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Designs Of Olympic, Paralympic Staff Uniforms Unveiled


Xu Wen-Ting
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(BEIJING, January 20) -- The clothing designs of volunteers, staff and technical officials for the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games were unveiled today as part of China's celebration of the 200-day countdown to the Games of the XXIX Olympiad.

The 200-day countdown ceremony was held at Rulun Hall at the prestigious Renmin University of China and televised live across the country. On hand for the uniform unveiling representing the Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad (BOCOG) were executive vice-presidents Jiang Xiaoyu and Tang Xiaoquan. Also present at the ceremony was Wolfgang Bentheimer, managing director of adidas Greater China.

The uniforms feature "lucky clouds", the same pattern used in the design of the Olympic torch -- a delicate blend of Olympic concepts with Chinese characteristics.

Uniforms for BOCOG staff are red while those for volunteers are blue and those for technical officials are gray.

Live presentation of the uniforms

The design team of the new uniforms were represented by the Cultural Activities Department of BOCOG, Beijing Institute of Clothing Technology, Academy of Arts and Design of Tsinghua University, China Central Academy of Fine Arts and adidas, an official partner of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games.

BOCOG will outfit 130,000 individuals with uniforms provided by the German sportswear giant.

Design concepts for the uniforms began in early December 2005 and were approved by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in late August 2007.

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Poor desigin....... I think they are using lucky cloud more than IOC and Beijing 2008 logo.

I was expecting the release of torchbearer's list. :( : (

May you stop whining for once?

If you had done little research, you would have seen that the look of Beijing uniform is absolutely consistent with what has been done for the last editions of the Games (Games logo on chest, Olympic rings in the back and on the sleeves).

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Using these colors is cool...

In fact "lucky clouds" is the core of design assist. Because "China Seal" is really a logo that can't be expanded very well. So designer choose a traditional Chinese culture symbol. You can find "lucky clouds" everywhere in Duhuang mural art.

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Nice uniforms. Quiet likeable.

I'm starting to believe the “lucky clouds" is the main pattern for Beijing's graphical plan, with other patterns being unofficially released when the Games begin, or in the weeks and days leading up to the Opening Ceremony. Because really, I can't imagine an OCOG releasing all that they've come up a year before the Games.

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. Because really, I can't imagine an OCOG releasing all that they've come up a year before the Games.

Exactly, I am surprised the IOC let them release the outfits 8 months before the Opening. But I think there's something missing (or added) here which only the Security people know so that if these are copied, then BOCOG Security will know that those are counterfeit.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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May you stop whining for once?

If you had done little research, you would have seen that the look of Beijing uniform is absolutely consistent with what has been done for the last editions of the Games (Games logo on chest, Olympic rings in the back and on the sleeves).

Yeah , I must say I am quite surprised at how many people are surprised and snubbed by the constant use of the Lucky Clouds motif. This is absolutely fully in line with every other Olympic host in their *look of the games*.

The logo just can't be used in a wallpaper sense, as it is a single picture like graphic, the look of the games always works more on a large area of space.

Sydney plastered their *fluid energy* design absolutely everywhere. Infact, for the 2000 Games, the logo itself was not as present as compared to other Games - they instead decided to make better use of the *Sydney 2000* work mark combined with the fluid energy.

Likewise, Atlanta used their quilt of leaves on the fields of play (I remember they used it on the ends of basketball/volleyball courts etc), in tandem with the rings and 100 nestled in the olive wreath. The quilt pattern, was also used on uniforms.

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Yeah , I must say I am quite surprised at how many people are surprised and snubbed by the constant use of the Lucky Clouds motif. This is absolutely fully in line with every other Olympic host in their *look of the games*.

But when exactly did those past hosts begin to use their respective designs? Surely, they can't have been as early as Beijing (which at the very latest was in April when the Torch Relay was revealed - 1 year, 4 months before the Games. ) This leads me, again, to suggest that Bocog is keeping all they've come up with until August. It's just too much, too early, to think that they don't have more, albeit less prominent, patterns in store.

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I dont know the exact dates, but past Olympic events have used their official looks of the Games on things like their medals. I dont know when the Sydney medals were launched, but the fluid energy was used on their medal ribbon.

I think traditionally the panorama look isnt really given a high profile launch, so it's just a case of when people start to notice the host using it more and more.

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I'm ok with the clouds, i think they are simple and nice (altought i personally prefer the Athens 2004 one, with exception of the type font). The last ones which i remember to use a similar pattern were Sydney 2000 with that blue waves (and the olympic rings in gold color, along with the ''Sydney 2000'' letters).

As i can remember, the first true look of the games was introduced in Mexico 68 with the black and white patterns representing a native culture from there (also the first ones on having an unnoficial mascot, the dove of peace, which was the emblem for the torch relay). Munich 1972 used pastel colors into their banners. The main elements of Barcelona 92 brand were the skyline of the very same city, as well for some mosaic patterns inspired from Joan Miro. But the color was mostly blueish.

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From what I can remember

LA84: very bright colours often found in blockish formations.

Barcelona 92: the mosaic designs (also used in the final to the el mar med segment of the opening ceremony)

Lillehammer 94: the crystalised formations seen also in the official logo

Atlanta 96: the quilt of leaves, in addition to the Olympic rings and *100* in an olive branch

logo7.jpglogo7.jpg

Nagano 98: Japanese caligraphy brushstrokes made to also represent stylised athletes

Sydney 2000: the *fluid energy*. Representing the Olympic rings reflected in the harbour, they were ripples of blue

Salt Lake 2002: I think it was the called *the rhythm crystal/rhythm of the land* and featured variations of parts of the logo

Athens 2004: the panorama design featuring a range of symbols such as pottery, wave designs, sun designs etc etc

Torino 2006: the piazza

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^That third pic of Atlanta's Look is great. I wish they would have used that more prominently instead of that dull "Georgia Green". And I've always wanted to take a look at Barcelona's moasic. Sounds interesting.

And while we're at it...

Torino 2006

c3pageeng158paragraphspks6.jpg

http://www.torino2006.org/ENG/OlympicGames..._the_games.html

Athens 2004

lololololololoolbx3.png

http://multimedia.olympic.org/pdf/en_report_897.pdf

Sydney 2000

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/sydney2000..._case_study.pdf

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Hi everyone,

I'm having trouble accessing the internet at the moment, hence my lack of posts. I have tried to keep up with the news feeds - that is difficult as it is!

Anyway, I like the uniforms, they are pretty good looking, not really anything special or out of the ordinary, but still striking, and of course, fit for purpose. However, given Rogge's desire of everyone being "all one team" (hence him sleeping in the athlete's village, sporting the official uniform during the Games - unusual I guess when Mizuno have a contract with the IOC with a uniform for IOC Members/staff, that seems to be ignored), I am suprised that staff and volunteers have seperate uniforms, as if to differentiate the two groups in terms of uniform. This is not something new as such, but it is unlike recent Games like Athens and (I think) Turin, as well as many other events with IOC patronage. It was also approved by the IOC Executive Board, which has also suprised me.

We live and learn.

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However, given Rogge's desire of everyone being "all one team" (hence him sleeping in the athlete's village, sporting the official uniform during the Games - unusual I guess when Mizuno have a contract with the IOC with a uniform for IOC Members/staff, that seems to be ignored), I am suprised that staff and volunteers have seperate uniforms, as if to differentiate the two groups in terms of uniform. This is not something new as such, but it is unlike recent Games like Athens and (I think) Turin, as well as many other events with IOC patronage. It was also approved by the IOC Executive Board, which has also suprised me.

Well, I don't think it's such a bad idea for staff and volunteer to have a different uniform.

As a volunteer, it makes things easier to find quickly a staff member (for they are usually more senior than the volunteers). Besides, the two uniforms are really consistent so, there is little doubt that they are all part of the team.

As for Rogge, based n my personal experience in Athens and Torino, he very rarely wears the uniform of the Games besides part of the opening and closing ceremonies and his "official" visit to the OV.

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