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Ioc Introduces Youth Olympic Games


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Given that the Youth Olympics are, at least in the short term, going to be a far smaller event than their senior counterparts, then surely this is an opportunity for the slightly smaller cities, who perhaps can't grasp the Olympics themselves, to get their moment in the spotlight. In Britain I'm thinking of places like Birmingham, Sheffield, Manchester as examples. But the IOC has to be careful this doesn't get too big. Also, the no new infrastructure edict is totally ridiculous.

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What is ridiculous is the idea of the Youth Olympics. Maybe a Youth Olympic Festival or something that gets kids together to talk about and participate in sport, and give the IOC and sport leaders a chance to both promote activity and study what kids are interested in. But the new laziness of kids - in the Western world at least - comes from our wacked out commercial society that markets video games, fast food, SUV's and is so overly protective of kids that do any activity that they bubble wrap them in padding and helmets just to go for a stroll in the park (which makes it no fun). The real focus should be on the parents and getting them to get more active so they will in turn have active kids.

It is such a backwards idea. The IOC is worried about kids not participating in sport and being unhealthy, yet they gladly take big buckets of money from Coca-Cola and McDonalds?

I smell a flop.

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You know there will be a Korean bid...

Seoul?

Busan?

It would have to be a city with existing facilities - no time to build.

(this could be exciting - fill the bidding void between 2014 and 2016)

From insider sources: Moscow, Singapore.

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I know. But, some people are switching their thinking (in their minds and behind the scenes) that Pound is considered part of the "Samaranch old school." Or else, why would the winter athletes of Torino 2006 voted in Beckie Scott in the first place? In fact, I haven't heard much of the native Albertan, since her election as IOC member last year. :huh:

It is notorious that Samaranch and Pound cannot stand each other (after all Pound tried to counter Samaranch in its move to extend the age limit for IOC members from 75 to 80 years old)...

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What is ridiculous is the idea of the Youth Olympics. Maybe a Youth Olympic Festival or something that gets kids together to talk about and participate in sport, and give the IOC and sport leaders a chance to both promote activity and study what kids are interested in. But the new laziness of kids - in the Western world at least - comes from our wacked out commercial society that markets video games, fast food, SUV's and is so overly protective of kids that do any activity that they bubble wrap them in padding and helmets just to go for a stroll in the park (which makes it no fun). The real focus should be on the parents and getting them to get more active so they will in turn have active kids.

It is such a backwards idea. The IOC is worried about kids not participating in sport and being unhealthy, yet they gladly take big buckets of money from Coca-Cola and McDonalds?

I smell a flop.

I think you make some extremely valid points. You're right to talk about the way in which kids are mollycoddled these days far too much. You're right to point out the contradiction between concern over unhealthy kids and taking money from fast food companies.

But if this kind of event is going to happen, and if it is going to have any meaning whatsoever, then I think it is imperative that it is competitive. I can't stand this culture of non-competition that seems to have come into sport in schools in this country particularly in recent years. It is inevitable that some people are better than others. That is the basis of life itself, for heaven's sake. Kids have to understand that it's right to seek to better yourself, that it's right to want to be the very best you can be and if this is a way of promoting that, that has to be a good thing.

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I think you make some extremely valid points. You're right to talk about the way in which kids are mollycoddled these days far too much. You're right to point out the contradiction between concern over unhealthy kids and taking money from fast food companies.

But if this kind of event is going to happen, and if it is going to have any meaning whatsoever, then I think it is imperative that it is competitive. I can't stand this culture of non-competition that seems to have come into sport in schools in this country particularly in recent years. It is inevitable that some people are better than others. That is the basis of life itself, for heaven's sake. Kids have to understand that it's right to seek to better yourself, that it's right to want to be the very best you can be and if this is a way of promoting that, that has to be a good thing.

I tend to agree with both you and Tim about the overprotective nature of parents in our society. This is a direct result of the over broadcasting of the pretty white girls getting abducted in recent years and it become so sensationalized. This is 7 years ago when one of my teachers made a comment about youth today (now 7 years ago) not being allowed to go out and play but instead being sheltered in their homes and not allowed to do anything but site there. I know first hand about this, my dad point-blank refused to let me play in competitive sports even though I begged to play football from about the time i was 8 till 12. (my dad's a JW and they don't believe in competitiveness because it sets one person or group of people above another and thats against God.) its probably why I started watching sports because I was never allowed to take part other than school and school gym sucks.

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According to l'Equipe, the following cities are candidate for the 2010 YOG:

  • Moscow
  • Singapore
  • Guadalajara
  • Hamburg

I think the IOC will select a city they already know since the campaign is going to be so brief. That would leave Singapore and Moscow, two recent hosts of IOC Sessions. Given that Sochi has just been awarded 2014, I wouldn't be surpised if Singapore stages the first YOG.

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Well, here in Germany there are no reports on Hamburg's alleged bid so far. Very strange.

I agree. To tell the truth, I don't see why Hamburg would bid for these games when they could clearly bid for the 2020 Games.

I think the YOG should be hosted by city which couldn't host the "real" games.

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But why would the Germans put Hamburg forward for the Olympics when their big gun Berlin is potentially in the mix?

Based on the Berlin 2000 and Hamburg 2012 bid books, I think that Hamburg could come up with as good a plan as Berlin. The question is: will the IOC choses Hamburg over the other candidate cities? It depends on the field of candidates: with a line-up a la 2012, I would say no. Otherwise, why not?

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Based on the Berlin 2000 and Hamburg 2012 bid books, I think that Hamburg could come up with as good a plan as Berlin. The question is: will the IOC choses Hamburg over the other candidate cities? It depends on the field of candidates: with a line-up a la 2012, I would say no. Otherwise, why not?

I just see it as being similar to the London or Manchester situation we've had in recent years. With all due respect to Hamburg, a Berlin bid is surely more compelling to the IOC.

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I know that they havent indicated but Sheffield may be stand a good chance since they have the facilities following the world student games a number of years ago

Welcome aboard.

I think you're dead right. Assuming the no new infrastructure rule doesn't extend to refurb or redevelopment of existing facilities, I'd like to see Sheffield go in for it, preferably with a revampled Don Valley Stadium.

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I think you're dead right. Assuming the no new infrastructure rule doesn't extend to refurb or redevelopment of existing facilities, I'd like to see Sheffield go in for it, preferably with a revampled Don Valley Stadium.

Do you believe that the IOC would give Sheffield the Youth Olympics of 2010 when London has the 2012 Olympics

Also, countries have to consider if a "Youth Olympics" would be held against them in the future if they plan a bid for the big games?

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Do you believe that the IOC would give Sheffield the Youth Olympics of 2010 when London has the 2012 Olympics

Also, countries have to consider if a "Youth Olympics" would be held against them in the future if they plan a bid for the big games?

That is possible and the winning of a bid for one of the current games seems to undermine a bod for the other. However there cant be that many cities with the right infastructure of the right size and in place. It strikes me that as the youth games will be considrably smaller than their adult counterparts one can assume that the infastructure doesnt have to be adult size (eg there isnt a need for main stadia of 80000+ seats. so the the likes of sheffield may have an advantage

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On June 12, the vice-president of Macau Olympic Committee - also the president of ACOLOP (Portuguese version of CWF) - met with Rogge and stated that Portugal would be an "excellent candidate to host the Youth Olympic Games".

This was before the "no new infrastructure" rule was instated. Considering that every Olympic sport will be represented, Lisbon - the obvious candidate - lacks a velodrome and a whitewater venue.

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This was before the "no new infrastructure" rule was instated. Considering that every Olympic sport will be represented, Lisbon - the obvious candidate - lacks a velodrome and a whitewater venue.

Rogge did say that all Olympic sports would be represented, but that EVENTS may be cut. Whitewater in particular, I think, could suffer from this _ it's not a common facility at all, it would restrict the possible hosts. Correct me someone if I'm wrong, but I'd assume whitewater canoeing wouldn't have an IF of its own, but rather be under a general canoeing IF. So a host could include canoeing, but just not have whitewater events.

As for a velodrome _ there must be options for a temporary facility in Lisbon (you could also argue that road events could cover all of cycling, but I doubt they'd want to lose the track events).

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Rogge did say that all Olympic sports would be represented, but that EVENTS may be cut. Whitewater in particular, I think, could suffer from this _ it's not a common facility at all, it would restrict the possible hosts. Correct me someone if I'm wrong, but I'd assume whitewater canoeing wouldn't have an IF of its own, but rather be under a general canoeing IF. So a host could include canoeing, but just not have whitewater events.

As for a velodrome _ there must be options for a temporary facility in Lisbon (you could also argue that road events could cover all of cycling, but I doubt they'd want to lose the track events).

Yes, perhaps whitewater events could be dropped seeing as they're only 4 currently and the logistics and venue requirements are too demanding. This opposed to track cycling which has more events and notability, making it harder to be left out of the YOG. If "no new infrastructure" doesn't cover temporary venues, that's one thing... but I guess that if the city was to build a velodrome it would be a permanent one. This way if it doesn't get the Games it will have a venue ready for future attempts.

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