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mr.x
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Vancouver: Home to Canada's Largest Rapid Transit System, 2009

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Canada Line | Information Website

CONSTRUCTION IS NOW WELL UNDERWAY, WITH REVENUE SERVICE SCHEDULED TO BEGIN ON NOVEMBER 29, 2009.

What is the Canada Line?

The transportation corridor connecting downtown Vancouver with Richmond is one of the busiest in Greater Vancouver and home to one-third of the region's jobs and 20 percent of its population. The Canada Line will include 16 stations, and provision for three future stations located to serve the dense and growing neighbourhoods along the corridor. The Canada Line will provide a vital north-south link needed to help enhance the regional network, creating a safe, fast and reliable rapid transit system. The line will connect with the existing Expo and Millennium rapid transit lines, WestCoast Express and SeaBus at Waterfront Station. The Canada Line provides for a future connection with a Millennium Line extension to Broadway and Cambie Street. The project also includes a park-and-ride facility and a bus exchange at the Bridgeport Station; a second bus exchange will be provided at the Richmond Terminal Station.

The Canada Line will consist of the following:

- Underground tunnel, constructed using the cut-and-cover method, up Granville Street from Waterfront Station to Dunsmuir Street

- Twin-bored tunnel up Granville Street from Dunsmuir Street to Davie Street, and from Davie Street, under False Creek, to 2nd Avenue near Cambie

- Cut-and-cover tunnel under northbound traffic lanes of Cambie from 2nd Avenue to 63rd Avenue

- Elevated guideway from 63rd Avenue, over SW Marine Drive, then south along the west side of Cambie, over Kent Ave. to the North Arm of the Fraser River

- Elevated guideway from the North Arm of the Fraser River to Bridgeport Station in Richmond

- Elevated guideway south along the east side of No. 3 Road to the terminal at Richmond City Centre Station on No. 3 Road south of Saba Road

- Elevated guideway from Bridgeport Station west across Richmond industrial lands to the Middle Arm of the Fraser River

- Elevated guideway west across southern approach ramp of Arthur Laing Bridge, around north side of Sea Island Interchange, across Templeton Road, then west at grade, separated from traffic approximately 1.7 kilometres before finishing as an elevated guideway at YVR terminal

- The guideway will be single track rather than a double track for a 650 metre segment in the vicinity of the YVR terminal

- YVR 3 Station on Sea Island will be deferred to a future date

Why should we build the line now?

The transportation corridor connecting downtown Vancouver with downtown Richmond is one of the busiest in Greater Vancouver and home to one third of the region's jobs and 20 percent of its population. With congestion worsening, the average commuter trip time in the region has increased 36 percent in the last 10 years (from 19.5 minutes to 26.5 minutes). Projected population growth means an increased burden on existing roads and bridges, impacting not only our economy and environment but also our quality of life.

The Canada Line will provide additional capacity equivalent to 10 arterial road lanes in a dense corridor where expanding roads and bridges is neither practical nor desirable. This additional capacity will address congestion and make commutes more manageable, boosting the region's livability, sustainability and competitiveness.

Is this an Airport line?

The Canada Line is designed to be a commuter transit line. By far, the majority of the riders will be traveling between Richmond and Vancouver. The connection to the Vancouver International Airport will serve the growing employment population on Sea Island - 26,000 people work at the Airport today and this number is expected to climb to about 40,000 by 2021 - as well as passengers and tourists. The Vancouver International Airport Authority is paying for the Airport Line and is contributing to common Main Line costs.

Is this an Olympic project?

A link like the Canada Line has been planned for decades. According to earlier regional transportation plans, a line was to be completed by 2006. Olympic dates are important because if we are going to build the line now, it must be complete by 2009 in order to avoid major construction during the Games.

While Greater Vancouver and Whistler can host the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games without the line, the addition of this link to the rapid transit network makes a new and different kind of traffic planning possible for Olympic events.

With the Canada Line in place, good transit access is provided to the Vancouver City centre from all directions. Traffic planners have identified the opportunity to create an Olympic zone in the central city, with enhanced transit services and limited vehicle access. Such a traffic plan would clearly contribute to a more sustainable Winter Games. It would also help build transit ridership for the longer term and a commitment to a more environmentally friendly central city.

Financing the Project

The Governments of Canada and British Columbia, the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority (TransLink), the City of Vancouver and the Vancouver International Airport Authority are each contributing to the Canada Line. In addition, InTransitBC (private sector) will design, build, operate, maintain and partially finance the Line. The private sector will operate and maintain the line for 35 years.

Government of Canada: $450 million

Province of British Columbia: $435 million

Vancouver International Airport: $245 million

Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority: $321 million

City of Vancouver: $27 million

InTransitBC: $572 million

TOTAL: $2050 MILLION (2003$CAN)

InTransitBC, the private sector, is responsible for all shortfalls that may be incurred during the construction process.

Route Map

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Construction Schedule

Construction Milestones

September/October 2005: Construction begins

Late 2005 to Early 2007: Utility and road relocation (typically occurs prior to tunnel/guideway construction)

Late 2005 to Mid 2007: Construction of bridges over North Arm

and Middle Arm (Moray Channel) of the Fraser River

Mid 2006 to Early 2008:  Guideway construction in Richmond

Late 2005 to Mid 2008:  Staged cut-and-cover tunnel

construction along Cambie Street in Vancouver from 2nd Avenue

to 64th Avenue

Late 2006 to Mid 2008:  Cut-and-cover tunnel construction (Granville Mall north of Pender Street)

Late 2005 to Mid 2008:  Bored tunnel construction (Downtown Vancouver)

Early 2006 to Mid 2009:  Construction of stations

May 2008:  Rapid transit vehicle testing

September 2009:  Full service testing of Canada Line begins

November 2009:  Canada Line service begins

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That Canada Line will be used a lot, once it starts operation. However, I find it really bad that trees that had to be taken out to make way for the project was a subject of protest by some people. Well, once it is done, I hope the areas affected will be re-beautified as best as they can.
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That Canada Line will be used a lot, once it starts operation. However, I find it really bad that trees that had to be taken out to make way for the project was a subject of protest by some people. Well, once it is done, I hope the areas affected will be re-beautified as best as they can.

Not all of the trees will be chopped down, only 15% the trees and it's only about 300 trees.  The other 85% is being relocated and will be planted again after construction.

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I'm just curious, does Vancouver have an underground subway line? If there isn't, is there any plans of one in the distant future?

The Sky Train line from Stadium station to waterfront goes beneath the city. When it was built, they used the old Canadian Pacific tunnel that went from the CP waterfront yards to the yards at the Drake Street roundhouse. The CP yards around the roundhouse were taken out and became the Expo site.

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That Canada Line will be used a lot, once it starts operation. However, I find it really bad that trees that had to be taken out to make way for the project was a subject of protest by some people. Well, once it is done, I hope the areas affected will be re-beautified as best as they can.

Not all of the trees will be chopped down, only 15% the trees and it's only about 300 trees.  The other 85% is being relocated and will be planted again after construction.

That is very good, mr.x. It will be an inconvenience at this time, but it will be great to see the replanted trees there again.

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Here are some Canada Line construction pictures, taken mid-January 2006.  The location in these pictures are between 41st Avenue Station and King Edward Station.  This segment of the Canada Line is a decked tunnel.

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Here are more pictures of the same segment, but taken early February 2006.

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Pictures of the temporary tunnel boring machine entrance hole at the site of the False Creek South Station, taken mid-December 2005.

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They sure took a nice chunk out of Cambie Bridge

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The Canada SkyTrain Line tunnel boring machine is about to be shipped over to Vancouver by train from Ontario.  The machine is 10 metres in length and 6 metres in width.

Renderings of YVR TERMINAL STATION.

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I'm not exactly sure what these are, but what's happening at Waterfront will be exactly like the Expo Waterfront Station.  The trains pass through the station, the tracks switch to the other direction, and the train moves back onto the platform moving the other direction.
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  • 2 weeks later...

Pictures taken late-March 2006.

Cambie South (Between King Edward Station and Oakridge Station)

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Dredging and pile driving platform drilling pilings for the Middle Arm Fraser River Bridge.

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Utility relocation in Downtown Vancouver.

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Changes to Bus Service During Canada Line Construction

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Downtown Bus Service Changes

Starting April 24 there will be no vehicle traffic on Granville Street from Robson Street north, for about two years. This means changes to downtown Vancouver bus services as follows:

All Routes (.pdf)

Suburban Routes

Vancouver Routes

98 B-Line Richmond

Trolley Buses

#4

#7

#10

#16

#17

#5

#6

Standard Buses

#50 False Creek South

#15

Suburban Routes

#311

#351

#352

#354

#490

#601

#602

#603

#604

Click to enlarge map

The 50 False Creek South will travel south along Howe to Nelson, east on Nelson and then south along Granville.  The northbound trip will travel along Granville to Robson, east on Robson and north on Seymour.

The 4, 7, 10, 16 & 17 will use Seymour to travel northbound and Howe southbound.

The 5 & 6 will travel north on Seymour and south on Richards.

The 8 & 20 will travel south on Richards, west on Robson,

and then north on Seymour.

The 15 will travel west on Robson, north on Seymour, east on Pender and south on Cambie.

Changes To NightBus

All NightBus routes will terminate at new bays on Howe Street between Georgia and Hastings; the N9, N10 & N17 will travel north on Seymour and south on Howe.

Changes To Suburban Routes

There will be changes in stop locations for the 311, 351, 352, 354, 601, 602, 603 & 604 along Howe and Seymour. Please check your bus stops to make sure that you are waiting at the correct stop.

Changes To Yaletown Bus Service

Davie Street will be closed to all vehicular traffic between Hamilton Street and Pacific Boulevard. The C21 & C23 Community Shuttle services will be rerouted.

Changes To Cambie Bus Service

The northbound lanes on the east side of the Cambie St. Blvd are now closed from Marine Dr. to 54th Ave.

Changes To 98 B-Line Service in Richmond

The 98 B-Line will no longer travel in the centre busway, instead it will run in general traffic lanes both north and south along No. 3 Road.

Traffic & Street Closures

For traffic changes and street closures please visit the Canada Line website - www.canadaline.ca

Rerouted buses upset commuters

Canada Line construction: rerouted buses, new stops, and lack of information increase stress level

Jonathan Fowlie, Vancouver sun

Published: Tuesday, April 25, 2006

VANCOUVER - Downtown Vancouver was awash with wayward and frustrated transit riders Monday after TransLink began rerouting its downtown buses off Granville Street to accommodate construction for the Canada Line.

"It's been a nightmare," Shelley Stephens said as she watched fellow passengers scramble to find their new stops.

Buses that used to travel along Granville north of Robson have been rerouted along either Howe, Seymour or Richards streets. The new routes will be in effect until construction along Granville is finished, which TransLink officials say will take at least two years.

Stephens, who regularly catches the 98 B-Line on Seymour near Georgia, said her stop has gone unchanged but that throughout Monday she saw countless others fumbling with maps and chasing buses during the morning and afternoon commutes.

As Stephens spoke, one of several confused passengers arrived from a nearby office tower in search of the number 17 bus bound for Oak Street.

"This is not very good," said Sharon Montgomery, not finding her bus listed on the hand-scrawled signs mounted to a utility pole.

"There's no transit people around," she added.

Within moments, Montgomery's bus came and went without stopping, causing her to chase it down the street.

"Arrgh," she grunted as she ran down Seymour in her high heels, describing the switchover to the new routes only as, "stressful."

In hopes of mitigating confusion for travellers like Montgomery, TransLink posted numerous representatives at old bus stops along the Granville Mall to help people find their new stops.

On Monday afternoon, one of those representatives said most commuters had figured out the changes.

"Most people have seen it in the morning and figured it out," said Matt Craig, a planner with Coast Mountain Bus Company, as he stood on the edge of an eerily quiet Granville Street.

TransLink spokesman Drew Snyder added that things will get smoother as people get accustomed to the new routes and that things "should be settling down in the next couple of weeks."

While many commuters were frustrated Monday, many business owners along Granville were also worried as they saw foot traffic, and business, take a notable drop.

"I'm afraid," said Doron Levy, owner of Trees Organic Coffee, which has been open on north Granville for 10 years.

"We had a wonderful year, but now I'm worried about the future," he said, adding the street outside his cafe will soon be dug up for heavy construction.

Inside the cafe, Levy's staff said business had dropped about 20 per cent with Monday's disappearance of the bus traffic, although Levy warned it is too early to tell if that is a reliable trend or even if it is connected to the diverted buses.

The city is planning to allow northbound traffic and metered parking along the three blocks of north Granville that will not be under construction in hopes of helping people get to the business.

Owners were still skeptical, however, worried that the dust and noise of construction, along with the bus diversions will mean a drop in business.

"I may have to look for a job," said street side flower seller Christina Gomez with frustration.

"The faithful [customers] will still come but when it's noisy and dusty I don't know how faithful they are going to be," she said.

jfowlie@png.canwest.com

© The Vancouver Sun 2006

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If ya'lls want to check out some of the columns for the Canada Line, you can see a bunch of them that have already been erected in richmond.  If you go to the RiverRock Casino you can see the pillars goin up everywhere.. i was excited to see them, but i'm a bit of a weirdo.
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Hello,

I'm near here and was VERY interested in the Canada Line and Evergreen Line and came upon this fourm.  I thought it had EXCELLENT AND VERY DETAILED INFORMATION.  If I have any, I would post it up.

Currently, the Canada Line construction is starting everywhere include Sea Island, Richmond, Cambie (obviously), and False Creak.  

I was wondering if the Canada Line would have any turnstiles (which they should because Translink loses a lot of money per year (I think 6 million) because of it's current system right now).  The turnstiles should also be installed in the Expo and Millennium Line although Translink said it was too costy (costy my a**).  At least install it on the major stations like Downtown Stations, Broadway, Metrotown, Columbia, and all Surrey Stations (use it as 'a study').

I was also wondering if the Canada Line Statiosn would have like station platform doors to prevent people from falling to the rails, similar to the MTR ones (Hong Kong).  

Anyways, on to other skytrain lines.  Does anyone know when they would start on the Millennium Line Phase 2 (like to UBC stated in the Evergreen Line Presentation)?  Also, if someone has more information regarding the Evergreen Line and the Phase 2 of Millennium Line, that would be great.

Thanks!

PS: Excuse any spelling errors or statements I have made

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First of all, welcome to the forums!

I was wondering if the Canada Line would have any turnstiles (which they should because Translink loses a lot of money per year (I think 6 million) because of it's current system right now).  The turnstiles should also be installed in the Expo and Millennium Line although Translink said it was too costy (costy my a**).  At least install it on the major stations like Downtown Stations, Broadway, Metrotown, Columbia, and all Surrey Stations (use it as 'a study').
Translink had a study and it showed that the cost to operate the turnstiles wouldn't be worth it: not enough fare evasion to recoup the operation losses. Each station would require at least one person to man the turnstiles.  The stations are built now so they can easily install turnstiles in the future.

Well, turnstiles on the Millennium and Expo Line would cost a lot, especially on the Expo.  The M-Line stations are designed so that turnstiles can be installed easily, but not so with the Expo.  The Expo stations would require a major overhaul each in order to accommodate turnstiles: reconfiguring the stations so they funnel in passengers, electrical wiring, new floors, etc.  Cost for both lines: $100 million.

I agree.  At the busy and crime ridden stations, turnstiles should be installed.  The first station with turnstiles should be Commercial (30,000 passengers per day) and Broadway (50,000 passengers per day).

I was also wondering if the Canada Line Statiosn would have like station platform doors to prevent people from falling to the rails, similar to the MTR ones (Hong Kong).  

Platform doors are for only very crowded platforms and in Hong Kong's case, it's a million times worst....platform doors are also a very recent thing, brand new in the MTR.

Anyways, on to other skytrain lines.  Does anyone know when they would start on the Millennium Line Phase 2 (like to UBC stated in the Evergreen Line Presentation)?  Also, if someone has more information regarding the Evergreen Line and the Phase 2 of Millennium Line, that would be great.

Planning is currently in the works for the UBC M-Line extension (phase II).  Construction however won't likely start until after 2013.  This line is a Translink top priority.

Stay tuned to the Evergreen Line topic for more information.

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Yeah... True... It is very expensive to install turnstiles in all stations although I still think they should at least install them in Downtown and other busy stations.  

Thanks for the information.  I was just curious about the new Canada Line.  Thanks again 'mx. x'

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There wern't any design plans for Broadway/City Hall Station.  I couldn't find any online and I'm too lazy to go to the Canada Line Information Centre.  Does anybody have any?

Also, would the Broadway/City Hall Station include room for future expansion of the Millenium Line?

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