got to leave a legacy for our game because the Sydney Olympics football was the most participated sport and we got nothing out of it. "The [2015] Asian Cup, we won and literally the next day, life went on without football having any sort of a legacy. Even the achievement itself hasn't really left much of a legacy. "I know it's going to be a fantastic tournament because Australia always holds fantastic tournaments, but I hope it's significant for football in the long term - things like facilities, infrastructure, governments are buying into the game. I'm hoping that's going to be the most positive outcome at all." Postecoglou credited the 'As One' bid team, particularly FFA's Mark Falvo and Jane Fernandez, for their behind-the-scenes work in winning over FIFA powerbrokers. A critic of previous FFA administrations led by executives from other codes, he also expressed confidence in the game's current leaders and said he was a fan of the A-League's mooted switch from summer to winter. "I don't mind it. If the football people within our code think that's the best way to go then believe it and go for it," he said. "That's what I've always been critical of - we always look to outside sources to tell us where the game's best placed. Add to short "The best decisions we can make are ones that we believe are going to be good for football and if that's a winter season, then back it, go for it. "I'm pretty impressed with what's happened in the last few weeks ... I'm a big rap, he's a mate of mine, of the chairman [Nikou] who's the best kind of chairman because he's fairly anonymous and just gets the work done. "I think James Johnson's a fantastic appointment, he's a football person. As long as they're making football decisions, I think they're headed in the right direction."
  24. Interesting new post on youtube: 10 Hours of Chilean TV coverage of the 1991 Pan Am Games in Havana in 2 parts including coverage of the opening ceremony.
  25. New South Wales Bids For 2027 Netball World Cup source The NSW Government and Netball Australia have launched their bid to host the 2027 Netball World Cup in Sydney and regional NSW. Minister for Sport John Sidoti said the 2027 Netball World Cup bid campaign is now officially underway, as part of the NSW Government commitment to bid for 10 World Cups for the next decade. “After Sydney hosted a successful tournament here in 2015, the world’s best players could be on our shores once again in eight years, giving the Diamonds the best chance to win another World Cup gold medal in our backyard,” Mr Sidoti said. “Netball holds a unique position in the NSW sporting landscape with many outstanding role models leading to one of the highest participation rates and in both metro and regional areas.” The NSW Government’s vision for the 2027 Netball World Cup would see the majority of games played in Sydney Olympic Park at the Genea Netball Centre and the upgraded Ken Rosewall Arena. Regional NSW will also get to share in the action, with several of the pool games likely to take place in outer metro sporting hubs. Minister for Tourism Stuart Ayres said NSW’s major event reputation takes the 2027 Sydney Netball World Cup bid to another level. “This could be another coup for our State, not only for athletes and sporting fans but the wider NSW community, with the event to boost the local economy by an estimated $30.5 million,” Mr Ayres said. Netball Australia Chair Paolina Hunt said netball keeps people of all ages active and having the best players in NSW for a World Cup will provide an incredible incentive for the next generation of elite netballers. “In NSW, netball is flourishing with more than 117,748 registered members, across 120 associations and 4,145 clubs,” Ms Hunt said. “NSW is a netball state, connecting every community like nothing else, empowering girls and women, both on and off the court, through the power of netball.”
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...