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Boxing - Go Or No Go?


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I suppose lately it's an open secret that boxing is falling out of favor here in the United States and I have heard that the IOC is on it's last nerve will all the judging controversies in boxing during the Games.

General question: is it time for boxing to be dropped from the Games?

Me personally, if they could find a way for fairer judging, great. Sadly, that seems to be a troubling issue so perhaps it's time for boxing to take a break from the Games.

Comments?

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First of all, I'm no fan of boxing whatesoever. Never been interested, I find it too much of a blood sport with too much corraption within its ranks.

That said, I'd keep it in the games. At its amateur level at the Olympics it is one sport that throws up a lot of chances for many, many non-traditional Olympic powers. Anything that broadens the appeal and chance for results at the games beyond the traditional biggies is alright by me.

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It is true that there have been many medalists from many countries, but it does seem Cuba has a monopoly on the sweet science. Neither here nor there since it can be argued the US is dominant in the sprints and in swimming, along with Australia.

But again, the problem is: judging. There have been some VERY bad calls in the Olympics when it comes to boxing and I know the IOC is getting concerned. Both boxing and weightlifting are really under the gun in 2008 to see if they do have a future in the Games.

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well, boxing really need to reform. under anwar chowdry boxing gained a lot of negative press. now that he is no longer at the helm of AIBA i hope that things goes for the better.

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Boxing must absolutely unquestionably remain as an Olympic sport. Since Seoul in particular when Roy Jones Jr was on the wrong end of a ridiculously bad decision, the judging system has seen major reform. We now have a system where five judges sit at ringside and if three of them press their appropriately coloured button within a second of a punch being landed, that punch scores a point. You always know watching what the situation is and how the scores are arrived at. You might quibble at the odd punch here and there not being scored when you think it should, but generally I don't see a problem with amateur boxing. It seems to me that there is a risk of the state of the professional game being used as some sort of excuse to give the amateur side the heave-ho from the Olympics and that is not right.

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On paper, the system works. In execution, there are still issues and the system is imperfect. I know there were still issues with the system in every Olympics since introduction in Barcelona.

To be fair, I know people could say the same about judging in gymnastics, figure skating and whatnot. And they would be right: there is no "perfect" way to judge. The issue is at what point is the sport actually tainted by the issues and can it be fixed? It's a purely subjective question with no easy answers.

Boxing must absolutely unquestionably remain as an Olympic sport. Since Seoul in particular when Roy Jones Jr was on the wrong end of a ridiculously bad decision, the judging system has seen major reform. We now have a system where five judges sit at ringside and if three of them press their appropriately coloured button within a second of a punch being landed, that punch scores a point. You always know watching what the situation is and how the scores are arrived at. You might quibble at the odd punch here and there not being scored when you think it should, but generally I don't see a problem with amateur boxing. It seems to me that there is a risk of the state of the professional game being used as some sort of excuse to give the amateur side the heave-ho from the Olympics and that is not right.
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To be brutally honest, I don't think you will ever find a perfect solution. What the system as it is now ensures, though, is that we don't get the sort of ridiculous decisions which did blight the sport in the past. Whatever issues there are now are, I suspect, much less than when a boxer actually remained in the ring in protest at a particularly bad decision. The sport's come a long way and that should be recognised.

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First of all, I'm no fan of boxing whatesoever. Never been interested, I find it too much of a blood sport with too much corraption within its ranks.

That said, I'd keep it in the games. At its amateur level at the Olympics it is one sport that throws up a lot of chances for many, many non-traditional Olympic powers. Anything that broadens the appeal and chance for results at the games beyond the traditional biggies is alright by me.

The best arguments by far. Personally, I abhor the sport -- and by its very nature, it's the only 'beliigerent' sport on the Olympic plate that gets points in how hard you HIT your opponent. Sure, there are the other hand-to-hand contact sports (fencing, judo, wrestling, taekwondo), but you get extra points for style and the counter-force manuevers seem to have been developed in that you minimize injuries.

However, I would like to say:

1. Boxing in 1984 and 1996 was nearly a sell-out sport in both Olympiads. As a matter of fact, becaue I had a little more $$ in 1996, I made a couple of hundred $$$ scalping tix to boxing event s because I knew those would sell out, regardless of who was boxing whom, especially in the semi-final rounds. So, yes keep it.

2. But on the other hand, to equalize things again, when wil they have the women's division? It's bad enough with women weightlifting. No, throw boxing OUT!!

3. On the other hand, it's a relatively inexpensive sport to mount. Only requires 1 medium-sized venue (usually a 10,000 seater. SO, yes you MAY keep it.

4. On the other hand, scalping will probably be outlawed by Chicago 2016, so yes, BOOT THE damned, ugly pugalistic sport out!! It is soooooooo NO CLASS!!!

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Feel like I was at a White House press breifing, there was so much spin there...

I kid, I kid.

All valid points and I am loathe to argue. Yes, I agree, women's boxing has been for too long sidelinded and should be considered for inclusion.

On the other hand... there will always be problems with the judging. Learn to live with it, I suppose.

On the other hand... maybe it is like pro wresting, people paying good cash money to see a Cuban or American pound the stuffing out of some kid from Thailand

The fact is... boxing will always be up and down. It will take a major controversy to boot it from the Games. I mean, the judging is rigged six ways from Sunday in ice dancing and it's hanging on.

Oh, BTW, in no way was this post intended to mock. Just smiling a bit and having fun.

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the judging is rigged six ways from Sunday in ice dancing and it's hanging on.

I know about the kidding. But DONCHA mock Ice Dancing.

Actually, after the scandale 2002 and the totally revamped judging, both the skaters and the judging community have stepped up to the plate. There are still teh favorites -- but they don't always stay on top very long. Look, our Belbin and Agosto, being the silver-medal winners in Torino, are supposed to stay on top all the way, leading up to 2010. You would think. But no, they have fallen along the way, and really have to turn out an exceptional, mistake-free performance to stay on top. So, no, the judging in Figure Skatingis more fool proof than it was before, and except for the anonimity, more transparetn also. Also, the scores are randomly picked from a panel of, I think 12 judges -- and the computer does the picking and the passing. Boxing is still by 3 known judges, kinda overseen by a Head Technical judge (or something like that). It's closer to gymnastics and diving. BUt at least those are beautiful to look at.

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I know about the kidding. But DONCHA mock Ice Dancing.

Actually, after the scandale 2002 and the totally revamped judging, both the skaters and the judging community have stepped up to the plate. There are still teh favorites -- but they don't always stay on top very long. Look, our Belbin and Agosto, being the silver-medal winners in Torino, are supposed to stay on top all the way, leading up to 2010. You would think. But no, they have fallen along the way, and really have to turn out an exceptional, mistake-free performance to stay on top. So, no, the judging in Figure Skatingis more fool proof than it was before, and except for the anonimity, more transparetn also. Also, the scores are randomly picked from a panel of, I think 12 judges -- and the computer does the picking and the passing. Boxing is still by 3 known judges, kinda overseen by a Head Technical judge (or something like that). It's closer to gymnastics and diving. BUt at least those are beautiful to look at.

9 of the 12 scores count to be exact.
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New development

Electronic vest that scores

Perhaps the answer

SYDNEY, May 12, 2007 (AFP) - A boxing vest developed in Australia could revolutionise scoring in the troubled Olympic sport, reports here said Saturday, after the technology was approved for further trials.

Scientists at the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organisation (CSIRO) have developed a new system, which aims to rid the sport of contentious judging at Olympic and world amateur tournaments.

Sensors located in the lightweight vest, gloves and head protector record blows and points are transmitted via wireless technology to a large screen for viewing by spectators, who also see the target area where the punch was registered, the reports said.

Named the Automated Boxing Scoring System (ABSS), the equipment was developed by AIS and CSIRO researchers, while an Indian manufacturer inserted sensors inside gloves.

Wu Ching-Kuo, the new president of the Amateur Boxing International Association watched a demonstration of the new technology in Bangkok last month during the King's Cup boxing tournament.

Following the demonstration, the Australian delegation was given approval to conduct further trials at the AIS.

Saturday's Sydney Morning Herald said Wu also offered to arrange competitive bouts in which scoring would be done simultaneously with the current scoring system and the sensor format.

Taiwan's Wu was elected late last year on a mandate of reform following exposure of corrupt judging at the 2004 Athens Olympics and previous Olympics.

The existing scoring system involved judges pressing computer keys to record scoring blows.

But there have been claims that the scoring system was vulnerable to corruption, as bribed judges could repeatedly press the key of the favoured boxer.

Professor Allan Hahn, the head of the AIS Applied Research Centre, said he was greatly encouraged by the success of the Bangkok trial, but admitted the system still had glitches, such as the problem of blocked or deflected blows being scored.

``A boxer scores when the glove of one boxer simultaneously impacts with the scoring area of another,'' Hahn told the newspaper. ``A boxer can't hit his own gloves together and score but we still have a problem with blocked blows being registered.

``A CSIRO scientist is working with the group to exclude these punches. We think we are close to a solution to it.''

Hahn also conceded the electronics need to be fully resistant to water, given that it is common for trainers to pour substantial volumes of water over boxers between rounds.

AFP

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This looks like a very interesting development, and one that would go some way to helping get better, fairer outcomes. However, I still feel that the strides boxing has made in recent times should be recognised. I mean, in who's eyes is boxing a "troubled Olympic sport" exactly?

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I believe Boxing should remain at the Olympics (Amateur Boxing is the only kind of Boxing I actualy enjoy), but I find its about time to add Women's Boxing (aparently, a request from the ABIA to add Women's Boxing in Beijing, but it was denied).

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Is women's boxing that big a sport?

The only thing I know about it is that Mohammed Ali's daughter boxes.

But can't that be said of many sports _ gender equality may have made great strides in sport, but it's still few and far between the number of sports where women enjoy the same profile and attention as the men do.

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Is women's boxing that big a sport?

Not at all. With all due respect to the women who are successful boxers, it's basically just a novelty sport at this point. The quality of competition isn't there, the popularity isn't there, and there are still parts of the world where many people think it's downright barbaric (I believe the UK only agreed to start issuing licenses for it in the late 90's). It honestly isn't much more than a sideshow at this point.

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Baseball? I saw a clip of her boxing once. She's supposed to be fairly big box office in the ring.

Oh, so that was true! I never realised. I thought it was a joke on her getting her stooges to bash Nancy Kerrihan with the baseball bat.

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Oh no, very true. If you'd seen a photo of her on the ice in Lillehammer compared to her in the ring, you would probably struggle to recognise them as being pictures of one and the same person.

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