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Bump!

It's the anglo conspiracy!

1996 - Athens As expected Athens wins. But then came the delays and problems around the transport and infrastructure. Beside that, the IOC decides to put ongoing to the event even when the remarks of

Maybe swap Beijing & London then for Beijing 00 & London 04. London followed by NYC would've been good. In a sense all these are changeable, the cities representing their countries. So NYC 04 can easily become LA or Chicago 04. Also, with 94, the US may have chosen a more winnable candidate than Anchorage thinking they had more chance with Lillehammer out of the question.

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1996 - Athens

As expected Athens wins. But then came the delays and problems around the transport and infrastructure. Beside that, the IOC decides to put ongoing to the event even when the remarks of Montreal 76 are close. In the technical aspect it was a failure, but the emotive aspect remains untouched.

1998 - Salt Lake City

With the results of 1996 voting, it means SLC has an easy competition winning with a difference of 2-1

2000 - Sydney

Even with the desires of Samaranch, Sydney still beats the favorite Beijing

2002 - Östersund

Without SLC, Sweden will finally win the first Winter Olympic Games

2004 - Beijing

After their rage against IOC and reclamations of bribery and conspiracy, China decides to pull off another bid. With not clear European contender -After Barcelona-Athens- and a competition of "new" frontiers -Cape Town, Istanbul-, and returning contenders -Buenos Aires, Toronto-. China wins

2006 - Vancouver

With the defeat of Toronto, they decide to pull off a surprising Winter Olympics bid and finally they won

2008 - Paris

The big contenders return. Paris, Rome, Istanbul and including Moscow and Istanbul. The first two are eliminated on the first circles. After a neck-to-neck race with Rome, France wins and Paris is the first city to get three SOG.

2010 - Sochi

South Corea came with a great bid. But Russia pull off a surprise win

2012 - Tokyo

After considerated 2008 as an "European race"; this 2012 is more difficult to think about this. Maybe Rio could win, but I'm not too sure -The moment was 2016, but winning in 2012 Tokyo could keep 2016-. So I put an imaginary race. Madrid-New York City-Rio de Janeiro-Tokyo, with Madrid as the "sturbborn" feeling. A close race with not "clear" favorite. At the end, I think Tokyo will surprise as the "safe contender" with Rio as the alternative.

2014 - Pyeongchang

This time, only took one defeat to win. Almaty enters to the competition.

2016 - Rio de Janeiro

The moment was there, the narrative was strong and the international recognition was legitimate. Rio de Janeiro cleans up the competition with Chicago and Madrid. The moment of USA-IOC was in the low end and Madrid didn't keep up the votes to win.

2018 - Munich

Not doubt, the clear favorite after Pyeongchang winning

2020 - London

With Tokyo out of the equation and the recent success of Tokyo and Paris, London keeps a proper plan of the SOG. Madrid would lose in fewer votes and London will win in a landside victory against Istanbul.

Summer Olympic Games

1996 - Athens

2000 - Sydney

2004 - Beijing

2008 - Paris

2012 - Tokyo (Or Rio de Janeiro)

2016 - Rio de Janeiro (Or Tokyo)

2020 - London

Winter Olympic Games

1998 - Salt Lake City

2002 - Östersund

2006 - Vancouver

2010 - Sochi

2014 - Pyeongchang

2018 - Munich

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been working on my guesses for this for the past three days. It was the perfect way to procrastinate from studying for finals!

1996:

Candidates: Athens, Atlanta, Belgrade, Manchester, Melbourne, Toronto

Athens is elected the host of the 1996, narrowly beating out Atlanta 51-35. Due to budget concerns and construction of venues and infrastructure falling far behind, the IOC revokes the 1996 games from Athens and places them in 1984 host, Los Angeles in October of 1993.

1998:

Candidates: Aosta, Jaca, Nagano, Ostersund, Salt Lake City

After the United States was defeated in the 1996 bid, they came on strong with the 1998 bid with Salt Lake City, Utah. Salt Lake City wins the bid in the first round of voting. Because of the 1996 games being put in Los Angeles, in October 1993, the USOC is forces to give up the 1998 Winter Games in November of 1993. The IOC places the 1998 Winter Games in 1976 host, Innsbruck, Austria.

2000:

Candidates: Beijing, Istanbul, New York, Sydney, Toronto

The election of the 2000 Summer Olympics was help in September of 1993, one month before the 1996 games were moved to Los Angeles. Many see Beijing as the initial front runner, but after the candidate city visits, Beijing receives a low score which all but kills their chances. New York, Sydney and Toronto are seen as the front runners with New York leading with a slight advantage. Istanbul is eliminated first, followed by Beijing. Sydney is eliminated in the third round leaving New York and Toronto in the final round. Toronto pulls a surprising defeat over New York in a 46-42 vote.

2002:

Candidates: Muju, Nagano, Ostersund, Salt Lake City, Sion

Going into the 104th IOC session, the IOC was split between two camps: Those who wanted to see Salt Lake City win, and those who thought that North America had hosted enough times already. In the end, Salt Lake City did not have enough support. Nagano defeats Sion in the final vote.

2004:

Candidates: Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Rome, Stockholm, Sydney

After losing the 2000 by a surprise victory for Toronto, Sydney comes back with a stronger bid, but faces stiff competition from Rome. Despite the competition, Sydney defeats Rome in the final round.

2006:
Candidates: Helsinki, Klagenfurt, Poprad-Tatry, Salt Lake City, Sion, Turin, Zakopane

Because no bribery scandal came out because of the 2002 Salt Lake bid, the weird 1999 candidate selection process never takes place. Helsinki, Salt Lake City, Sion and Turin become candidates. Salt Lake City wins by a narrow margin against Turin in the final round.

2008:

Candidates: Beijing, Istanbul, Madrid, Paris, Rome

Beijing comes in as the overwhelming favorite. Istanbul is eliminated in the first round, and Beijing wins the bid easily in the second round.

2010:

Candidates: Berne, Helsinki, Ostersund, Salzburg, Turin

After the 2002 games being awarded to Salt Lake City, Europe is seen as the favorite to win the 2010 games. The Salzburg bid is plagued from the beginning, such as the sliding center actually being in Germany. Before the final vote, Berne withdraws its bid due to low public support. Salzburg is eliminated in the first round, followed by Helsinki. In the final round, Ostersund pulls off a surprise victory over Turin by a narrow margin of 54-52.

2012:

Candidates: London, Madrid, Moscow, Paris, Rio de Janeiro

Because the 1996 games were moved out of Europe to North America, Europe is heavily favored to win the 2012 games. The United States does not submit a bid because North America hosted two games in a row fairly recently. Rio de Janeiro begins its campaign to get the first Olympics in South America and manages to get its self onto the short list. In the absence of the 2002 Salt Lake bribery scandal, the French are able to use this to their advantage. Moscow is dropped in the first round followed by Rio de Janeiro and Madrid. In the final round, Paris edges out London by a margin of 54-50.

2014:

Candidate: PyeongChang, Salzburg, Sochi, Vancouver

The Russians launch a grand and elaborate bid for the 2014 Winter Games, which some refer to as the “Winter Olympic Beijing.” The Canadians put forth a good effort, but many think it’s not enough. Once again, Salzburg is eliminated in the first round, followed by PyeongChang. In the final round, Sochi edges out Vancouver in a 49-47 margin. But a little bit over a year later, Russia invades South Ossetia, Georgia and international pressure forces the IOC to move the games to Vancouver in September 2008.

2016:

Candidates: Chicago, Madrid, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo

With the 2014 games recently being moved to Vancouver, Chicago went from being the favorite to win, to having no chance at all and is eliminated in the first round. Madrid is eliminated next due to the economic downturn. Rio expanded their bid plans for 2012 to bring the first Olympics to South America and is successful, defeating Tokyo 59-39.

2018:

Candidates: Annecy, Madrid, PyeongChang, Sochi

Sochi submits another bid after having the 2014 games revoked. Sochi is eliminated first because of the stigma of the 2014 games. Annecy is eliminated next because of the Paris 2012 victory. Munich defeats PyeongChang in the final round, 50-45.

2020:

Candidates: Istanbul, London, Madrid, Moscow, Tokyo

Because of the Anti-gay legislation in Russia, the IOC suspends Russia’s membership, dropping Moscow as a candidate. Istanbul attempts to copy Rio 2016’s method of trying to get the first Olympics in the Arab World. In the first round, Madrid is dropped due to economic concerns, followed by Istanbul due to political tensions. London and Tokyo are left in the final round, with London beating out Tokyo 54-41.

1996: Athens (Los Angeles)

1998: Salt Lake City (Innsbruck)

2000: Toronto

2002: Nagano

2004: Sydney

2006: Salt Lake City

2008: Beijing

2010: Ostersund

2012: Paris

2014: Sochi (Vancouver)

2016: Rio de Janeiro

2018: Munich

2020: London

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Right OK, what would've happened if JAS hadn't fixed the 92 elections...

Winter 92 - Falun

Summer 92 - Paris

Winter 94 - Salt Lake City

Summer 96 - Melbourne

Winter 98 - Torino

Summer 00 - London

Winter 02 - Nagano

Summer 04 - Beijing

Winter 06 - Munich

Summer 08 - New York City

Winter 10 - Oslo

Summer 12 - Madrid

Winter 14 - Vancouver

Summer 16 - Rio

Winter 18 - Almaty

Summer 20 - Tokyo

Winter 22 - France somewhere :lol:

I have been working on my guesses for this for the past three days. It was the perfect way to procrastinate from studying for finals!

1996:

Candidates: Athens, Atlanta, Belgrade, Manchester, Melbourne, Toronto

Athens is elected the host of the 1996, narrowly beating out Atlanta 51-35. Due to budget concerns and construction of venues and infrastructure falling far behind, the IOC revokes the 1996 games from Athens and places them in 1984 host, Los Angeles in October of 1993.

1998:

Candidates: Aosta, Jaca, Nagano, Ostersund, Salt Lake City

After the United States was defeated in the 1996 bid, they came on strong with the 1998 bid with Salt Lake City, Utah. Salt Lake City wins the bid in the first round of voting. Because of the 1996 games being put in Los Angeles, in October 1993, the USOC is forces to give up the 1998 Winter Games in November of 1993. The IOC places the 1998 Winter Games in 1976 host, Innsbruck, Austria.

2000:

Candidates: Beijing, Istanbul, New York, Sydney, Toronto

The election of the 2000 Summer Olympics was help in September of 1993, one month before the 1996 games were moved to Los Angeles. Many see Beijing as the initial front runner, but after the candidate city visits, Beijing receives a low score which all but kills their chances. New York, Sydney and Toronto are seen as the front runners with New York leading with a slight advantage. Istanbul is eliminated first, followed by Beijing. Sydney is eliminated in the third round leaving New York and Toronto in the final round. Toronto pulls a surprising defeat over New York in a 46-42 vote.

2002:

Candidates: Muju, Nagano, Ostersund, Salt Lake City, Sion

Going into the 104th IOC session, the IOC was split between two camps: Those who wanted to see Salt Lake City win, and those who thought that North America had hosted enough times already. In the end, Salt Lake City did not have enough support. Nagano defeats Sion in the final vote.

2004:

Candidates: Buenos Aires, Cape Town, Rome, Stockholm, Sydney

After losing the 2000 by a surprise victory for Toronto, Sydney comes back with a stronger bid, but faces stiff competition from Rome. Despite the competition, Sydney defeats Rome in the final round.

2006:

Candidates: Helsinki, Klagenfurt, Poprad-Tatry, Salt Lake City, Sion, Turin, Zakopane

Because no bribery scandal came out because of the 2002 Salt Lake bid, the weird 1999 candidate selection process never takes place. Helsinki, Salt Lake City, Sion and Turin become candidates. Salt Lake City wins by a narrow margin against Turin in the final round.

2008:

Candidates: Beijing, Istanbul, Madrid, Paris, Rome

Beijing comes in as the overwhelming favorite. Istanbul is eliminated in the first round, and Beijing wins the bid easily in the second round.

2010:

Candidates: Berne, Helsinki, Ostersund, Salzburg, Turin

After the 2002 games being awarded to Salt Lake City, Europe is seen as the favorite to win the 2010 games. The Salzburg bid is plagued from the beginning, such as the sliding center actually being in Germany. Before the final vote, Berne withdraws its bid due to low public support. Salzburg is eliminated in the first round, followed by Helsinki. In the final round, Ostersund pulls off a surprise victory over Turin by a narrow margin of 54-52.

2012:

Candidates: London, Madrid, Moscow, Paris, Rio de Janeiro

Because the 1996 games were moved out of Europe to North America, Europe is heavily favored to win the 2012 games. The United States does not submit a bid because North America hosted two games in a row fairly recently. Rio de Janeiro begins its campaign to get the first Olympics in South America and manages to get its self onto the short list. In the absence of the 2002 Salt Lake bribery scandal, the French are able to use this to their advantage. Moscow is dropped in the first round followed by Rio de Janeiro and Madrid. In the final round, Paris edges out London by a margin of 54-50.

2014:

Candidate: PyeongChang, Salzburg, Sochi, Vancouver

The Russians launch a grand and elaborate bid for the 2014 Winter Games, which some refer to as the “Winter Olympic Beijing.” The Canadians put forth a good effort, but many think it’s not enough. Once again, Salzburg is eliminated in the first round, followed by PyeongChang. In the final round, Sochi edges out Vancouver in a 49-47 margin. But a little bit over a year later, Russia invades South Ossetia, Georgia and international pressure forces the IOC to move the games to Vancouver in September 2008.

2016:

Candidates: Chicago, Madrid, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo

With the 2014 games recently being moved to Vancouver, Chicago went from being the favorite to win, to having no chance at all and is eliminated in the first round. Madrid is eliminated next due to the economic downturn. Rio expanded their bid plans for 2012 to bring the first Olympics to South America and is successful, defeating Tokyo 59-39.

2018:

Candidates: Annecy, Madrid, PyeongChang, Sochi

Sochi submits another bid after having the 2014 games revoked. Sochi is eliminated first because of the stigma of the 2014 games. Annecy is eliminated next because of the Paris 2012 victory. Munich defeats PyeongChang in the final round, 50-45.

2020:

Candidates: Istanbul, London, Madrid, Moscow, Tokyo

Because of the Anti-gay legislation in Russia, the IOC suspends Russia’s membership, dropping Moscow as a candidate. Istanbul attempts to copy Rio 2016’s method of trying to get the first Olympics in the Arab World. In the first round, Madrid is dropped due to economic concerns, followed by Istanbul due to political tensions. London and Tokyo are left in the final round, with London beating out Tokyo 54-41.

1996: Athens (Los Angeles)

1998: Salt Lake City (Innsbruck)

2000: Toronto

2002: Nagano

2004: Sydney

2006: Salt Lake City

2008: Beijing

2010: Ostersund

2012: Paris

2014: Sochi (Vancouver)

2016: Rio de Janeiro

2018: Munich

2020: London

I think had Samerach not fixed the 1992 elections, Paris would host the ’92 summer games, and Sofia would host the ’92 winter games. Maybe then people would be able to remember the ’92 winter games. In this case, in my scanerio, the 2012 games would have gone to London and the 2020 games would have gone to Tokyo. Not much change from reality. Makes you think that if Athens had won the 1996 games, would anything really have changed?

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Great list - you had a similar vision to 1996 to what I have had. Except, I put Athens co-hosting 1996 with Barcelona.

Just one thing - I see no reason why, if Athens gives up 1996 and it be reallocated to Los Angeles, why the US should then have to give up SLC 1998. I'd say in that scenario the US could host 1996/1998 back-to-back. Its not their fault Greece couldn't get its **** together! :)


I think had Samerach not fixed the 1992 elections, Paris would host the ’92 summer games, and Sofia would host the ’92 winter games. Maybe then people would be able to remember the ’92 winter games. In this case, in my scanerio, the 2012 games would have gone to London and the 2020 games would have gone to Tokyo. Not much change from reality. Makes you think that if Athens had won the 1996 games, would anything really have changed?

If Athens had won 1996, I'm not entirely such that much would have changed. SLC would have got 1998, Sydney might still have got 2000, perhaps Ostersund in 2002 before the US in 2004 (Dallas? Atlanta? Chicago? NY?)


In fact, if Greece got its Centennial in 1996 - it would have worked out quite nicely that the Americans get to celebrate theirs in 2004.

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Great list - you had a similar vision to 1996 to what I have had. Except, I put Athens co-hosting 1996 with Barcelona.

Just one thing - I see no reason why, if Athens gives up 1996 and it be reallocated to Los Angeles, why the US should then have to give up SLC 1998. I'd say in that scenario the US could host 1996/1998 back-to-back. Its not their fault Greece couldn't get its **** together! :)

If Athens had won 1996, I'm not entirely such that much would have changed. SLC would have got 1998, Sydney might still have got 2000, perhaps Ostersund in 2002 before the US in 2004 (Dallas? Atlanta? Chicago? NY?)

In fact, if Greece got its Centennial in 1996 - it would have worked out quite nicely that the Americans get to celebrate theirs in 2004.

I guess I should enplane the process that went on inside my head while determining this. When playing the "what if" game, I usually don't think of how things would have been if it was really in this universe, I tend to escape to my own universe when I have named "Grantopia" or I guess here it should be referred to as "Nemotopia". By doing this I can create different situations that allow me to make it so that many different things could happen. So in the case of the 1998 games, I think the reason I moved the games from Salt Lake City to Innsbruck as a way to make diversity in the hosting cities/nations, and also to create some drama. I have to admit, sometimes the I think the IOC could use a little bit of drama instead of being so PC all the time. This also gives me the opportunity to see what I would have liked as a host city get the chance to host, despite facing stiff competition, such as the case in which the 2014 games are moved from Sochi to Vancouver, or the Russians being suspended from the IOC.

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1996: Athens (Los Angeles)

1998: Salt Lake City (Innsbruck)

2000: Toronto

2002: Nagano

2004: Sydney

2006: Salt Lake City

2008: Beijing

2010: Ostersund

2012: Paris

2014: Sochi (Vancouver)

2016: Rio de Janeiro

2018: Munich

2020: London

Here's my question here though.. if Salt Lake had won 1998, and with what sounds like an impending move to Los Angeles for the `96 Olympics, why is New York even in the running for 2000? And if Salt Lake is removed from hosting 1998 as a result (which IMO wouldn't happen), now they're being asked to bid again, but they lose 2002? I don't think so.

Once again, far be it from me to decide how this game is played, but I thought the whole point of this was to predict how things actually would turn out given a twist or turn in Olympic hosting history. It seems like a lot of people want to introduce new variables that don't always make sense.

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Once again, far be it from me to decide how this game is played, but I thought the whole point of this was to predict how things actually would turn out given a twist or turn in Olympic hosting history. It seems like a lot of people want to introduce new variables that don't always make sense.

Which is why I always find such "excercises" rather pointless, IMHO. Even if it is just for some fun 'alternate history'. Kinda like the "100 year host city" threads. Whats the point in those. It is what it Olympic is.

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OK, here's an interesting premise. IF Athens had won the Games for 1996, then how do you think the succeeding sites (bor both Summer and Winter) would've been chosen -- and give you reasons why. Part of your answers/scenario must include the 2nd winning city of that year, in the whole equation. Here's my take:

1996 - Athens edges out Atlanta.

2000 - a 3-way race between Atlanta, Beijing and Sydney. I think Games would still have gone to Sydney.

2004 - race between Atlanta, Beijing and Rome. They go to Atlanta.

2008 - 2 way between Beijing and Rome. Beijing wins in inasmuch as the last Summer Games in Asia were 20 years earlier, in Seoul in1988 whereas 2 consecutive ones were held in Europe: 1992 and 1996.

2012 - Rome and Paris - probably Paris since Rome only had it in 1960.

Bets, gentlemen?

I don't think the USOC would have stuck with Atlanta. I think it would have gone down like this:

1996 - Athens

2000 - Sydney VS Beijing VS New York City, Sydney wins

2004 - Beijing VS Rome, Beijing wins

2008 - New York City VS Toronto, New York City wins (bid becomes a catalyst after 9/11)

2012 - Paris VS London VS Rome VS Madrid, London wins

2016 - Tokyo VS Madrid VS Rio VS Istanbul, Tokyo wins

2020 - Istanbul VS Rio VS Madrid, Rio wins

2024 - Durban VS Istanbul VS Rome VS Paris VS Madrid, Paris wins

2028 - Capetown VS Baku VS Dubai, Capetown wins

2032 - Toronto VS New York City VS Dubai, Toronto wins

2036 - ?

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I don't think the USOC would have stuck with Atlanta. I think it would have gone down like this:

1996 - Athens

2000 - Sydney VS Beijing VS New York City, Sydney wins

But see, you've totally IGNORED the original parameters of this thread. You have to include the city that actually won in one year...but in this Games, becomes the frontrunner (and possible winner) in the 2nd round. Read the thread from the start...

There has to be a linkage between one round and the next...-- NOT just because you want to.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's mine, and forgive me if there's lack of accuracy as I haven't studied those classic bids not even their issues thoroughly:

1996: Athens victorious by a single vote over Atlanta being the squeeziest margin ever known. Atlanta is called out from further bidding

1998: Nagano wins by 33 votes over Salt Lake City, making it the largest gap of votes casted in IOC history. Jaca is called out from further bidding.

2000: Alongside the cities that were in the shortlist, Miami, New Delhi, Manila, Caracas, and Copenhagen respectively. Sydney, Istanbul, Berlin, and Caracas were the only eliminated cities in the session. After a last-minute push by the people, Miami wins by 16 votes over Berlin

2002: Salt Lake City was expelled by the IOC after a fraudulent scheme was uncovered the year before. According to the shortlist, Ostersund ousted Sion and Quebec City with an 18-vote gap between the cities

2004: Athens opted not to reconsider themselves for the games due to economic uncertainty, Therefore, Rome, Cape Town, San Juan, Lille, and St. Petersburg were the ones in the shortlist. Rome and Lille were tied in the first round. Lille was eliminated advancing Rome to the next round, and again Rome ties with St. Petersburg and the Italian capital now suffered its fate. With Cape Town, St. Petersburg, and San Juan on the final stretch. With San Juan eliminated on round 5, Cape Town wins by 8 votes St. Petersburg

2006: Alongside Torino and Sion, Helsinki, Klagenfurt, Zakopane, and Poprad-Tatry made the shortlist, thus creating an all-European battle between the cities. Torino, Klagenfurt, and Zakopane were all eliminated on the first round, creating a massive confusion by the voters, thus prompting Samaranch to form an inquiry commission on the next session. Sion became victorious on round 2 after ousting Helsinki and Poprad-Tatry with 61, 41, and 16 votes respectively

2008: Having Osaka bidding for the 2010 Asian Games, the city council voted against bidding for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. Istanbul, Toronto, Havana, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Paris, Beijing, Berlin, London, Auckland, Mexico City, Seoul, Buenos Aires, Singapore, Lausanne, and Lisbon have became the biggest shortlist in IOC history. With a concern that the voting can get longer than the 5-round maximum, the IOC decided to go with an elimination bracket method. The first round of vote is the Round of 16. Istanbul, London, Seoul, Beijing, Havana, Bangkok, Singapore, and Mexico City advanced to the Quarterfinals, in which Istanbul again leads, as well Bangkok, Seoul, and Mexico City. The semi-finals corresponded to both Istanbul and Seoul, and in the Final Round (Sorry, no third place playoffs!) Istanbul wins 71 to 55

2010: Jaca returns after a decade-long moratorium, competing with Vancouver, Pyeongchang, Salzburg, Sochi, Harbin, and Berne. Sarajevo was meant to bid, but no reason the IOC revoked their bid. Berne, Vancouver, and Sochi were eliminated in the first three rounds, giving Harbin the win in a surprise vote against Pyeongchang, Salzburg, and Jaca respectively.

2012: London being Eliminated at the first round after a tiebreaker with NY, in which consecutively was also eliminated with Paris. Madrid and Moscow were down to the wire. Madrid wins.

2014: Aosta returns to compete with Sofia, Jaca, Vancouver, Pyeongchang, Almaty, and Seattle. In a surprise first ballot, Vancouver wins

2016: Paris is bidding with Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro, Chicago, Santo Domingo, Prague, and Lima, a tie between Tokyo and Lima encourages the Japanese city to advance to the next round, and subsequently with Rio de Janeiro, Chicago, and Santo Domingo. Tokyo defeats Prague by 21 votes

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Pyeongchang was reluctant to bid for 2018. So I doubt that they would've been able to stomach a fourth, consecutive bid. Especially after them seeing Tokyo win 2020. Granted, it could've been Asia 2020/2022 instead, but I still doubt that the South Koreans would've want to give it another go after three straight loses & just given up (much like Madrid's case).

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Do you reckon IF Munich had won 2018, would PyeongChang HAVE Bid for 2022, hoping 4th time lucky or would they HAVE given up?

Probably depends on how close they came. They lost 2010 by 3 votes and 2014 by 4 votes. If they had lost another close one to Munich followed by Tokyo winning 2022, tough to tell if they would have had it in them for another. Of course, the flipside to that argument is that with 2 straight WOG in Europe, perhaps they takes Oslo and Krakow out of the game for 2022 and strengthens China's resolve, plus perhaps it would have encouraged the USOC to throw their hat into the ring for 2022.

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Pyeongchang was reluctant to bid for 2018. So I doubt that they would've been able to stomach a fourth, consecutive bid. Especially after them seeing Tokyo win 2020. Granted, it could've been Asia 2020/2022 instead, but I still doubt that the South Koreans would've want to give it another go after three straight loses & just given up (much like Madrid's case).

According to Wikipedia (I know it's not a reliable source, hence why I said according to Wikipedia, Madrid won't Bid again until 2028, 2032 or 2036. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2028_Summer_Olympics

)

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