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Here's the medals!

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OC CWG Delhi 2010 unveils medals for the Games

NEW DELHI, 6 August 2010: Organising Committee Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi today unveiled the victory medals for XIX Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi. Delhi 2010 medals combine sporting excellence with fine craftsmanship.

The victory medals were unveiled by Organising Committee CWG 2010 Delhi Chairman Mr. Suresh Kalmadi, MP and Dr. Lalit K. Bhanot, Secretary General, Organising Committee Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi here at the OC headquarters.

The medals for Delhi 2010 are a product of excellence and reflect the spirit of the Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi, a testament to brilliance and success of the athletes.

“Indian athletes won 50 medals in the 2006 Games. We hope 70 of these wonderful medals will be won by Indian athletes. India finished fourth in the medal tally at Melbourne. We’re hopeful of moving to the third place this time.” said Organising Committee CWG 2010 Delhi Chairman Mr. Suresh Kalmadi, MP

“The Prime Minister has given us Rs 700 crore for training of athletes, I am confident that will reflect in India’s medal tally,” added Mr. Kalmadi.

The medal design is clean and simple and the dominant form that gives it dynamism is a rising upward spiral that starts taking shape from the plain textured base, gradually becoming the highlight of the medal. It represents the rise to glory for each athlete from struggle to their moment of glory.

The front of the medal has the Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi logo and dates. The back has the emblem of the Commonwealth Games Federation.

The medal is 6 mm thick with a diameter of 63.5 mm. The signature element’s starting fin is raised by 1 mm and it rises up to 3 mm on the last fin. The embossed logo and date is raised by 1mm.

The lanyard of the medal carries all six Games colors (pink, purple, green, red, yellow and blue) blending into each other. It is created with Delhi2010 brand and design elements.

The medal case is clean and simple with black background enhancing the logo embossed on top in Gold, Silver or Bronze - matching the medal inside. The color and simplicity of the box is keeping with the significance of the product it carries. The black base provides an appropriate background to the multi-hued lanyard and the medal itself.

OC CWG Delhi 2010 has ordered a total of 1,408 medals, which includes multiple medals for team events. The cost of producing each gold medal is Rs 5,539, while every silver medal costs Rs 4,818 and a bronze medal Rs 4,529. The total cost of producing these medals is Rs 81, 08,566 including the price of the boxes and lanyards.

Considering the various constraints in medal manufacture, Tombac Bronze (92% copper, 6% zinc and 2% nickel) was selected as base metal. This metal has the ability to flow under compressive force and allow formation of sharp and firm features in design.

The India Government Mint, Kolkata, was entrusted with the design, development and manufacture of the medals. The Image & look department of the CWG Delhi 2010 has created 4 design options for victory medals. After sampling the existing design was selected for final prototype.

The Commonwealth Games 2010 Delhi authorities had prepared 4 photographic perspective views of the medals. State of the art CNC Engraving Machines are being used for manufacturing. Sample medals took almost a month to manufacture to match the conceptual view.

Due to high projection the life of each die was very short which meant that total number of dies required for manufacture of medals are very high.

The manufacture of the medals is in full swing. The medals will be subjected to a very special process called ‘Frosting’ for generation of mat surface on the base and top surface of the letters and main design will be polished to a glossy finish. Each medal requires manual and intricate finishing bringing the conceptual artwork to reality.

CWG Delhi

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A fairly scathing op ed indictment of the ugly side of Dehli's CGs, from an Indian point of view...

India misses its chance to tackle corruption and exploitation

AMRIT DHILLON

August 10, 2010

Taking the Games off Delhi may shock the country into action.

Should the Commonwealth Games Federation cancel the Games in Delhi in October - out of horror at the corruption and inhumanity shown to the migrant workers who have slaved to build the infrastructure - it might be the shock treatment India needs.

So far, no degree of shaming within the country has worked to curb the greed of the rich and powerful. The media have tried and failed. Indian politicians and bureaucrats are beyond shame. They can be shown on national television, caught by secret cameras, stretching out their fat paws to take wads of notes as bribes, and yet still look people in the eye while claiming that the person on the film is someone else.

Maybe international shame is the only weapon left. Cancelling the Games would be so devastating to India's pride that it could turn the tide.

The corruption that has been exposed in recent weeks is obscene. Every item - from chairs, umbrellas and tissues to liquid-soap dispensers, airconditioners and treadmills - has been over-invoiced to the nth degree.

Emails have been tampered with to conceal the siphoning of money into British bank accounts. Even the records on the quality of the materials used for the buildings have been fudged to cloak the short cuts.

India now ranks 84th in the Transparency International corruption index. Corruption in the Commonwealth Games will probably prompt a lower ranking.

Clerks who work in electricity offices demand a bribe when consumers pay their bills merely to take the money and record the transaction. Postmen refuse to hand over drafts and pensions to villagers without a cash payment.

Soldiers on the inhumanly cold Siachen glacier in the Himalayas are fed food two years past its expiry date. A recent government report found that contractors take their full payment from the army but in return supply food unfit for human consumption.

But more than the corruption, it is the refusal of Indian contractors to treat labourers working on Games projects as human that constitutes a real casus belli for the Commonwealth Games Federation.

Having seen how construction workers are treated all over India, I had been hoping that the authorities might want to use the occasion to show that India can put up buildings the same way that the rest of the world does - by paying the labourers a decent wage, providing them with meals, portable toilets, temporary housing and a creche for their children. But Indian contractors simply cannot seem to find it in their hearts to treat their workers as human. It is as though to accord them respect is as preposterous as debating with a donkey.

Indians have gleefully joined the global community but are unable to adopt commonly held notions throughout the world about the fair treatment of workers.

The country believes a seat on the UN Security Council is its right as an emerging power, but somehow just cannot bring itself to subscribe to the international community of nations' belief in our common humanity.

So the estimated 415,000 contract daily-wage workers have been living in subhuman conditions because, to the contractors, they are subhuman. Unskilled workers have been paid 85 to 100 Indian rupees (about $A2) a day while skilled workers get 120 to 130 rupees for eight hours of work.

The wages contravene the official Delhi state minimum wage of 152 rupees for eight hours of work. Labourers are often told to work overtime building stadiums that, ironically, their own children will never set foot in, for no money.

When I visited the Games Village last year, work had just begun. Labourers told me they slept in dormitories with no ventilation or proper toilets and some had not been given safety helmets. When someone died - the official figure is 42 labourers since January 2009 - the dead man's friends were given train tickets and told to go back to his village to inform his family.

Workers live in cramped tin or asbestos hutments where diseases are rife. Aid organisations have cried themselves hoarse every monsoon about the deaths from malaria and dengue fever in these slums but it has made no difference.

In the denial of their humanity, there is something that smacks almost of a ''racial'' hatred towards the poor as though they belong to a different species. India wanted the Games to showcase the ''new'' India of 9 per cent growth, but how can it feel pride when every new structure has been built by destroying the workers' self-respect and dignity?

Saddest of all is that it would take just 1 per cent of the total budget of a building to provide proper facilities for workers.

On my morning walk a year ago, I used to go past a house that was being demolished to make way for apartments. Spread out on the rubble, I saw the workers' clothes drying. They slept on the rubble, washed themselves on the rubble from a pail, and cooked their piteous meals on the rubble. Soon, there would rise up apartments fitted out with marbled bathrooms, gleaming kitchens and chandeliers. I used to avert my eyes as I walked past.

The Games gave India an opportunity to renounce the callousness on display at thousands of construction sites in the country. That moment has come and gone.

Amrit Dhillon is a freelance journalist based in Delhi.

Source: The Age

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 —  —  —  —  — Forwarded message —  —  —  —  — 

From: Delhi2010 <XXXXXXX@sportsworld.co.uk>

Date: 10 August 2010 02:14

Subject: Delhi 2010 Commonwealth Games

To: Delhi2010 <XXXXXXX@sportsworld.co.uk>

Dear Commonwealth Games Enthusiast

We have just been notified by Delhi 2010 Organising Committee that only the Opening and Closing Ceremonies will have reserved seating. All tickets to sports sessions are designated as “General Admission” tickets. Shown below is the official description of what “Reserved” and “General Admission” means:

What does reserved seating mean?

Reserved seating means a specific seat number is assigned to every ticket.

What does general admission mean?

General admission means there is no specific seat assigned to a ticket. However, the zone as per price category will be pre-assigned.

We realise that this may cause you some inconvenience, Sportsworld did protest to D2010 that this was not the best way to manage ticketing at a major sporting event, unfortunately, we were not able to make them alter how they will manage the seating configuration within the venues.

When planning your travel to sessions designated as “General Admission” events, we suggest you allow additional time to arrive at the venues early so that you can select which seats you wish to sit in. Should you require further clarification or have any other query relating to you booking, please don’t hesitate to contact us at XXXXX@sportsworld.co.uk

Kind regards

Sportsworld Delhi 2010 Team

Seriously. Half finished stadiums. No reserved seating. This is gonna be the biggest joke of a sporting event in the history of existence.

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Seriously. Half finished stadiums. No reserved seating. This is gonna be the biggest joke of a sporting event in the history of existence.

Which is really odd considering Delhi has previously hosted the Asians 2x and India is supposedly a high-tech center??

Well CWG 2010 will certainly be known as one thing: How NOT to Stage an International Sports Event!

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They look like pretty dull uninspired designs to me.

Yeah, I thought much the same. Pretty bog standard compared to most recent Olympic medals at least. Do the Commonwealth Medals have to fit some standard template a la summer Olympic ones?

Not actually. :)

The Commonwealth Games 2010 medals are inspired by a vessel called 'surahi', it was used during the Mughal age, for storing water and like.

Here's an example:

5.jpg

You can see the similarity:

cwgmedal.jpg

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Hmmmm. This far out from Athens everyone was still holding their breath too. The whole corruption thing I think's always gonna leave a taint, and I don't think anyone's gonna relax until they hand over to the men in Kilts at the closing, but, hey, I don't think the expectation bar is high at the moment. They could surprise.

What gets me is how Kalmadi is still in his role?

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I know Athens was one hellava rush, but did we ever read stories about faked construction certificates and substandard building work? I'm not sure that comparison is quite fair on the Greeks who built some of the most remarkable Olympic structures ever.

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Not actually. :)

The Commonwealth Games 2010 medals are inspired by a vessel called 'surahi', it was used during the Mughal age, for storing water and like.

Here's an example:

5.jpg

You can see the similarity:

cwgmedal.jpg

I don't see the resemblance at all. Dehli 2010, fail.

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There ineptitude astounds me. Pigheaded lot they are.

It should be 'their', and not 'there'. :rolleyes:

And at the expense of only 42 lives...what a triumph!

That is some crazy clockwork, this is what I meant. And I feel sad for the workers, who lost their lives during construction work, and for their families as well. Everyone is aware of this fact. You can keep your sarcasm with yourself. :)

I just remember that many workers died building the Athens venues, and in any rush there are sure to be things that were not quite kosher.

Second that. I agree to the fact that Labour laws in India are not that much rigid, but oversupply of anything, surely leads to some accidents.

I don't see the resemblance at all. Delhi 2010, fail.

Some people have a different perspective for different things. And some just believe in closing their eyes to everything.

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Jawahar Lal Nehru Stadium - Athletics, Lawn Bowls, Weightlifting

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Weightlifting stadium (inside the JLN Stadium Complex)

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Dhyan Chand National Stadium – Hockey

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Indira Gandhi Arena – Cycling, Gymnastics, Wrestling

Gymnastics

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Wrestling Hall

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Cycling Velodrome

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Delhi University sports complex – Rugby sevens

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Thyagaraj Stadium – Netball

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Siri Fort Sports Complex – Badminton, Squash

Badminton Arena

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Dr. Karni Singh Shooting Range – Shooting

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Talkatora Stadium – Boxing

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SPM Swimming Pool Complex – Aquatics

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RK Khanna Tennis Complex – Tennis

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Yamuna Sports Complex – Table tennis - March 2010

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It should be 'their', and not 'there'. :rolleyes:

That is some crazy clockwork, this is what I meant. And I feel sad for the workers, who lost their lives during construction work, and for their families as well. Everyone is aware of this fact. You can keep your sarcasm with yourself. :)

Second that. I agree to the fact that Labour laws in India are not that much rigid, but oversupply of anything, surely leads to some accidents.

Some people have a different perspective for different things. And some just believe in closing their eyes to everything.

You sir are living in a fool's paradise! NO workers should die during the preparation for any games. NONE!!! And it is not sarcasm to point out that there is a seething underclass of people in your country that are being exploited to get these farcical games ready when they are way beyond budget and planned delivery time for a pittance and who are killed in preparation of an event that will only benefit the corrupt and the wealthy. Considering that at best estimates there were upwards of 10 deaths before Beijing's Olympics, 5 before Athens' and 1 each before Sydney 2000 and Atlanta the death toll for these unwarranted games at 42 is a national shame which should lead to the resignation of all officials involved as well as prosecution of the contractors who are exposing your fellow citizens to third world safety practices. I would rather have the perspective that the loss of one life is something to be avoided, lamented and maybe even result in criminal charges than take your approach which is to blithely equate the oversupply of poor people who are in desperate need of a basic income (which is not being given to them) to fatal accidents. Instead of trumpeting the design of the medals how about exerting the same energy in asking your civic and commercial leaders about why Delhi 2010 has been blackened by the shame of corruption and avoidable deaths. What a waste for such a redundant event....

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Scandalous...simply scandalous :angry:

NEW DELHI: Jayanti is traumatised by the thought of the speeding truck that crushed to death her two-year-old daughter, Varsha, on Monday night inside the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium complex. The world has collapsed for her and her husband, Hari, but it’s work as usual at the complex. The fear of the contractors enforcing a strict deadline was palpable on Wednesday. Hundreds of labourers worked at a frantic pace while security guards maintained a hawkish vigil at the many gates.

Jayanti, 22, and her husband came to Delhi just over a month back from their village close to Jhansi to join the thousands working at Commonwealth Games construction sites. And their world has turned upside down.

When this reporter visited the stadium complex on Wednesday, all the gates were well-guarded with securitymen keeping the workers away from any questioning. Outside the gates, one saw labourers, both men and women, doing streetscaping work. Most were afraid to talk and few were aware of the death of a child inside the complex. With parents at work, children were seen playing in the midst of construction material and equipment on the road.

Jayanti said they had been employed for about 15 days at this site and were getting Rs 130 each as daily wages. The work hours stretch from 8.00 am to 8.00 pm. Weeping for her daughter, Jayanti said on Monday evening, she had asked the in-charge if she could leave for the day with her daughter at 7.00 pm but she wasn’t allowed to go.

When the truck appeared from nowhere and crashed into the footpath, the workers ran to safety but Varsha came under the wheels and died on the spot. The driver managed to escape in the chaos though the gate is well-guarded. The police was called and a case registered. Officials at the Lodi Road Police Station said the driver had been traced and was being brought to Delhi from Himachal Pradesh.

Hari said in the past two days they have received no help from the authorities, not even a few words of consolation. Geeta, another construction worker, who also belongs to Jhansi, complained that she has been working at the site for over a month now and there are no facilities for children. ‘‘They make us work all day, and with no place to leave the children behind, we have to take them to the site where they just play around,’’ she said, pointing out her four children. There are many more inside the complex.

Anjali Alexander from the Commonwealth Games-Citizens Workers Women and Children’s network says a creche is critical at such sites till work is on as children cannot be left in unsafe zones. ‘‘We had set up a creche with the assistance of the state labour department at a few sites, including JLN stadium. This creche started in 2008 July and continued with labour board funding till August 2009. After that we ran the creche till April 2010 with other resources, but then we asked by the authorities to leave as the work was going to get over. We kept pointing out that there were children there but no one listened to us,’’ said Anjali.

Read more: Kids at Games sites face danger & death - Delhi - City - The Times of India

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