Jump to content

Blatter Says Rotation "dead"


Recommended Posts

FIFA Says World Cup Rotation Could End

ZURICH, Switzerland - FIFA president Sepp Blatter said the system of rotating the World Cup among continents could end after the 2014 tournament, a move that could hurt the United States' bid for 2018.

"The FIFA executive committee has decided that the process of the rotation will go to 2014," Blatter said at a news conference Friday.

Whether it continues will be decided when the executive committee meets in Durban, South Africa, ahead of the 2010 qualifying draw on Nov. 23. That also is when the executive committee will select the site of the 2014 tournament, which is designated for South America and is likely to be in Brazil.

Under the rotation system, the 2018 tournament would be in the North and Central American and Caribbean region. However, the British government has said it would back a bid by England.

FIFA also said that the son of CONCACAF president and FIFA vice president Jack Warner must pay 750,000 Euros ($1 million) to SOS Children's Villages in repayment for selling tickets at inflated prices during last year's World Cup. FIFA was unable to sanction Warner's son, Daryan, because he was employed outside the FIFA family. Daryan allegedly sold the tickets through the Trinidad and Tobago travel agency Simpaul, which was owned by Warner's family.

"We have already received a first payment by the Simpaul organization ... of $250,000," Blatter said. "They are trying now to get the rest of the money of the two other partners."

FIFA said its equity had gone from minus-$10.9 million in January 2003, following the collapse of its marketing partner ISL/ISMM, to $617 million last December. The World Cup ran a profit of $207 million, of which FIFA received $60 million.

"Five years ago they wanted to send me to jail, and now I am getting a round of applause," Blatter said. "So you see how things can change."

The executive committee also:

_ gave permission for Toronto FC to compete in Major League Soccer and Bermuda Hogges in the United Soccer League.

_ rescheduled the 2008 FIFA Under-20 Women's World Cup in Chile from Aug. 28-Sept. 14 to Dec. 30, 2008-Jan. 12, 2009.

_ lengthened the 2009 FIFA Confederations Cup in South Africa by one day to June 14-28, with the tournament to be played in Bloemfontein, Johannesburg, Port Elizabeth, Pretoria and Rustenberg.

_ introduced a qualifying playoff between the Oceania champion and the Japanese champion at this year's FIFA Club World Cup in Japan.

_ awarded television rights for the 2014 World Cup to the European Broadcasting Union and ARD/ZDF in Germany.

_ ratified the emergency committee's decision to lift the suspension of Kenya.

_ decided the FIFA Congress in May will vote on whether to make Montenegro the 208th member.

_ scheduled the 2008 FIFA Congress from May 28-30 in Sydney, Australia.

A service of the Associated Press

How many times does he have to say it. I clearlyn remember Blatter already saying that rotation would be dead after the 2010 tournament as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rotation is the ONLY fair way to distribute these prized, INTERNATIONAL sporting events. Rotation will never die out. It's practiced by the Olympics; by the ISU (Int'l Skating Union) for their World Championships; and would also be for FINA and IAAF if they had more bidders for their World Championships.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Blatter says that the rotation could end. But that also means that it could be continued. So I don't know whether we really can read into his words that he has declared the rotation "dead" already. That depends on the decision of the FIFA executive committee members and not on Blatter's personal decision, anyway.

I think that they'll find a compromise and continue the rotation -- but with a guaranteed slot for Europe every three World Cups. So they could create a rotation system like:

2018 Europe

2022 Asia or Oceania

2026 North or Middle America

2030 Europe

2034 Africa

2038 South America

2042 Europe

and so on...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, Blatter says that the rotation could end. But that also means that it could be continued. So I don't know whether we really can read into his words that he has declared the rotation "dead" already. That depends on the decision of the FIFA executive committee members and not on Blatter's personal decision, anyway.

I think that they'll find a compromise and continue the rotation -- but with a guaranteed slot for Europe every three World Cups. So they could create a rotation system like:

2018 Europe

2022 Asia or Oceania

2026 North or Middle America

2030 Europe

2034 Africa

2038 South America

2042 Europe

and so on...

Not necessarily. I would alter that to:

2018 - North America

2022 - I really don't care where it's held at this point...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with the proposal of Olympian. Of course, no rotation and the WC always in Europe is as stupid as Oceania or Africa hosting the same times than Europe.

By the way, the CFB launched the campaign for Brazil 2014... the members of the national team take some pictures with an special shirt with the logo of the bid.

http://www2.uol.com.br/cbf/sitenoticias/_6...0312007326.html

camisa2014.jpg

camisa_2014_detalhe.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the rotation was just to bring the WC to Africa

no African country could have beaten a strong European bid

and so the FIFA used the rotation to allow just African bids

and South American for 2014

i would like to see the Rotation die

because i like the best country to host

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
I agree, every third world cup for Europe is a good compromise.

And it looks like that's just the type of proposal that is being examined:

New Fifa rule could help England World Cup bid

By David Owen

An England bid to host the 2018 World Cup may be launched early next year if, as expected, Fifa change their rules to allow European bidders.

Coming home? Wembley Stadium could host the World Cup final in 2018 if Fifa rules are changed

World football's governing body is poised to abandon the concept of 'rotation' which many feared could torpedo England's hopes of staging football's showpiece tournament for the first time in more than half a century.

Instead, new rules paving the way for 2018 bids by countries from at least three different continents, including Europe, could be approved as soon as October.

Asked about the rule change yesterday, Richard Caborn, the former sports minister who was named last month as prime minister Gordon Brown's World Cup ambassador, said: "If confirmed, this could well clear the way for a government-supported Football Association bid for the 2018 World Cup early in the new year."

Caborn went on: "Competition is bound to be fierce. However, the experience gained in London's successful 2012 Olympic bid will be put to good use.

"The government looks forward to teaming up once again with sporting leaders to ensure that a World Cup bid is given the best possible chance of success."

The Daily Telegraph understands that a senior Fifa figure is expected to propose a new formula under which any country be allowed to bid except those situated in the last two continents to stage the competition. With Africa and South America set to host the 2010 and 2014 events, this would clear European countries to bid.

There seems a good chance that such a proposal, which would restrict Europe to at most one World Cup every 12 years, would be accepted. With Australia having moved to the Asian Football Confederation, nowhere in the Oceania region appears a truly viable host. This would make it difficult for Fifa to pursue a strict policy of 'rotating' the World Cup between continents indefinitely, even if they wanted to. The vital change in the rules determining who will have the right to bid for the 2018 World Cup could be made at a meeting of Fifa's executive committee in Zurich on Oct 29-30.

Such a change would be great news for British sport, since it could lead to the two most prestigious international sports events - the Olympic Games and the World Cup - being staged in the UK in the same decade.

England would still face a hard fight to win the battle to host the competition. Other potential bidders include sports-mad Australia, China, which will hog the international spotlight next year when Beijing hosts the summer Olympics, Russia, the US and perhaps Italy.

An England bid would, however, have potentially decisive attributes. The country's football infrastructure, epitomised by, but by no means confined to, the new Wembley stadium, is already impressive and is set to receive a new wave of investment ahead of the 2012 Olympics.

Fifa's commercial experts are likely to be keen for their flagship competition, whose success is essential for the body's financial stability, to return to football's prosperous European heartland after two tournaments away. With the 2010 World Cup to be staged in South Africa and the 2014 tournament set for Brazil, the competition is already facing the longest period away from Europe in its nearly 80-year history.

England also, for once, look well-placed compared with any European rivals. France, Germany and Spain have all hosted World Cups more recently than 1966.

A well-run English bid would also have high hopes of roping in a string of high-profile supporters ranging from David Beckham, the sport's leading international icon, to Prince William, president of the FA Council.

Fifa's decision on the 2018 host is expected in 2011 or 2012.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...