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New Olympic Sports?


Sir Rols

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Can somebody briefly explain the difference between the voting process this time and last time? Also will the IOC be voting out any sports this time?

The way I understand it is, the 26 sports for 2012 are set. Those 26 are also approved for 2016, but the Copenhagen session will also vote on including two more sports, out of seven bidders (rugby, baseball, softball, golf, karate, roller sports and squash), to bring it up to 28. They'll also approve 25 core sports for 2020, with the next big summer decision session after that voting on which optional extra sports to include for that Olympiad. And so on.

Also, the big difference is, to get voted in, a new sport need only get a majority vote (50 per cent plus). In the past, it was something like a two-thirds majority needed (someone correct me if that figure's wrong), which was a much harder poercenbtage for any sport to get together.

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What's really stupid is WHY don't they approve these sports BEFORE they have the 2016 candidate cities submit their near-final bids? It'll make maybe a $100- $125 million difference in both the cities' budgets and maybe in getting better venues for the 2 new sports...by maybe switching around a venue or 2 if the 2 new sports would fit better with an existing venue, then build or adapt a new one for the older sport moved out. It's JUST another half-assed backward attempt the way the IOC does things. But of course, who cares? They aren't paying for their vanities and last-minute shopping list.

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What's really stupid is WHY don't they approve these sports BEFORE they have the 2016 candidate cities submit their near-final bids? It'll make maybe a $100- $125 million difference in both the cities' budgets and maybe in getting better venues for the 2 new sports...by maybe switching around a venue or 2 if the 2 new sports would fit better with an existing venue, then build or adapt a new one for the older sport moved out. It's JUST another half-assed backward attempt the way the IOC does things. But of course, who cares? They aren't paying for their vanities and last-minute shopping list.

I agree with you to a point.

Also, to me it would make a big bearing on which sports are chosen as to who actually wins the hosting bid. If Chicago wins, for example, one would think baseball would be more appropriate to bring in. Ditto Tokyo and karate. Personally, I reckon it should be up to the host bidders to nominate the extra sports they'd prefer to have at their games (if they win).

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So 25 core sports for 2020? Will that mean 25 of the current 26 or 25 of the "new" 28. If its the "new 28" then surely the new 2 sports must be doubtful as being core sports. This means one of the current 26 will be dropped. Or if the new 2 sports get into the core 25 then 3 "old" sports being dropped.

I knew a bit about this a while ago. Equestrian, Modern Pentathlon and Rowing all seemed to be worried about their position. What are the current favourites for the "drop"? And is a "drop" likely?

Also what is the point of the 25 core sports? Will the dropped sports from the "new 28" have to re apply?

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So 25 core sports for 2020? Will that mean 25 of the current 26 or 25 of the "new" 28. If its the "new 28" then surely the new 2 sports must be doubtful as being core sports. This means one of the current 26 will be dropped. Or if the new 2 sports get into the core 25 then 3 "old" sports being dropped.

I knew a bit about this a while ago. Equestrian, Modern Pentathlon and Rowing all seemed to be worried about their position. What are the current favourites for the "drop"? And is a "drop" likely?

Also what is the point of the 25 core sports? Will the dropped sports from the "new 28" have to re apply?

Well, from my understanding, it's not quite as cast in iron and spoelled out as the Commonwealth Games process. I don't think it's actually spelled which sports are "core" and which are disposable. That said, the likes of athletics and aquatics, naturally, would be pretty safe. I think (but don't quote me on this), the droppable ones are at the discretion of the IUOC Executive Committee.

I'm all for flexibility in the sports roster - it's probably my main interest these days above anbd beyond the host city biddinbg contests. But it does seem it's a bit confusing at the moment.

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Hmmm. I don't know what it's based on, but this article has Rugby and Golf in the lead for inclusion in 2016:

Golf and rugby sevens favourites for 2016 Olympics

Golf and rugby sevens head a field of seven sports vying for inclusion in the Olympic programme that will address the International Olympic Committee's executive board in Lausanne on Monday.

Two of the seven will be added to the programme for the 2016 summer Games following a vote of the IOC membership in October, and Monday's presentations are a crucial stage in the lobbying campaign.

Baseball and softball, the two sports dropped from the Olympic schedule for the London games, are seeking readmission, with roller-sports, squash and karate completing the line-up of sports seeking approval that would transform their profile.

The IOC intends to whittle down the list from seven to two before the full vote in October, and as things stand golf and rugby sevens are favourites to make the cut.

Baseball and softball have their supporters and are the most likely challengers, but having been ejected from the programme after the Athens Games there may be a reluctance to readmit them so soon. Squash meanwhile will argue that it has most to gain from inclusion as well as being part of the racket sport tradition already well represented in the Games.

Commercial imperatives appear to be the over-riding factor in the race, with the IOC keen to remain an attractive broadcast product and provide existing and emerging markets with content that adds a premium to rights fees.

The International Rugby Board has run a sustained and persuasive campaign for sevens, stressing the commercial appeal of the abbreviated form of the game and its ability to attract travelling spectators.

It also scored highly when it announced that the Sevens World Cup would be ditched if it gained admission to the Olympics, a self-denying move that has gone down well in Lausanne.

Golf came later to the race but has established itself as a front-runner, thanks to its commercial popularity, ability to draw on a truly global field and the rise of the women's game. The endorsement of Tiger Woods has also boosted its chances.

Golf's presentation on Monday will be high-powered, with European Ryder Cup captain Colin Montgomerie and former womens' No 1 Anneka Sorenstam travelling to Lausanne with R&A chief executive Peter Dawson and US PGA commissioner Tim Finchem.

The games does face obstacles, including the fact that the four majors will remain the pinnacle of the game even if it does gain Olympic recognition.

Golf will promise on Monday that no majors would ever clash with the Olympicsand they will guarantee that the top 15 players in the world will play, regardless of nationality.

The IOC executive board is expected to decide its two selected sports at its August meeting before the vote in early October.

Daily Telegraph

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It has to be softball and rugby.

Actually, it looks to me like softball's got a bit of momentum building. It can't hurt that Prince Faisal seems to have got behind it as well.

You'd think the least ex-Rugby bplayer Rogge could do would be to throw his support behind 7s.

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IMO 7's rugby, including the recent world cup has shown that it would be a wonderful olympic sport, and that its players are from across the world, including many young players. The atmosphere at matches, the teams and the overall organization is a major positive.

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Should be Rugby 7's and Squash. Also, if this is possible under the confusing voting system, drop Modern Pentathlon.

In fantasy, add (in order of preference) Roller Sports (inline speedskating), Karate, Twenty20 Cricket and Golf with Taekwondo dropped and the maximum quota extended to 30 sports.

Still not a fan of Softball because of it's lack of competitiveness. It isn't healthy having a sport where the medals will be split almost certainly and exclusively by 5 countries (USA, Japan, China, Australia, Canada) and 1 country is virtually guarenteed to be in every gold medal match (USA). Some might argue that Cricket is similar, but the Twenty20 format has allowed the sport to become more competitive for the non-traditional cricket states. Cricket has 8 traditional powerhouse teams (more than Softball) and no obvious favourite (unlike Softball). Also appealing to the untapped market from an Olympic perspective; India.

Surely it's good business to include a sport which is popular in a region isolated from the Olympics with 1.5 billion residents (South Asia) than include yet another sport to appeal to the US?

How many "new" Olympic fans would Softball and Cricket actually bring to the Olympics? virtually none vs hundreds of millions

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I'm hopping for Rugby and Squash. Squash would probably be one of the most internationally diverse sport on the program, whit top competitors coming from both Olympic outposts like Malaysia and Egypt and traditional powerhouses like Great Britain and Australia, while Rugby would certainly be a winner in term of TV ratings. For Golf, my biggest concern would be the costs, especially if there is no existing Golf course around... And agree that Modern Pentathlon should probably be dropped.

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Softball has put forth an aggressive campaign to get back into the Olympics. Here's my question though. Is the game developed enough worldwide for it to be included over more established sports like rugby or golf? I would think with softball dominated by only a few nations that the IOC might not like having 15-0 and 20-0 contests in the prelims.

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Softball has put forth an aggressive campaign to get back into the Olympics. Here's my question though. Is the game developed enough worldwide for it to be included over more established sports like rugby or golf? I would think with softball dominated by only a few nations that the IOC might not like having 15-0 and 20-0 contests in the prelims.

Well, I could live with softball - at least it has that more "amateur" or "Olympic" feel to it compared to baseball.

I haven't looked at their proposals - is softball proposing both womens' and mens' competition for the games?

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Well, I could live with softball - at least it has that more "amateur" or "Olympic" feel to it compared to baseball.

I haven't looked at their proposals - is softball proposing both womens' and mens' competition for the games?

Yes, although you really have to dig to find out. Listening to the ISF you'd think men's Softball doesn't even exist: they keep talking about girls and womens...

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FYI:

Women push for Olympic sevens

June 17

THE growing popularity of women's rugby could be the catalyst for the sport's readmission to the Olympic Games.

Rugby sevens is one of seven sports that will be voted on by the IOC in Copenhagen in October for inclusion in the Olympic program from 2016 onwards.

The IOC prefers sports that cater for both men and women, which has hurt rugby's attempts to rejoin the Olympic family in the past.

But the IRB has worked hard to bridge the gender gap and women's rugby is now a major growth sport, taking significant steps over the past five years.

The IRB showed the importance of women's rugby when it included two women, including Australia's World Cup-winning captain Cheryl Soon, in a six-person delegation to lobby for rugby's return to the Olympics in Lausanne yesterday.

The other woman was leading Kazakhstan player Anastassiya Khamova, who joined IRB president Bernard Lapasset, IRB secretary general Mike Miller, Argentine legend Agustin Pichot and Kenyan sevens captain Humphrey Kayange.

"I think it's very important," Soon said of the importance of women's rugby to the Olympic bid. When the IRB took its case to the IOC in Singapore in a previous bid, one of the main reasons it was declined was that women were not involved in the sport. They weren't involved in the bid.

"The IRB have gone away and rectified the problem they previously had, not having women included in their campaign. It's very important," she said.

"Our success (at the World Cup in Dubai last March) demonstrated how important it is.

"They had two executive board members at the World Cup in Dubai and they were so impressed with the whole tournament, especially with the skill level of the women's game and how entertaining they were. It's vital, I think."

Soon played a leading role in delivering the IRB's "Rugby is right" pitch to the IOC.

"It was basically that rugby sevens is exciting, it's fast, it's entertaining, it has a huge fan base," she said.

"Playing at the Olympics, on the world stage, would provide another massive boost for rugby and for women's rugby."

The Australian

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What happened to ballroom dancing, is it a sport?

That's gonna start off a flurry of stroing opinions.

I say why not - if ice dancing is, why not dancesport? I'm sure it would rate well too.

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That's gonna start off a flurry of stroing opinions.

I say why not - if ice dancing is, why not dancesport? I'm sure it would rate well too.

Yeah, "Dancing with the Stars" and "So, can you dance?" are top-rated TV shows in the US. I'm sure there are similarly popular shows in other countries.

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