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Vancouver Olympic Village


mr.x
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In Vancouver we are building the 2010 Winter Olympics Athlete's Village to exceptional levels of sustainability. After the games three quarters of the the 1,100+ residential dwellings will be sold at market rates while approximately 250 will become non-market housing for seniors and low income singles and families. This is intended to be a demonstration of the best urban planning, architectural, and engineering practices in the world today and act as the model for future local high-density development. The larger Southeast False Creek neighbourhood, of which the Olympic Village is the first phase, will include an elementary school, a streetcar line, parks, day cares, commercial, retail, office space, at least one large full-service grocery store, a community centre, a marina for non-motorized boats and kayaks, and a mixture of subsidized and market housing for 12,000 to 15,000 people, all built to very high levels of environmental sustainability (minimum LEED Silver equivalence).

The 1.4 million square foot, single phase Olympic Village is being built to the LEED Gold standard while the Community Centre is being built to LEED Platinum. The building that will become seniors' housing is going to attempt to reach the Net-Zero standard, which represents annual energy, water, and carbon neutrality. All of the buildings will feature green roofs, passive solar design, beyond-code insulation and glazing, and low/no VOC paint and carpets. Rain water will be retained in cisterns to be used for irrigation of the green roofs and landscaping. The buildings will be heated and cooled using an in-slab hydronic system connected to a hybrid district heating/cooling system powered by high-efficiency natural gas boilers and heat exchange system that will use both ground-source heat pipes and an innovative heat exchange system tied into the sewer pipes to recover their latent heat. Electricity comes from local hydroelectric dams. A streetcar will run through the neighbourhood and connect it to two nearby rapid transit stations. All parking is underground and well below average in its parking to dwelling ratio.

As an interesting final note, after the Olympics the buyers of the Village’s apartments and rowhouses will be given the names and nationalities of the athletes who stayed in their homes while competing. I think that’s a nice touch.

sefcmillenniumwaterilluve2.jpg

Source: www.millenniumwater.com

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Source: www.millenniumwater.com

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Source: City of Vancouver

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Source: City of Vancouver

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Source: City of Vancouver

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Aerial photo source: http://www.globalairphotos.com/images/bc/v...vch2007_396.jpg

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Aerial photo source: http://www.globalairphotos.com/images/bc/v...vch2007_457.jpg%20" target="_blank"> http://www.globalairphotos.com/images/bc/v...vch2007_457.jpg

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A link to a very large, hand-stitched panorama I took in the summer of 2007 showing the construction and context of the Olympic Village.

Lots more information can be found at:

City of Vancouver Olympic Village site.

www.MillenniumWater.com is the developer's sales website.

Olympic Village

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I dunno.... I wudn't say I am bowled over by the OV architecture; but then maybe it's purposely bland so it doesn't offend anyone.

Vancouver architecture involves a lot of glass...as seen across the water from the Olympic Village in False Creek:

falsecreeksunsetoctobernw3.jpg

Some could argue it looks bland, but the end product in Vancouver - from the ground as you walk in the streets - is a well designed neighbourhood.

BTW, there have been people waiting and camping out in line to buy condos at the post-2010 Olympic Village for the past week. The sales centre for the first two towers of "Millennium Water" (Olympic Village) does not go on sale for another 4 days.

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But hasn't there been a glut of condos already in BC?

And what will a 2-bdrm in the OV go for? Am just curious.

We've been having a housing boom for quite awhile, especially for condos....it's not exactly like Dubai, but cranes are everywhere. There's a huge demand for condos in Metro Vancouver, and there's no sign of it stopping anytime soon. Economists are predicting this condo boom in Vancouver will be permanent. Condos are sold very quickly...for example, three years ago, a 1,000 unit condo tower development - Yaletown Park - was sold out in 48 hours. And just last year, an 800-unit development called Woodwards had a "sold out" outside its presentation office in just 24 hours.

Just yesterday, an $18-million penthouse was sold for a new development in downtown. In downtown, $500,000 will get you a 600 sq. foot condo. Quite pricey.

The first two of many Olympic Village towers will go from $450,000 to $3.5 million. Visit http://www.millenniumwater.com/

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Over 50 line-up to buy condo on Vancouver's waterfront

Thursday, October 25 - 09:50:00 AM

Tamara Slobogean

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) - This is what condo buying has come to in Vancouver. You won't move into your new abode at 'Millennium Water' in the Athletes Village for three years but you can buy one today. Outside the presentation centre at West 2nd and Cook, some buyers have been camped out for days.

60 lawn chairs sit in the line-up, and just about everyone has a business card pinned to it, and most seem to belong to realtors. But there are very few actual bodies there, and that seems to be causing a little tension. One man shivering out there since 10 last night says they're not playing fair. He says there are unwritten rules that if you're going to be in the line-up, you don't leave the chair and go home and then come back in the morning nice and fresh.

Up for grabs today are about 200 units and a project billed as Vancouver's last waterfront community. Prices start at $600,000 and go well beyond $3 million. Part of the buzz around this project is that it will first house Olympic athletes in 2010 but today, it seems to be all about the real estate.

That line up is now 150 people.

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The market has changed since the late 1990's. Housing in Vancouver is outrageous! I couldn't imagine what it would be like to be in your early 20's, fresh out of school, and faced with almost a half million dollar mortgage for a tiny concrete box.

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The market has changed since the late 1990's. Housing in Vancouver is outrageous! I couldn't imagine what it would be like to be in your early 20's, fresh out of school, and faced with almost a half million dollar mortgage for a tiny concrete box.

Well, being in your early 20s would be an early start on a half million $ mortgage.

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Thing is, people are buying property as an investment. Many of the new condos end up being rented out. And no developer is going to flood the market with condos they know won't sell...they have to pay their bills and investors too.

Exactly. Just look at the condo-flippers' market disaster in the far opposite end of the continent, in Miami and Florida. Not only did they overbuild, but now that the credit crunch has kicked in, many of those condo investors are still paying the mortgages for empty, non-investment-returning property. The ideal situation is a perfect equilibrium of supply and demand.

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Millennium Water project does $200 million in sales on 1st day

Malcolm Parry

Vancouver Sun

Saturday, October, 27, 2007

Folk camped on the Cook Street sidewalk for up to five nights this week to spend an average of $915 a square foot on South False Creek condominiums they can't occupy until 2011. By Thursday night, they'd committed $200 million to acquire 241 of the 302 units in the Millennium Water project's first offering.

It was a big day for star condo marketer Bob Rennie, whose staff recorded deals on an ultra-sustainable project that will put 1,100 residential units -- 400 of them affordable-housing and market-rental -- on its 11-hectare site.

But it wasn't Rennie's biggest opening day. That was the $240-million buying frenzy for the Woodward's redevelopment that also attracted a longer-lasting line of sidewalk campers -- not to buy in but to make their case for the homeless.

Athletes' village still on budget: Mayor

With concrete poured and construction about to begin, development could hit $131-million target

Clare Ogilvie, The Province

Published: Wednesday, October 31, 2007

WHISTLER -- The Whistler athletes' village is set to come in on budget.

With the in-ground infrastructure in place for at least five per cent less than budgeted, the concrete poured and home construction about to begin, it looks like the developers will hit their $131-million target.

"I just don't see it being substantially over budget," said Eric Martin, chairman of the board of the Whistler Development Corporation, which was formed by the municipality to build the village.

"We have tried to build in contingencies all the way along and we have tremendous expertise . . . in everyone that is working on the project," added Whistler Mayor Ken Melamed.

Site work costs came in under estimates by approximately $500,000, due to efficient use of machinery and smaller than anticipated volumes of rock to blast and move. Rock crushing was also moved up in the schedule and completed in 2006, providing a stockpile of approximately 40,000 tonnes of gravel for road base and sub base.

The WDC hasn't touched its $11-million contingency fund, though Martin said he has no qualms about using it if necessary.

The Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Games contributed $35.5 million to the project. Originally, the money was to be used to put a temporary village in place to house the close to 2,500 athletes and team officials who will be staying there.

The municipality in 2005 decided instead to use the money as seed funding to help build permanent housing that would be used for local workers after the Games. It is contributing $11 million, with the rest of the money being borrowed, then repaid from proceeds of the sale of the units.

"I think the really good news is that we will end up with over 300 units of resident housing and have the legacy," said Martin, a vice-president at Bosa Development, who took on the project for $1 a year.

The 40 townhouses will go on sale next year and, with more than 700 people on the municipal waiting list for employee housing, there is little doubt they will be snapped up.

There will be 350 residential units for use after the Games. Of those, 240 will be available to local workers to buy. An apartment rental building and an international hostel will provide the remaining 110 units.

The athletes' village phase will sell for about $231 a square foot, so the housing will range from $150,000 to $500,000.

clareogilvie@telus.net

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  • 2 weeks later...

olympicvillagenov102007wz8.jpg

Source: My Photo ( Vancouverite in SSC | SFUVancouver in SSP )

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Source: My Photo ( Vancouverite in SSC | SFUVancouver in SSP )

"Habitat Island" is now fully landscaped. This island will only be accessible at low tide. The three tall dead tress are perches for our local bald eagle population.

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NINE cranes up in Millennium Water area now, and 1 crane right near Cambie Bridge area.

Also, I noticed they've demolished 2 old warehouses in SEFC but near the bridge area.

Last week that area was insanely busy. When I was walking over the bridge there was a *line-up* of dump trucks from the street right to the water where they were dumping into barges. The line-up was 19 dump-trucks long...so really, the construction is getting pretty rapid there.

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  • 3 months later...
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