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Death Threats Against Ioc President Jacques Rogges?


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Threats against IOC head?

By BOB MACKIN, 24 HOURS

Have 2010 Winter Olympics foes gone too far?

Posters for tomorrow's noon-hour rally at Canada Place outside International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge's speech bear the headline "Dead IOC Prez." A masked cartoon figure is shown cutting the IOC-marked head off a serpent. A word balloon says "It is elementary to the Art of war: Cut off the head and the body will Die!!!"

"I found them a little bit unsettling," said housing advocate David Eby of the Pivot Legal Society. "I want to believe that it's just rhetoric. It doesn't help anybody."

The posters are hung throughout the Downtown Eastside. A 24 hours reporter saw one taped inside the window of the Downtown Eastside Residents Association yesterday.

DERA employee and Anti-Poverty Committee member Thomas Malenfant said he didn't know who produced the poster. He said the radical APC isn't organizing the rally, but will participate. He claimed it's not a death threat to Rogge, but is instead "a metaphor."

"I can almost guarantee you for sure Mr. Rogge will not be beheaded on Wednesday," Malenfant said.

A call to VANOC was not returned. Rogge is part of the IOC's semi-annual Coordination Commission checkup, which begins today. Last March's meeting was upstaged by the theft of city hall's Olympic flag by activists.

There has been a noticeable spike in anti-Olympic vandalism. The Omega countdown clock, Premier Gordon Campbell's riding office, a "Welcome to Vancouver" sign near Hastings Park and several Royal Bank of Canada branches have been recent targets.

IOC boss Rogge visits Vancouver to check out 2010 progress

Jeff Lee, Vancouver Sun

Published: Tuesday, February 26, 2008

VANCOUVER - Jacques Rogge, the president of the International Olympic Committee will begin his second-ever visit to Vancouver today at the start of an inspection of Vancouver's progress in organizing the 2010 Winter Games.

Rogge's tightly-scripted three-day visit includes a tour of venues in Vancouver and Whistler, a luncheon address on Wednesday, a meeting with Premier Gordon Campbell, and participation in a wrap-up press conference for the IOC's Vancouver Coordination Commission.

He's also holding one-on-one interviews with selected media on Thursday.

Throughout Rogge's visit, security will be tight and even media are being told they will have to use pool photographs taken during his tour of venues.

The increased security is largely due to constant protests by a small group of activists from the Anti-Poverty Coalition, who have taken to disrupting Vanoc-organized events.

The first and only time Rogge was in Vancouver after awarding Canada the 2010 Games was in February 2005, as construction of the sporting venues was ramping up.

He'd had to cancel a previously-planned visit in November, 2003 because of illness.

This time, it's Rogge's right-hand man, Gilbert Felli, who has missed the trip to Vancouver.

Felli, the IOC's executive director of Olympic Games, is laid up with back problems, according to Vanoc CEO John Furlong.

Rogge's visit is being timed with the regular bi-annual inspection by the 10-member Vancouver Coordination Commission.

For the first time since it began tracking Vanoc's progress, the commission is foregoing a tour of Whistler venues.

With all but three of the sporting venues now competition-ready, the commission is turning its attention to operational issues.

According to Vanoc, a general session will open today with an overview, but after that the commission will break into groups to discuss every aspect of Vanoc's progress, from the sports schedule to marketing to workforce and volunteers.

One aspect they likely won't be dealing with is the continuing controversy over whether women should be allowed to participate in ski-jumping.

Although supporters of women's ski jumping are in Vancouver this week, the IOC has given no indication it is willing to overturn a decision made last year to not include the sport in the 2010 schedule.

Instead, Rogge said in July that if women ski jumpers can prove their sport is viable and meets technical requirements, it may be considered for another Games, possibly in 2014 in Sochi, Russia.

jefflee@png.canwest.com

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Well Death threats are certainly something The RCMP can act on . Jacques Rogge I am sure has had this before in other places . The Thing I see and like with with one point of displeasure with the Vancouver 2010 games is the issue of Womens Ski Jumping. The people pushing for Fairness in that issue have now rented a billboard right across the street from Vanoc Offices and at a key bridge in the lower mainland. Rogge will have to be blind to not see that.

Discrimination is apparent with the stubborn stance of the IOC denying Women the right to have the ski jumping event. THe organizing committee has said they have the resources and time to have the event, the Federal Government of Canada wants it so whats the problem ?

Canada is paying the costs and are hosting , Canada should have TOTAL say of extending hosting responsibilities that are in line with the charter of rights and freedoms of our country. Including gender equality should be an ideal for the IOC to follow. I read of Gordon Brown now pushing for Netballs in the 2012.

That is a Female Exclusive event and London may get it's way because it is Europe.

That is why I am very opposed to ever having a Olympics or Commonwealth Games ever in Canada Again. We have hosted enough of these traveling circuses and we don't need anymore exposure internationally when it comes with overt discrimination as the price tag. We don't need the hand of Europeans telling us how we run anything especially in regards to Who we extend hospitality to when we host an international event on our Dime and we Return multi millions in profits to Europe.

Jim Jones

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Well Death threats are certainly something The RCMP can act on . Jacques Rogge I am sure has had this before in other places . The Thing I see and like with with one point of displeasure with the Vancouver 2010 games is the issue of Womens Ski Jumping. The people pushing for Fairness in that issue have now rented a billboard right across the street from Vanoc Offices and at a key bridge in the lower mainland. Rogge will have to be blind to not see that.

Discrimination is apparent with the stubborn stance of the IOC denying Women the right to have the ski jumping event. THe organizing committee has said they have the resources and time to have the event, the Federal Government of Canada wants it so whats the problem ?

Canada is paying the costs and are hosting , Canada should have TOTAL say of extending hosting responsibilities that are in line with the charter of rights and freedoms of our country. Including gender equality should be an ideal for the IOC to follow. I read of Gordon Brown now pushing for Netballs in the 2012.

That is a Female Exclusive event and London may get it's way because it is Europe.

That is why I am very opposed to ever having a Olympics or Commonwealth Games ever in Canada Again. We have hosted enough of these traveling circuses and we don't need anymore exposure internationally when it comes with overt discrimination as the price tag. We don't need the hand of Europeans telling us how we run anything especially in regards to Who we extend hospitality to when we host an international event on our Dime and we Return multi millions in profits to Europe.

Jim Jones

Everybody keeps throwing the word discrimination around too much in regards to the Ski Jumping issue. The IOC has technical requirements that have to be met before inclusion into the games and female ski-jumping has not met that. Why should they be allowed to go in the Olympics if they have not even held a world championships? Read the IOC's side of the issue before throwing out words like that.

Secondly, Canada is paying the costs and hosting and event that is NOT solely for Canadians. They signed a contract to host an event for the IOC, not for themselves. By signing a contract, they are agreeing to host the event by the protocols of the IOC. The Olympics are run by the IOC not the individual nation that hosts them.

I also think its funny how you are talking about discriminating the female ski-jumpers, yet you are sitting there being discriminatory towards Europeans.

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Rogge heaps praise on Vancouver; expresses concern over Beijing air

SUN0227%20Rogge%201.jpg

CREDIT: Ian Smith/Vancouver Sun

International Olympic Committee president Dr. Jacques Rogge speaks as part of the RBC Legacies Now Speaker Series.

VANCOUVER -- International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge heaped praise on the Vancouver 2010 Winter Games today for its legacy programs, but raised concerns about the continuing problem of pollution facing athletes at the 2008 Beijing Games.

In an address to the Vancouver Board of Trade about the lasting legacies of Olympic cities, Rogge said the Chinese government was clearly trying to clean up the Beijing and by Games time will have taken 1.3 million cars off the road. But he said Beijing's famously polluted air will still be a problem.

"I cannot hide the fact that there is today a danger of atmospheric pollution in Beijing. But our Chinese friends are making tremendous efforts to reduce this," he said.

Rogge's comments come as teams heading to Beijing consider strategies for protecting athletes from the effects of pollution.

Rogge has warned in the past that high pollution levels could force the IOC to reschedule some some endurance events.

Rogge, who is in Vancouver for three days to tour Olympic venues and meet with officials, did not speak with reporters after the speech to the Vancouver Board of Trade.

There was a heavy police presence outside the Vancouver Convention and Exhibition Centre, including about 30 Vancouver police officers standing behind barricades. A mounted horse squad patrolled the street in front of the convention centre.

About 20 protesters, including members of the Anti-Poverty Coalition and a group protesting against federal Olympics Minister David Emerson, showed up and were prevented from crossing the barricades.

Rogge was introduced by Vanoc CEO Jack Poole who noted that while Vanoc and the IOC often get along, they sometimes argue over differences in the way things should be done.

Rogge, who showed up in a blue power suit and tie, drew laughs when he noted that he had not realized that today was "the first official anti-bullying day" and Vanoc CEO John Furlong had told him to wear a pink tie in remembrance.

"Unfortunately I had no pink tie with me, but I would like to contribute to this anti-bullying day by swearing solemnly that I will not bully Jack or John today," he said. "Having said so, I must admit that I am extremely relieved that there is only one such day a year."

In a speech that reviewed the legacies of recent Olympic cities, Rogge said the Games have the power to inspire people, but can't solve all of the world's problems.

He said Vancouver, with two years to go, had already created a long lasting social and economic legacy, and is at the forefront of Olympic cities that since 1994 have made environmental and social sustainability another pillar of the Olympics. He cited three examples: a sustainability management and reporting system, a "creation of a culture of transparency and openness" and "early and comprehensive attention to social legacies."

He also singled out the provincially-funded 2010 Legacies Now, which promotes programs on literacy, sport, volunteerism and recreation, saying it is the first of its kind to use the Olympics as "a catalyst for change."

The Olympic movement in recent years has moved away from building "white elephants," he said, and now wants cities that host the Games to create long-term benefits for both residents and the world at large.

He credited Lillehammer, Norway, with setting a new standard for sustainability that cities now all follow.

"Every Olympic Games since Lillehammer has taken steps to protect the environment," he said.

Vancouver has extended that to include social sustainability, he said. This is Rogge's second visit since Vancouver was awarded the Games in July, 2003. It coincides with an inspection by the IOC's Vancouver Coordination Commission.

Rogge's planned tour of Whistler sports venues was postponed because of weather. Instead, he joined members of the commission in touring the Richmond Speed Skating Oval and a hockey arena at the University of B.C. In the afternoon, he visited the Vancouver Athletes Village with Mayor Sam Sullivan, who skipped the Board of Trade luncheon.

http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/st...09e&k=17792

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Thursday, February 28, 2008

IOC President Calls Vancouver 2010 A “Role Model”

Posted 11:25 am ET (GamesBids.com)

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Jacques Rogge, in Vancouver inspecting the city’s preparations for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games, told a packed ballroom at the city’s trade and convention centre that Vancouver was a “role model and we at the IOC are grateful for that”.

The Globe and Mail reports that Rogge referred specifically to Olympic venues meeting “the highest environmental standards”, the establishment of legacies for native communities, the creation of new opportunities for the disabled, and the institution of a procurement policy that enshrines sustainability. Rogge added, “you have created a unique model for social development”.

According to the newspaper, Rogge further praised organizers for measures ensuring the Games’ own environmental sustainability “a culture of transparency and openness” that has encouraged 30,000 people in just two weeks to volunteer for the 2010 Games, and efforts to boost the arts, literacy, sports and volunteerism throughout the province of British Columbia.

He said Vancouver will stage a “spectacular and extraordinary Olympic and Paralympic Games” that will inspire millions of people around the world “with the spirit of Olympianism that is so evident here”.

Rogge had planned to tour Whistler sports venues Wednesday but the tour was postponed due to poor weather. Instead he joined members of the commission in tourism touring the Richmond Speed Skating Oval and a hockey arena at the University of B.C., as well as the Vancouver Athletes Village with Vancouver’s Mayor Sam Sullivan.

Thursday Rogge is scheduled to visit the RONA Fabrication Shop, which has a contract to supply the Games with signs and other items. The plant has hired several disadvantaged youths who are being trained in carpentry and then offered positions in the plant, reports the newspaper.

Meanwhile 40 riot police stood outside the convention centre to guard against a few quiet protesters. Spokeswoman Constable Jana McGuinness said more protesters had been expected to show up. She said, “there was a poster that was circulated that was disturbing. That’s something we take seriously. Our focus is making sure it’s a safe place for everyone involved”.

John Furlong, president of VANOC said he doesn’t believe such large police contingents will take the shine off the Winter Olympics. “What’s encouraging to us is that the number of people protesting the Olympic Games seems to be failing”.

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