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mr.x
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There wern't any design plans for Broadway/City Hall Station.  I couldn't find any online and I'm too lazy to go to the Canada Line Information Centre.  Does anybody have any?

Also, would the Broadway/City Hall Station include room for future expansion of the Millenium Line?

I'll post both the Broadway/City Hall, Yaletown, Robson, and Waterfront Station platforms later tonight.....they're all spectacular.

Yes, the Broadway/City Hall Station configuration will allow LRT/SkyTrain over the Canada Line on Broadway.  The station is also built in a way so that a future underground connection to the M-Line station can be made, if the M-Line extension is undergrond.

The problem though is the station entrance.  Being that the Canada Line will be finished late 2009 and at the earliest the M-Line extension would open in 2015, the Canada Line could drive up land prices around Broadway and Cambie and could also create mass redevelopment......meaning problems for a entrance to the M-Line Station.......unless both the Canada Line Station shares entrances with the M-Line, which is highly unlikely......or the M-Line station located half a block away or more from the Canada Line.

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Broadway/City Hall Station

Clear, simple forms, are carefully detailed in a common composite structural system. Repetitive elements are designed to maximize the benefits of each material while minimizing construction costs and enhancing the experience of daily travelers.

Concrete, metal and wood reflect upon the robust heritage of Vancouver and British Columbia and allude to the natural progression from the mass of the earth to the tracery of the forest canopy above.

On a gentle ramp, travelers descend from West Broadway to

the concourse level of the station. Upon exit, they can enjoy

a view of the downtown and North Shore mountains.

Generous windows maximize visual accessibility and light,

while all information and ticket devices can be easily located

along the sky lit east wall.

Within the large station volume, the concourse provides

retail opportunity as well as a commanding view of arriving

trains and both platforms below . At grade, bicycle lockers

are provided on the south end of the station where possible

landscaping connects to the garden of Vancouver City Hall

and the proposed boulevard trees along Cambie Street.

The precise location of the station platform is to be finalized.

The roof plays off the slope of Cambie Street, opening to the view of the downtown and North Shore. It tilts up southward to allow access to natural light, while canting up to Cambie as a welcoming gesture to pedestrians.

The experience of entry is enhanced by a skylight that bathes the concrete wall behind the ticket machines. Additional light provided by abundant windows helps ease the transition between the platforms below and the sidewalks above.

In response to urban design panel input, aesthetic commonality with the False Creek South station has been strengthened as well as with other stations along the Cambie corridor.

An upward slope at the south end of the roof increases the amount of natural light penetrating into the concourse ticketing area. The head house design helps establish a civic presence and

accommodates access opportunities to the adjacent future

development site to the east.

Grade Level

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Concourse Level

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Platform Level

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False Creek South Station

Form and structure refer to the local legacy of sawmills

and shipbuilding, while the long glass façade maximizes

visual access. The simple building form moderates

between the scales of the Cambie Bridge and future

development.

Glazed openings in the north wall provide visual links to

the neighbourhoods of False Creek.

An overlook from entry level, combined with a skylight

provide direct light into the concourse level as well as

down the escalator, deep into the station. This enhances

the transition from platform to grade and back. As the

day progresses, the light changes, illuminating the

station in a myriad of ways.

Experience is through the senses: visual poetics of

natural light, contrasting textures and acoustic

properties of the building’s materials.

Grade Level

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Concourse Level

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Platform Level

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That's beauty.  Broadway/City Hall is just beautiful.  Imange you are a visitor in Vancouver, and as you walk up to Broadway Street inside the station, you have a stunning view of Vancouver Downtown.  It is stations like these that make Vancouver such a beautiful place.

False Creak South looks okay.  I thought it can improve that platform design.  looks a little small, similar to the size of platform on 29th Ave. Station (EXPO LINE).  

'Mr. X', where do you get all these plans and designs?  (I would go to the Canada Line Information Centre but I'm too lazy).  Does anybody else know where to find designs on the Downtown stations (YALETOWN, ROBSON, WATERFRONT).  

Thank you for those who placed pictures of stations regarding the Canada Line.

Please excuse any spelling/statement errors I have made in the statement(s) above.

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The downtown stations aren't as 'strinking' as I expected.  Quite frankly, I'm dissapointed.  Especially the Waterfront Station Design.  I thought it should have a more 'direct' transition and connection to the Expo/Millenium Line.  The Robson and Yaletown Stations are okay... but horrible compared to the compromsing Broadway/City Hall Station.

I hope that the YVR, Richmond, and Broadway/Ctiy Hall Stations would look nice.  Then again, I don't have too much faith in Translink.  =P

Please excuse any spelling/statement mistakes I have made in the above statement(s).

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The downtown stations aren't as 'strinking' as I expected.  Quite frankly, I'm dissapointed.  Especially the Waterfront Station Design.  I thought it should have a more 'direct' transition and connection to the Expo/Millenium Line.  The Robson and Yaletown Stations are okay... but horrible compared to the compromsing Broadway/City Hall Station.

I hope that the YVR, Richmond, and Broadway/Ctiy Hall Stations would look nice.  Then again, I don't have too much faith in Translink.  =P

Please excuse any spelling/statement mistakes I have made in the above statement(s).

The Waterfront Station design has capabilities for future direct connections to the Expo Line station, but for now I think it's good enough that there's a direct underground connection from the C.P. Rail Station Atrium/Hall.  I personally like all of the Downtown Station designs, especially with the tight timeline and budget we're working with:

These designs aren't all too spectacular because of budget.  Cutbacks have been made to the line already, including much shorter station platforms (from 80 metres to 40-50 metres/station)...which shaved off $200-300 million from the project, ahead of looming cost increases to materials and labour.

Another reason, the line is being designed by both the public sector, Translink, and private sector, SNC-Lavalin consortium (InTransitBC).  The requests of InTransitBC also have to made, afterall by the end this project is completed they will be on the tab for probably more than $1 billion of Canada Line construction costs (they are responsible for all shortfalls).  So this line is very much unlike the Millennium Line, which was designed by Translink with every interest reflected on the needs of the public.

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True, they have made many cost cutbacks to the Canada Line.  Personally, I would have prefered Translink to be actually constructing the line and allow Vancouver/BC Architecture Firms to design each of the different stations, like the Millenium Line.  I think it adds a more 'BC Flare' and personal touch to each of the stations.

As for the Downtown Stations, I hope they would look nice although currently, YVR Terminal (which I have seen in the beginnning posts [dont' know if that is really is]) and Broadway/City Hall are my favorites.  Is there any detailed artist renderings of Richmond Center?

Would the Waterfront Station include more space so that they can expand this line to North Vancouver in the future (this would happen probably like 2025 or past)?

Thank you.  Please excuse any spelling/statement errors I have made in the above statement(s).

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I too would prefer this to be a public sector project.  And actually, local architecture firms are designing different segments of the line.    The Canada Line is divided into 6 segments: Downtown, Cambie North, Cambie South, Bridgeport/OMC, YVR, and Richmond City Centre.  Each segment's station has been contracted to different local firms and each segment will have its own theme and style.

Regarding the YVR Terminus renderings, the real thing designs will be out either tomorrow or Wednesday.  Richmond No.3 Road will be out mid next week.

Unfortunately, Waterfront Station will not allow an extension of the line to the North Shore.  There's only 50 metres or so north of the station before it would hit C.P. Station (SkyTrain, Seabus, WCE).  HOWEVER, the Richmond City Centre Terminus would allow a southern extension.

A extension to the North Shore is a neccessity.  I can't stand the Seabus: it's soooo slow and the frequency is incredibly low.  A expansion would bring heaps of commuters into transit and out of their cars......Lions Gate Bridge and Second Narrows would be much less congested.  I was thinking of a T-shaped line for the North Shore.  From C.P. Station to the North Shore, where it would then branch out into Westbound and Eastbound (towards Central West Vancouver and Central North Vancouver).

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if there was to be rail transit to the north shore, i would expect it to begin with a subway line under lonsdale avenue to probably the transcanada/upper levels (with of course, a park and ride) with a surface line or futures skytrain line following the BCR tracks, probably from about the second narrows to about Park Royal. with yet another park and ride at park royal.
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Yeah true, there isn't enough space for the Canada Line to descend so that it won't hit the CP Rail lines.  

What I think they should really do in the downtown stations is provide underground tunnels to different streets so that you have different entrances and exits, similar to the MTR (though MTR stations are HUGE).  

I would prefer the Millennium Line Extension built before the 'North Shore SkyTrain' because I would be taking UBC Masters Degree then.  Benefits me!  =D

For some reason, I didn't really like the look of the Canada Line Train being silver.  I prefered the MKII Train look.  Seems more natural in my opinion.  I also prefered the Canada Line to use the Expo and Millennium Line Tracks but I guess they needed the train to have more room for the passangers from the Airport.

Did anyone read the Province yesterday about the transit fare system?!!! I WAS SO MAD WHEN I READ IT.  HOW CAN THEY DO THS?!!!! TRANSLINK IS LOSING MONEY EVERY YEAR BECAUSE OF TURNSTILES!!!  I WOULD IMAGINE THEM LOSING AT LEAST DOUBLE THE PRICE (I would cheat too if I had to go to Surrey)!  

Thank you.  Please remember to post the station designs 'mr. x'.  I'm really excited to see them.  Thank you in advance.

Please excuse my spelling/statment mistakes I have made in the above statement(s).

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1) Yea, I agree.  We need more station entrances.....but there will be two for Waterfront Station, a future second entrance to Robson Station from Pacific Centre, a future second entrance for Broadway Station, a future second entrance for Oakridge Station.

2) I too would prefer the M-Line UBC extension over the North Shore extension.  Construction will probably start something after 2013.

3) The Mark train shells are made of plastic, which is why they are white.  The Rotem trains are stainless steel, which explains why the trains are so much heavier and are shiny grey.  Maybe I shouldn't judge it right away, afterall it's just one rendering.

4) The Expo and M-Line used technology called linear motors, which involves a third rail which supplies trains with power, rotating wheels, and a magnectic strip on the track which drags the train.  The Rotem trains however are basically standard rail technology, involve a lot of moving parts on the train.  Linear motors cost much more than rotary motors.

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May 09, 2006

Canada Line station names selected

Translink | News Release

TransLink has merged input from Vancouver and Richmond with technical conventions for naming rapid transit stations to determine the names for the 16 Canada Line stations scheduled to open in November 2009.

Station names are chosen primarily to provide passengers with wayfinding information they need for connecting transit services, which was the case when SkyTrain stations on the Expo and Millennium Line were named. Over time, however, some communities or key destinations were included in station names to enhance information for transit customers and to establish the stations as focal points in the community. For example, the Expo Line's Main Street station became "Main Street / Science World," the Joyce Station was renamed "Joyce / Collingwood" and Stadium was transformed to "Stadium / Chinatown."

The same approach will be evident in the names chosen for Canada Line stations.

Waterfront Station: maintaining the name of Vancouver's major transit hub, served by SeaBus, West Coast Express, the Canada Line, Expo and Millennium Lines, and Coast Mountain Bus services.

Vancouver City Centre: the Canada Line station between Robson Street and West Georgia Street.

Yaletown - Roundhouse: adds reference to the Roundhouse Community Centre, an important piece of Vancouver's transportation history and a neighbourhood focal point, to the original name.

Olympic Village: serving the False Creek South area at 2nd Avenue and Cambie, and near the site of the Athlete's Village for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. Use of 'Olympic Village' as a station name is subject to an acceptable license agreement being concluded between the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and Translink and the approval of such license agreement by the International Olympic Committee.

Broadway - City Hall: the intersection with a major east/west corridor and 99B bus route; also reflecting the proximity to Vancouver City Hall.

King Edward: the intersection with King Edward Avenue; again, an important east/west transit route.

Oakridge - 41st Avenue: identifies the neighbourhood, the shopping centre and an important cross street on the transit system.

Langara - 49th Avenue: combines the name of the community and the college with an important transit route.

Marine Drive: notes the significant intersection with Marine Drive and the bus loop proposed for this station.

Bridgeport: the station that will be the key transit connection and park and ride in Richmond for the Canada Line service from Richmond to Vancouver, Canada Line service to Vancouver International Airport, and highway coach services from Ladner, Delta, South Surrey and White Rock.

Aberdeen: reflective of the neighbourhood; the intersection is Cambie, but reference to that street could result in confusion with Cambie Street in Vancouver."

Lansdowne: references the location of the station at Lansdowne, which will be an important east/west corridor in Richmond

Richmond - Brighouse: incorporates an important historic name in Richmond to the station at the city's centre.

On Sea Island, the Vancouver International Airport Authority will name its three Canada Line stations Templeton, Sea Island Centre and YVR - Airport. The naming of future stations at 33rd Avenue and 57th Avenue in Vancouver as well as a fourth station on Sea Island has been deferred until construction on them proceeds.

The Canada Line rapid transit system will run fully separated from traffic between Waterfront Centre in Vancouver to the heart of Richmond and to Vancouver International Airport. The line will provide the equivalent of 10 road lanes of capacity to move people on the region's busiest north/south corridor and will be an important new link in TransLink's regional transportation network.

The project is a funding partnership of the Governments of Canada and British Columbia, TransLink, Vancouver International Airport Authority and InTransit BC, the consortium that will design, build, operate, maintain and partially finance the line. Canada Line Rapid Transit Inc., a subsidiary of TransLink, manages the Project. For complete details on the project, visit www.canadaline.ca

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The new station names are offically up on the Canada Line Website (http://www.canadaline.ca/).  Here is a screenshot I took on my PC:

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The following information is about the Station Designs on Sea Island Only.  Please note that Bridgeport Station has the exact same design.

PS: I felt really stupid after I found the station designs on the Canada Line.  If you want to go see them on PDF yourself, go to http://www.canadaline.ca/, select Public Consulation, then Detailed Designs, then select 'second round of open houses', and then select the differet PDF files to view information regarding the segment stations.

Please excuse any spelling/statement errors I have made in the statements above.

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YVR - Airport Station:

The Canada Line construction theme is land, sea, and sky.  The Sea Island stations are hoping to do just that.  Each station will allow different views of the airport and city, and will have abundant amounts of sunlight entering the station.

The Artist Rendering of the design can be found in the first or second page of this post.

More Information about the Canada Line - Sea Island stations below:

Sea Island Centre Station:

The Sea Island Centre Station would be featured at grade.  The design plans/floor plan and renderings and models are found below:

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More Information, visit http://www.canadaline.ca/.  

More Information about Canada Line - Sea Island below:

Templeton Station:

I had a rendering, but I was lazy to post it.  Sorry... =P

Design Plan:

stationdesign.gif

More Information, visit http://www.canadaline.ca/

Thank you.  Please excuse any spelling/statement errors I have made in the above statement(s)

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CANADA LINE TRAIN INFORMATION

Rotem's XG EMU Intercity Type (K-Series) offers passenger convenience. Each component of XG EMU reduces the "total life cycle cost" of the vehicle by reducing the maintenance costs.

Supplier: Rotem (Hyundai Motor Group)

Model: XG EMU Intercity Type (K-Series)

Maximum Opereating Speed: 80 km/h

Maximum Design Speed: 110 km/h

Driver: Automation/Driverless

Acceleration: 1.3 m/s(2)

Jerk Limit: 0.8 m/s(3)

Service: 0.8 ~ 1.36 m/sec(2)

Emergency: 1.35 m/sec(2)

Noise level: 70 dB(A) at 80 km/h (Ground)

Line Voltage: 800 V DC  

Train Formation: [A+A] (2 vehicles per train)

End to End Journey Time: 25/26 minutes

Pasasenger Capacity: 334 per train

Seating Configuration: Side-by-side transverse, flip-up seats at wheelchair and bicycle positions

Bicycle Accommodation: 2 per train

Wheelchair Accommodation: 4 per train

Width: 3 metres

Height: 3.6 metres

Length: 41 metres per train

Weight: 76 tonnes empty

Car Body Material: Stainless Steel 301L

Interior Material: Sandwich Material with NOMEX (Honeycomb)

Propulsion & Electric Systems: TMS & VVVF Control (IGBT), AC Traction Motor, SIV: VVVF Control, IGBT

Bogie: Bolsterless Type, Rubber & Air Spring Suspension

Brake System: Regenerative + Dynamic + Friction Brake, Compressor: AC Motor Driven, Friction Brake : Wheel Mounted Disc Brake

Air Conditionning Equipment: R134a, Roof Mounted Package type, 42 kW/car

Gangway: Wide Open Gangway (high noise transmission loss)

Passenger Door: Electric Sliding Plug-in Type

Security Features: Passenger Silent Alarm, Emergency passenger-operated intercom panels, Modern vandal-resistant finishes

Information System: EIDS (Electronic Information Display System), Electronic “Destination” signs on the outside of each vehicle ("YVR-AIRPORT", "WATERFRONT", "RICHMOND"), Public Address System announcing next stations

Currently In Opereration XG EMU's: Hong Kong MTR, France, Italy

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Elevated guideway section, March 2006

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Concrete poured for elevated guideway section, March 2006

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Form for elevated guideway section, March 2006

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Middle Arm Fraser River Canada Line Bridge construction, May 2006

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Road construction, in preparation for guideway at YVR Sea Island, May 2006

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Guideway construction on Sea Island, May 2006

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At-grade guideway construction, May 2006

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Guideway construction, Sea Island, May 2006

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Site is cleared for the Operations & Maintenance Centre, May 2006

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Middle Arm Fraser River Canada Line Bridge construction, May 2006

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Middle Arm Fraser River Canada Line Bridge construction, May 2006

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Cut and cover activity, Little Mountain area, May 2006

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Cut and Cover trench, Little Mountain area, May 2006

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Cut and cover tunnel operations, Little Mountain, April 2006. Tunnel sections

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Cut and cover tunnel operations, Little Mountain, April 2006. Cast tunnel sections behind construction forms.

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Tunnel Boring Maching section move, May 2006

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Q: Would the new Canada Line turnstiles (It didn't say future fare gates for Olympic Village and Broadway City/Hall Stations so I assumed there would be turnstiles there, which seems kinda akward) and/or Fare Machines work with the Translink SmartCard project (expected to deliver in 2009)?

Q: Would the SmartCard work in busses, SkyTrain Expo & Millen. Line, SeaBus, Evergreen LRT Line, and WestCoast Express?

[if SmartCard Project is delivered in 2009]

Thanks!

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Q: Would the new Canada Line turnstiles (It didn't say future fare gates for Olympic Village and Broadway City/Hall Stations so I assumed there would be turnstiles there, which seems kinda akward) and/or Fare Machines work with the Translink SmartCard project (expected to deliver in 2009)?

Q: Would the SmartCard work in busses, SkyTrain Expo & Millen. Line, SeaBus, Evergreen LRT Line, and WestCoast Express?

[if SmartCard Project is delivered in 2009]

Thanks!

The diagrams do depict "Future Fare Gates" for the Olympic Village and Broadway-City Hall Stations.  There will be no turnstile installations on the Canada Line, however each station has been built in a way that turnstiles can be easily installed in the future.

The existing new fare machines will be used and the future "SmartCard" will work on the Canada Line.  From what I know, our SmartCard will be very similar to London's "Oyster" and Hong Kong's "Octopus" card, using magnectic sensors.  Hopefully, we'll find a more creative name than "SmartCard".

The 165 fare machines that we bought for $18 million five years ago is equipped with "Tri-Reader technology", which reads any one of three types of "SmartCards", allowing Translink the option of switching from magnetic stripe to SmartCards in the future.

The SmartCard will work on everything: bridge tolls, parking, SkyTrain, Canada Line, SeaBus, Evergreen Line, West Coast Express, etc.

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SmartCard, huh? This idea has remotely reminded me of the way the NYC's Metro mass transit system (busses, subway, etc.) uses what they call the "MetroCard" for the public to use to gain access to those transportation services. It took a few years to change the fare system there from a coin/token turnstile one to the current magnetic card idea now.
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