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New Olympic Sports?


Sir Rols

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Well, London 2012 seems to be the best offing for cricket and the rugbys. But is that the year the host is allowed 2 indigenous sports, begins?

Problem w/ cricket is that (1) it may require another whole new venue?

(2) Besides, it must be played in at least 35 nations spread out over at least 3 or 4 continents.

(3) Of the top 5 major, populous Summer Games sporting nations (the US, Russia, Germany, China, and Oz), it really has a following only in OZ. Other than the major CW nations (India, Pakistan, the UK, So. Africa, etc.), it does not have a major following in South & Central Americas, and the rest of Europe, Asia, Africa. If India and the UK were to breakthrough into the top 8 nations above, the cricket's chances would be greatly improved.

(4) And it cannot go on indefinitely (i.e., for days). If you've noticed, ALL Olympic sports conclude within a specified few hours' time.

1) So would most potential new sports.

2)The ICC has 101 member country.

3) :rolleyes:

4)Thats why Twenty20 Cricket exist: takes about three hours to complete a game.

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(1) So would most potential new sports.

That's why if a new sport can piggyback onto an existing venue, that improves its chances.

And remember too, a new sport requiring a NEW venue (OK, if there's an existing one that can be upgraded to Olympic standards) + large teams would exponentially ADD greater costs to the overall budget. As if London isn't already suffering from strained, over-budget woes as you must be aware.

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I am not saying that Cricket should be added at the SOG, just that I believe that it is feasible. As for the London budget skyrocketing, I believe it just show that the OG should use more existing venues *staring at Sochi whit disbelieve they actualy won...*.

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(4) And it cannot go on indefinitely (i.e., for days). If you've noticed, ALL Olympic sports conclude within a specified few hours' time.

The 20-20 version of cricket can be played out in little more than 3-4hours...so, with a similar format to Olympic soccer (maybe with less teams though) the sport could be made viable over a 12 or so day competition.

Problem w/ cricket is that (1) it may require another whole new venue?

Well really any field big enough with temporary seating would be suitable. Only problem being is creating a pitch...Easily overcome in major cricketing nations but could be difficult if Chicago was the host.

Then again if we can manage to build swimming pools, athletics tracks and weightlifting floors im sure someone in less experienced nations could knock up a pitch in the 6year period. Is a grassed field with 5-10,000 temporary seats really too much to ask?

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Then again if we can manage to build swimming pools, athletics tracks and weightlifting floors im sure someone in less experienced nations could knock up a pitch in the 6year period. Is a grassed field with 5-10,000 temporary seats really too much to ask?

I don't know. I am not from a cricketing nation. I just sort of understand the fundamentals. I don't know what it would take to put it in an Olympic setting -- that is why I ask.

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I think weightlifting should go.

Funnily enough, weightlifting's one of those strange Olympic sports that I have absolutely no interest in, would never watch a tournament at any other time, but comes Games time when it shows up on TV, It end up being glued to it. I can be quite dramatic and tense.

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Funnily enough, weightlifting's one of those strange Olympic sports that I have absolutely no interest in, would never watch a tournament at any other time, but comes Games time when it shows up on TV, I end up being glued to it. I can be quite dramatic and tense.

Yeah me too, I'm not to fond of this. I'm not really interested either.

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I think weightlifting should go.

The thing about weightlifting though is that it doesn't require an arena. Get an auditorium that can seat 2500 and a VERY STRONG stage, and you're all set. That's why this ridiculous sport is gonna stay in there for awhile -- not to mention it's theone sport where Turkey and Bulgaria and that whole Asia minor arc of -stan countries can hope to medal.

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I don't know. I am not from a cricketing nation. I just sort of understand the fundamentals. I don't know what it would take to put it in an Olympic setting -- that is why I ask.

An oval or rounded square grass field with ropped boundaries and a compacted grass/clay/dirt "pitch" 20m long and 3m wide in the middle. Most baseball stadiums would have the dimensions to play 20-20 cricket (shorter boundaries). Not to sure about ODI's.

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This cricket ground has 18,000seats. A venue in a non cricketing nation would ony need 5-6,000 i would think.

I discovered a new sport theother day. Fistball, aparently its fairly popular in Europe. Could anyone give me the low down on this?

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Here's one the Baron may be pleased by:

Ballroom, a.k.a. DanceSport

Could competitive dancing be next Olympic sport?

December 26, 2007

BY SUZETTE LABOY

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Evgeny Dyachenko and Inna Ivanenko spend hours in the gym lifting weights. Five, six days a week they practice at the ballet barre to keep their legs and backs strong, squeezing in yoga or Pilates classes to help with their stretching.

Their schedule may sound like the strict regimen of a tennis champion or even an NFL player, but Dyachenko, 25, and Ivanenko, 34, a married couple originally from Russia, are training for what could be the next big Olympic sport: ballroom dancing.

"People think that you can learn how to be like beautiful in one week, which is not realistic," says Ivanenko, who rehearses routines for at least six hours a day. "It takes years and years and years."

The timing has never been better for ballroom dancing, which has only recently caught Americans' fancy.

"Dancing with the Stars" was ranked in the top 5 shows of 2007 for both its two weekly broadcasts, according to Nielsen Media Research ratings. Even the show's accomplished athletes visibly struggle with the difficult routines, and it's no easier for competitive dancers.

"If you look at the young people today competing, right now they can't drink. They can't smoke," says Didio Barrera, the features editor for Dance Beat, a magazine for ballroom dancing. "They cannot go to bed late or you will have a bad performance. It's to that level where you cannot afford to have a rough night or just go to the club."

But is it a sport?

The World Sports Federation thinks so. So does the International Olympic Committee. In fact, it was because of the IOC that ballroom dancing is now known as DanceSport.

"Anybody who has done it knows it's a sport because it's hard," says James Fraser, International DanceSport Federation Presidium member. The point of the name change, he says, was "to direct the whole consciousness of what we're doing to a sport, rather than an art."

There's no doubt it can be physically taxing. The muscle exertion and breathing rates of competitors in a 2-minute ballroom dance were equal to those of cyclists, swimmers and an Olympic 800 meter runner over the same period of time, according to a 1986 study at the University of Freiburg, Germany.

In 2002, DanceSport submitted a request to be considered for admission to the Olympics. The IOC considers several factors in adding a sport, including the sport's history and tradition, popularity and cost. DanceSport will not be included in the 2012 Olympic Games, but could be added in 2016.

In its report last summer on future Olympic Games, the IOC asked DanceSport to increase its spectatorship and television viewership, both of which the dancing community has been doing steadily.

"Without television you are just not going to be successful in the Olympic games, but we are just about the most viewed sport on TV right now," Fraser says.

Another point in their favor is gender parity. DanceSport is one of a few sports in which men and women compete against each other in the same playing field, which is a big deal for the IOC, says Peter Pover, President of USA Dance.

All in all, the dancing community is optimistic.

As Barrera puts it: "We are competing against each other. So it's not like we do it just as an exhibition. We actually can compare whether your cha-cha is better than my cha-cha."

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THanks for that Sir Rol.

Yeah, I think Ballroom Dancing would have a very good chance in the Summer slate, especially because there already is a recognized and successful counterpart in the Winter Games -- Ice Dancing. And I think the 4 leading cities for 2016 (Chicago, Madrid, Rio and Tokyo) are all very receptive to this new sport; it would be a hot ticket, especially in Chicago 2016. It's really a sport made for TV.

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I discovered a new sport theother day. Fistball, aparently its fairly popular in Europe. Could anyone give me the low down on this?

I don't know much about fistball. Can you tell me how it's played?

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Here's one the Baron may be pleased by:

Can you have ballroom dancing in arts and cultural section?

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Why should it go there? It's a legitimate sport.

I am saddened to say it, but I agree whit Baron. Dancing is no less of a sport that all those other judged sports (from Gymnastics to Boxing).

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I discovered a new sport theother day. Fistball, aparently its fairly popular in Europe. Could anyone give me the low down on this?

I don't know much about fistball. Can you tell me how it's played?

Basically, it´s played on a grass field, separeted in two halfs by a net (just like the volleyball net) 2m over the ground. Each team has 5 players and they must hit the ball with their fists in order to prevent the other team to return it. Each team may hit the ball the maximum of three times - only a single bounce is permitted between one hit and another - before returning it to the opposite team´s side. It´s played - normally - in a best-of-3 sets game, and each set ends in 21 points.

The best teams today are Austria (current world champions), Switzerland, Brazil (two-time world champions), Germany, Argentina and Denmark

Fistball is a very, very old sport but its not much popular worldwide. check this out: http://www.ifa-fistball.com/

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I hope they also come to include something preaching about religion.

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Didn't work for cricket for the Commonwealth Games _ that's been the big factor why it hasn't made it again since KL 1998 _ none of the big test nations will commit to their top teams.

Rugby 7s is a different kettle of fish. It has way of a head start over Cricket getting Olympic admission. The 7s circuit is established and prestigious in its own right. In many ways, it's not so much a stripped down version of the main game as a code of its own.

But the cricket tournament at the 1998 Commonwealths was a full 50 overs a side affair. This will almost certainly only be a Twenty20. The major problem cricket has to tackle is the seemingly never-ending demands of the international calendar. That to me is the major stumbling block to getting into the Olympics.

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But the cricket tournament at the 1998 Commonwealths was a full 50 overs a side affair. This will almost certainly only be a Twenty20. The major problem cricket has to tackle is the seemingly never-ending demands of the international calendar. That to me is the major stumbling block to getting into the Olympics.

That was the problem with Delhi, wasn't it? India wanted it in (understandably) But the ICC couldn't guarantee that the best national sides would attend.

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