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New Olympic Sports?


Sir Rols

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Water Skiing is a recongized sport by the IOC, therefore it qualifies for entiry into the games.

From Olympic Charter

<<<<<

Art. 47 - Sports Programme, Admission of Sports, Disciplines and Events

page 90

………

4 Criteria for Admission of Sports, Disciplines and Events:

4.1 To be included in the programme of the Olympic Games any sport, discipline or event must satisfy the conditions specified by this rule.

4.2 Sports, disciplines or events in which performance depends essentially on mechanical propulsion are not acceptable.

………..

>>>>>

In the case of rowing, cycling, windsurf the performance does NOT depend essentially….

Different is the case of water skiing, motorcycle, kart ………

Other activities as chess, bridge (though they are in the list of recognized sport federations) are defined by the IOC Programme Commission as MIND SPORT, and cannot be acceptable in the OG.

;) Beside, I like water skiing and I’d like to practise it, but I swim like an iron :D:D

Bst rgds

Logic

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  • 2 months later...
Olympic Cricket Out, Squash In

Posted 11:43 am ET (GamesBids.com)

Cricket is reportedly not likely to be an Olympic sport in the foreseeable future while a decision on squash may be made in 2009, said Jacques Rogge, President of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Tuesday.

Rogge said, “International Cricket Council itself has not applied for Olympic membership and the game is unlikely to get entry into the IOC community though I myself am fond of cricket”.

But Rogge said he would like to include squash at the 2016 Games. He said “the host city of 2016 Olympics would be decided in 2009 and at that time the sports to be played in 2016 Olympics will also be decided”.

Hmmm, I'm amazed that cricket was even considered. It might be played in some form or basis in the required number of countries, but seriously, there's only 10 Test nations, and even some of them are arguable inclusions. Interesting that Rogge's a fan. What with that and his Rugby experience he seems quite the anglophile (wonder what Cordelia would make of that).

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Hmmm, I'm amazed that cricket was even considered. It might be played in some form or basis in the required number of countries, but seriously, there's only 10 Test nations, and even some of them are arguable inclusions. Interesting that Rogge's a fan. What with that and his Rugby experience he seems quite the anglophile (wonder what Cordelia would make of that).

I'm more amazed that cricket isn't in the World Games either. The IRB, with the sport of rugby 7s, is in it, but not cricket for some unknown reasons. Roltel, maybe you can answer this question. Why isn't cricket recognized by the IOC? I just looked at the IOC website and the ICC isn't in their recognized federations page.

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I'm more amazed that cricket isn't in the World Games either. The IRB, with the sport of rugby 7s, is in it, but not cricket for some unknown reasons. Roltel, maybe you can answer this question. Why isn't cricket recognized by the IOC? I just looked at the IOC website and the ICC isn't in their recognized federations page.

My guess would probably be that it doesn't have enough recognised national federations to qualify. As I said, really it only has 10 nations that are recognised for test status (and three of those _ Bangladesh, Zimbabwe and Kenya trail the rest by a loooong way).. That is just a guess, though, and it is recognised at Commonwealth Games level, even if it has only been contested at the CWGs once, in Kuala Lumpur.

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Id like to see golf or Formula one make an olympic debut in the future

Golf was last played in the Olympic Games in St. Louis 1904. As for motorsports, motorcycle racing is recognized by the IOC and could end up in the Olympic program someday.

My guess would probably be that it doesn't have enough recognised national federations to qualify. As I said, really it only has 10 nations that are recognised for test status (and three of those _ Bangladesh, Zimbabwe and Kenya trail the rest by a loooong way).. That is just a guess, though, and it is recognised at Commonwealth Games level, even if it has only been contested at the CWGs once, in Kuala Lumpur.

Now, that is very funny indeed. Again, I just looked at the same IOC web page and I found that the sport of bandy, with only 11 certified nations in the world that actually play it, was recognized by the IOC in Athens 2004. Yes, its international federation is in the same category as golf. As of we speak, there is talk about adding it to the Olympic program starting in Vancouver 2010. From what I can see, bandy seems to be like ice hockey, but I need much more info to get a clearer picture about it.

So, with that kind of scenario, one would think that cricket and the ICC should be, at least, be eligible to be in the IOC-recognized category.

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  • 3 months later...

Squash and Rugby-7s should definately be added to the Olympic programme - both are fast and exciting spectator sports - which wouldn't involve massive building projects that would add to the cost of the Games - Rugby can use a football stadium and squash can be one of those events that is added to an iconic location within the host city as beach volleyball tends to be.

I don't think dancing or bodybuilding should be added - they're both more entertainment than sport, in my opinion, at least with gymnastics and ice skating there's a particular skill being displayed and they're not completely subjective. Golf and cricket are too slow and don't transfer so well for viewers on television.

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Don't tell ESPN or sports writers here that golf is too slow and boring, because while they ridicule hockey or anything overwhemingly popular outside the U.S., they get into fistfights and barroom brawls....over golf. It's pathetic.

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Golf was last played in the Olympic Games in St. Louis 1904. As for motorsports, motorcycle racing is recognized by the IOC and could end up in the Olympic program someday.

Now, that is very funny indeed. Again, I just looked at the same IOC web page and I found that the sport of bandy, with only 11 certified nations in the world that actually play it, was recognized by the IOC in Athens 2004. Yes, its international federation is in the same category as golf. As of we speak, there is talk about adding it to the Olympic program starting in Vancouver 2010. From what I can see, bandy seems to be like ice hockey, but I need much more info to get a clearer picture about it.

So, with that kind of scenario, one would think that cricket and the ICC should be, at least, be eligible to be in the IOC-recognized category.

The major reason the IOC accepts and 'recognizes' these weird federations is since the IOC is the only show in town for the time being, better sign them up before they band together and stage an alternative to the Olympics! That was the big mistake of the Goodwill Games. It copied the same sports as the IOC and combined the winter and summer sports.

Once the borderline sports are allied with the IOC, the easier it is to keep them in line -- and keep them dangling as 'possible inclusion' before they run off and consolidate with others. In which case, the IOC would then declare them as 'renegayde' and 'not bonafide' sports. Devious ways and thinking are NOT outside the IOC's realm.

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From what I can see, bandy seems to be like ice hockey, but I need much more info to get a clearer picture about it.

It is essentially ice-hockey played with a ball on a large field.

To me it is a more fun version to see than the the Canadian puck game that became the de facto international standard.

It is quite popular in the 11 countries, but the World titles usually go either Russia or Sweden.

The good thing about it is that bandy does not require additional infrastructure for the Olympics - it can fit together with speedskating in the oval.

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The good thing about it is that bandy does not require additional infrastructure for the Olympics - it can fit together with speedskating in the oval.

Yeah, but the inside of the speedskating oval in an Olympics is used as a 'staging' area. I don't even think it's on ice -- is it?

Has anybody tried to fit a wood cycling track onto an indoor speedskating facility? Would these 2 sports -- and as Vamos says, "bandy" can fit it -- be compatible for 1 venue and therefore have nearly year-round use?

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Yeah, but the inside of the speedskating oval in an Olympics is used as a 'staging' area. I don't even think it's on ice -- is it?

Has anybody tried to fit a wood cycling track onto an indoor speedskating facility? Would these 2 sports -- and as Vamos says, "bandy" can fit it -- be compatible for 1 venue and therefore have nearly year-round use?

Velodromes are usually between 250 and 333 meters and have banked turns...It just wouldn't work out.

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Velodromes are usually between 250 and 333 meters and have banked turns...It just wouldn't work out.

Since they are both ovals, couldn't it be designed so that the smaller, banked cycling track (and it's usually made of good wood) will sit over the 400m speeddskating track when in use; and then just folded (or slid) away when the flat ice track is to be used?

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Since they are both ovals, couldn't it be designed so that the smaller, banked cycling track (and it's usually made of good wood) will sit over the 400m speeddskating track when in use; and then just folded (or slid) away when the flat ice track is to be used?

That could work, but you would have to completely rearrange the seating for each event as seats would be below the track for cycling events...It would be done, though.

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  • 4 weeks later...

And now Surfing is pushing for Olympic admission:

BRISBANE, Australia, April 27, 2007 (AFP) - The head of the Association of Surfing Professionals Friday said it was time the sport made its Olympic debut to reflect youth culture in the new millennium.

Wayne Bartholomew, a former world champion who pushed for surfing's inclusion at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, said some of the sports on the Olympic program were no longer relevant.

``I led the bid for surfing's inclusion at the 2000 Olympics. I learned a lot of lessons in that, it does get very political,'' he told reporters here.

``But it is time for the Olympic body to have a look at what youth are doing today in the new millennium, what sports are really relevant.

``Are sports from 60 years ago truly relevant in the world today?

``And the thing is (surfing) easily follows the criteria. There's over 100 nations that surf, it is truly a global sport.''

The Olympics currently has 28 events.

Why not? I've got nothing against it. (And something Australia should do well in, hehe).

Of course, though, it's the question now what would it replace?

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How will you charge admission? It would favor coastal cities. I think it's too risky. After a shark bite or 2, they'll change their minds.

I say Bowling and Ballroom Dancing have a better chance of getting in that Surfing only because those are codified sports and competition is held in controlled environments. Surfing is just too flakey.

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And now Surfing is pushing for Olympic admission:

Why not? I've got nothing against it. (And something Australia should do well in, hehe).

Even more difficult than assuring good and constant winds for sailing events is to have a decent coastal venue with the required waves :unsure:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Some of these sports that have Olympic ambitions are just ridiculour. Would you believe Rock, paper, Scissors?!?

:blink:

WASHINGTON - Rock crushes scissors, scissors cut paper and paper covers

rock. But nothing beats an all-expenses-paid for trip to Las Vegas and a

shot at winning dollars 50,000.

What was once a game to settle playground disputes has has grown up to be

on the cusp of recognition as a global sport, with this year's finals of

the USA Rock Paper Scissors Tournament bringing together more than 300

contestants from all over America.

Matti Leshem, the national league's self-styled commissioner, has already

petitioned the International Olympic Committee to make it an event. Now he

wants to bring "the greatest competition ever to sweep the USA" to

Britain.

"I'm in talks with broadcasters in your country. I've a sneaking feeling

that you guys will be good at it," he said yesterday (Monday). "Some of

your young people are quite athletic."

Nor does his ambition for RPS, as he calls it, stop there.

"This is a sport which creates harmony - we should get out of Iraq and

start throwing RPS instead. I want to set up the RPS Foundation which

promotes this sport as a simple method of conflict resolution."

Sunday night's final was the culmination of more than 300 regional heats

involving, said Mr Lesham, "hundreds of thousands of people" all of whom

beat their fists twice in the air (three times in Britain) before

revealing one of the symbols.

The dollars 50,000 prize went to Jaime Langridge, a male nurse from

Odessa, Texas. The pre-tournament favourite, Antonie "Shears" Maanum, was

surprisingly eliminated despite trying to put off opponents by wearing a

red silk boxing gown.

Paramedics were on hand in case of "wrist or shoulder dislocations" while

each bout took place under the careful gaze of trained referees. Fouls

include the vertical paper throw, known as "the handshake", deemed illegal

because it resembles scissors - as well as the horizontal scissors throw,

outlawed for the opposite reason.

More legitimate techniques include "cloaking" - concealing your choice

until the last possible second - or "shadowing", where players pretend to

choose one symbol and then change at the last second. Some players use

special fingerless RPS gloves.

"A lot of people tried to cheat. They throw early and then roll their

hands," said Mr Leshem, a 44-year-old Hollywood producer who clearly

understands the value of hype. "We had the world's greatest RPS referee in

Phil Gordon [a well-known poker player] and he made some big calls. There

was a lot of controversy, but we went back on the videotape and he got it

right every time."

The USARPS league is burgeoning largely because of its sponsorship from

Bud Light, which sees it as the perfect bar-side competition. The brewing

firm flew all 300 competitors and their guests to Vegas, as well as paying

for a lavish party and the prize money.

But there is evidence that RPS is beginning to creep into other parts of

American life. Last year a federal judge in Florida settled a hugely

technical legal case by ordering the two sides to play RPS.

And when Takashi Hashiyama, a Japanese executive, could not decide where

to auction his firm's collection of Impressionist paintings, he told the

US divisions of Christie's and Sotheby's to match off in similar fashion,

saying: "This is the best way to decide between two things which are

equally good."

Mr Leshem is scathing however, about a rival organisation - the long

established World Rock Paper Scissors Society.

"They try to claim the sport was invented in Britain! RPS has been around

for centuries. They even played in Stone Age times - but then it was known

as Rock, Rock, Rock."

THE TIMES

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Some of these sports that have Olympic ambitions are just ridiculous. Would you believe Rock, paper, Scissors?!?

:blink:

WASHINGTON - Rock crushes scissors, scissors cut paper and paper covers

rock. But nothing beats an all-expenses-paid for trip to Las Vegas and a

shot at winning dollars 50,000.

What was once a game to settle playground disputes has has grown up to be

on the cusp of recognition as a global sport, with this year's finals of

the USA Rock Paper Scissors Tournament bringing together more than 300

contestants from all over America.

Matti Leshem, the national league's self-styled commissioner, has already

petitioned the International Olympic Committee to make it an event. Now he

wants to bring "the greatest competition ever to sweep the USA" to

Britain.

"I'm in talks with broadcasters in your country. I've a sneaking feeling

that you guys will be good at it," he said yesterday (Monday). "Some of

your young people are quite athletic."

Nor does his ambition for RPS, as he calls it, stop there.

"This is a sport which creates harmony - we should get out of Iraq and

start throwing RPS instead. I want to set up the RPS Foundation which

promotes this sport as a simple method of conflict resolution."

Sunday night's final was the culmination of more than 300 regional heats

involving, said Mr Lesham, "hundreds of thousands of people" all of whom

beat their fists twice in the air (three times in Britain) before

revealing one of the symbols.

The dollars 50,000 prize went to Jaime Langridge, a male nurse from

Odessa, Texas. The pre-tournament favourite, Antonie "Shears" Maanum, was

surprisingly eliminated despite trying to put off opponents by wearing a

red silk boxing gown.

Paramedics were on hand in case of "wrist or shoulder dislocations" while

each bout took place under the careful gaze of trained referees. Fouls

include the vertical paper throw, known as "the handshake", deemed illegal

because it resembles scissors - as well as the horizontal scissors throw,

outlawed for the opposite reason.

More legitimate techniques include "cloaking" - concealing your choice

until the last possible second - or "shadowing", where players pretend to

choose one symbol and then change at the last second. Some players use

special fingerless RPS gloves.

"A lot of people tried to cheat. They throw early and then roll their

hands," said Mr Leshem, a 44-year-old Hollywood producer who clearly

understands the value of hype. "We had the world's greatest RPS referee in

Phil Gordon [a well-known poker player] and he made some big calls. There

was a lot of controversy, but we went back on the videotape and he got it

right every time."

The USARPS league is burgeoning largely because of its sponsorship from

Bud Light, which sees it as the perfect bar-side competition. The brewing

firm flew all 300 competitors and their guests to Vegas, as well as paying

for a lavish party and the prize money.

But there is evidence that RPS is beginning to creep into other parts of

American life. Last year a federal judge in Florida settled a hugely

technical legal case by ordering the two sides to play RPS.

And when Takashi Hashiyama, a Japanese executive, could not decide where

to auction his firm's collection of Impressionist paintings, he told the

US divisions of Christie's and Sotheby's to match off in similar fashion,

saying: "This is the best way to decide between two things which are

equally good."

Mr Leshem is scathing however, about a rival organisation - the long

established World Rock Paper Scissors Society.

"They try to claim the sport was invented in Britain! RPS has been around

for centuries. They even played in Stone Age times - but then it was known

as Rock, Rock, Rock."

THE TIMES

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  • 1 month later...

One of the subjects that will be discussed at the 119th IOC Session is the evaluation of the WINTER SPORTS AND EVENTS that are currently in the Olympic Winter Games. Remember, they gave their thumbs-up for the event of SKI CROSS to be performed at Vancouver 2010.

Link: IOC: 2014 Olympic Sports Programme On IOC Session's Agenda

By the way, if any of you Olympic fans want, there is a 134-PAGE .pdf file for any of you to read. The link to it is within the link to the article above.

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