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Lucky American Greenback?


Guardian

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What are the chances that ONE lucky charm would give the holder Olympic gold for a couple of decades to three different people? According to this IOC article, this lucky charm is none other than an American $1 bill.

Starts with the Olympic gold medalist in equestrian show-jumping at Mexico City 1968: Bill Steinkraus of the United States. He was reported to have started the idea that the American greenback he had in his pocket gave him the luck to win that gold medal. He kept it, until he gave it to Pierre Durand of France. That showjumper competed at Seoul 1988 and guess what? He won the Olympic gold medal there. After that, in Athens for the 2004 Olympic Games, he then handed that American dollar to Brazilian showjumper: Rodrigo Pessoa. Even though he got the silver medal initially, he got the gold medal in the end. That was due to the disqualification of the former Athens 2004 gold medalist Cian O'Connor.

IOC: A Lucky Dollar For Three Exceptional Horsemen

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Ah sportspeople _ so, so superstitious.

What's the story again of the Canadian "Lucky Loonie"?

At the Salt Lake City Olympics, the ice at the ice hockey venue was made by a Canadian team, who placed some Canadian money in the ice, including a loonie under the middle circle. And since Canada won both Hockey gold medal, it became tradition that Canadians put a loonie in about every sports structure that will host an international event, as a good luck charm.

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At the Salt Lake City Olympics, the ice at the ice hockey venue was made by a Canadian team, who placed some Canadian money in the ice, including a loonie under the middle circle. And since Canada won both Hockey gold medal, it became tradition that Canadians put a loonie in about every sports structure that will host an international event, as a good luck charm.

Not every structure, fox334. I think it was going to be a "one time deal." That lucky Canadian loonie in SLC 2002 was put there by an Edmontonian ice maker. He wanted to bring his idea of team support by doing that. It almost never happened at first because the Salt Lake organizers saw what occurred and ordered him to take it out. Instead, he "hid" it further down the ice surface. When the Canadian women's ice hockey team won the gold medal match, they almost unintentionally gave the secret away by pointing their fingers at the "dark spot" smack in the middle of the SLC logo on the ice. Of course, the secret was never revealed and the rest is history. I think it was a repeat performance as well at Torino 2006, but I am not quite sure of that. You see, I have a legal minted "lucky Canadian loonie" at home, compliments of the Canadian Mint that wanted to show its support to the Canadian team then by making them for ordinary Canadians to have as regular pocket change.

As for that lucky American greenback, it is currently on a temporary loan by Pessoa to the Olympic Museum at Lausanne. It will be interesting, if Pessoa will use it for Beijing 2008 or give it to some other showjumper in another future Olympic Games.

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