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New Olympic Sports?


Sir Rols

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Not necessary, but perhaps preferable, given the potential problems with the running track impeding the view of spectators. I mean, would you stage rugby at a London Olympics in the main stadium when you've got a venue like Twickenham ready and waiting?

It depends on if the city has a second stadium.

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Not necessary, but perhaps preferable, given the potential problems with the running track impeding the view of spectators. I mean, would you stage rugby at a London Olympics in the main stadium when you've got a venue like Twickenham ready and waiting?

for London would think Twickenham would be the best option. for any future bids most citys would have a football stadium that has more than 30000 seats would be able to be used.

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I'd have thought most serious candidate cities would be able to offer a separate venue, whether it is realistically needed or not.

Its stupid to build an entire new stadium for a 2 day tournament (4 with the women). Having it at the main stadium is technically more sound for most cities than having a separate venue. Take Berlin for instance, other than Olympiastadion they have no other stadiums that would meet the requirements for rugby. So why should Berlin have to build a separate stadium. It would also be stupid to have it in another city.

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Its stupid to build an entire new stadium for a 2 day tournament (4 with the women). Having it at the main stadium is technically more sound for most cities than having a separate venue. Take Berlin for instance, other than Olympiastadion they have no other stadiums that would meet the requirements for rugby. So why should Berlin have to build a separate stadium. It would also be stupid to have it in another city.

I am sure that it would be doable to fit this 2-day tournament during the first week of the Games (after the Opening Ceremony and before the athletics starts).

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Yea, for instance if Beijing had rugby the most logical thing would be to have the tournaments in the main stadium between the 9th and 12th, athletics starts on the 15th.

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Its stupid to build an entire new stadium for a 2 day tournament (4 with the women). Having it at the main stadium is technically more sound for most cities than having a separate venue. Take Berlin for instance, other than Olympiastadion they have no other stadiums that would meet the requirements for rugby. So why should Berlin have to build a separate stadium. It would also be stupid to have it in another city.

I'm not disagreeing with that view. What I'm saying is that if a suitable alternative venue exists, then it should be used.

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Yea, for instance if Beijing had rugby the most logical thing would be to have the tournaments in the main stadium between the 9th and 12th, athletics starts on the 15th.

It takes about 36 hours to prep a stadium for its T&F complement. And they need like 24 hours to prep it for Closing. I think Rugby can come in if they remove football.

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Well, remember they have put a cap on the total # of athletes at 10,500. How big are the rugby teams? Are there a women's component to Rugby?

The total number of athletes would be much less than the combined for softball and baseball, in fact 2 8 team tournaments would be less than baseball, rugby would have between 160 and 180, baseball has 260 to 280.

Baron there is enough days for the tournament to be in the main stadium if the athletics was compressed into 8 days. Logistically it is tight but possible.

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#1 - The total number of athletes would be much less than the combined for softball and baseball, in fact 2 8 team tournaments would be less than baseball, rugby would have between 160 and 180, baseball has 260 to 280.

#2 - Baron there is enough days for the tournament to be in the main stadium if the athletics was compressed into 8 days. Logistically it is tight but possible.

#1 - That's why I asked. I don't now rugby's nos. But is there a women's rugby tournament? They wouldn't let a male-only sport in.

#2 - Would NBC - IAAF allow a compressed 8 days of ahtletics?

#3 - Well, if rugby were in by 2016, and Rio would have a separate Ceremonies stadium, so no problem there. But I think Rio might throw in 'futsal' as one of its 'host-choice' sports.

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#1 - That's why I asked. I don't now rugby's nos. But is there a women's rugby tournament? They wouldn't let a male-only sport in.

#2 - Would NBC - IAAF allow a compressed 8 days of ahtletics?

#3 - Well, if rugby were in by 2016, and Rio would have a separate Ceremonies stadium, so no problem there. But I think Rio might throw in 'futsal' as one of its 'host-choice' sports.

futsal would actually not be a seperate sport, it would be included as a discipline of football

160 to 180 would include a women's and a men's tournament, hence ' 2 8 team tournaments', each team has 10 to 12 players, 16 x 12 is a lot less than 12 x 23

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futsal would actually not be a seperate sport, it would be included as a discipline of football

No; but futsal is played with what? only 4? or 6 players? In the sand, and a smaller field. I mean the way Beach Volleyball is to Indoor Volleyball. The mechanics are the same, but the physical requirements are vastly different. So it would still require a separate venue from the turf football stadia.

If anything, maybe the Beach Volleyball venue could dupe as a 'futsal' venue -- just make it a little bigger.

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No; but futsal is played with what? only 4? or 6 players? In the sand, and a smaller field. I mean the way Beach Volleyball is to Indoor Volleyball. The mechanics are the same, but the physical requirements are vastly different. So it would still require a separate venue from the turf football stadia.

If anything, maybe the Beach Volleyball venue could dupe as a 'futsal' venue -- just make it a little bigger.

No but as a discipline and not a sport it would be easier to get into the games.

But rugby 7's is the most likely sport, it would be gender neutral and add something else.

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No; but futsal is played with what? only 4? or 6 players? In the sand, and a smaller field. I mean the way Beach Volleyball is to Indoor Volleyball. The mechanics are the same, but the physical requirements are vastly different. So it would still require a separate venue from the turf football stadia.

If anything, maybe the Beach Volleyball venue could dupe as a 'futsal' venue -- just make it a little bigger.

BTW Baron, you are confusing Beach Soccer and Futsall (Futsall is indoor soccer).

Oh, and they're is currently world cup for women's Beach Soccer or for Futsall.

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BTW Baron, you are confusing Beach Soccer and Futsall (Futsall is indoor soccer).

Oh, and they're is currently world cup for women's Beach Soccer or for Futsall.

Oh, OK. I sit corrected. Beach Soccer has more of a chance making it than Rugby. How can Rugby be gender-neutral? What, everyone who plays willbe a tranny?

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Oh, OK. I sit corrected. Beach Soccer has more of a chance making it than Rugby. How can Rugby be gender-neutral? What, everyone who plays willbe a tranny?

Actually, there are mens and women's (even gay) Rugby competitions. And what's more, Rugby 7s is already included in the Commonwealth Games, Asian Games, Worldf games and Pan-Am Games. See the following:

Rugby in the Olympic Games

(IRB.COM) Tuesday 20 May 2008

In October 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark, the International Olympic Committee will vote on which city should host the 2016 Summer Games. The field is down to four candidate cities: Chicago (USA), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Madrid (Spain) and Tokyo (Japan).

The IOC will also vote on the composition of the sports programme for the 2016 Olympic Games as it seeks to modernise the Games. The IRB believes Rugby should be reintroduced to the Games following its last appearance in 1924 in Paris.

The Beijing Games in 2008 will comprise 28 sports. However, at the IOC session in Singapore in 2005 baseball and softball were voted out of the sports programme for London 2012 during a process the IOC had set up to start a modernisation of the sports programme. Unfortunately in Singapore the IOC chose not to include any new sports for London 2012 from a shortlist of Rugby, karate, squash, golf and roller sports.

The IOC has continued to review the sports programme for the Summer Games and is now committed to having 28 sports in the 2016 Olympic Games. Rugby is again on a shortlist of sports for inclusion that also includes baseball, softball, karate, squash, golf and roller sports.

Why Rugby and which form of the Game

The Olympic Games only lasts 16 days. Staging a credible Fifteens competition in that period is not feasible and therefore the IRB believes Rugby Sevens (men and women’s tournaments) would be the ideal form of the Game for Olympic inclusion in 2016.

After all it has a proven formula highlighted by its participation in the Commonwealth Games, Asian Games, World Games and from 2010 the Pan American Games. Talks are also underway to have it included in the African Games in the near future. Add to this the fact that we also have a Sevens Rugby World Cup heritage and the highly successful annual IRB Sevens World Series it is not hard to see why Sevens make sense.

A recent review of Rugby Sevens by the IRB has shown that participating Unions believe it is a valuable tool for developing talent, developing specific skill sets and a sport that has the potential to open up new markets around the world. Markets that will assist in the continued global spread of Rugby.

And that is what getting Rugby Sevens into the Olympic Games is all about and what is written down in the IRB Strategic Plan in terms of the organisation’s mission statement …” to create an environment in which Member Unions can flourish by developing and expanding the game globally.”

Rugby Sevens has experienced substantial growth in recent years that has mirrored the overall global growth of our great sport. It is a fast, action-packed sport that is played by boys, girls, men and women of all shapes, sizes, religion and creed.

The IRB Sevens World Series delivers a wonderful mix of speed, guile, world-class athletes and exotic international locations making it a well attended, colourful and a popular feature on the annual world sporting calendar. The IRB believes these outstanding attributes should see Sevens admitted to the Olympic Games in the future.

Rugby Sevens

The statistics speak for themselves.

Rugby Sevens’ brand of fast-paced action, world class players and global locations is attractive to sports fans worldwide. Last season’s IRB Sevens World Series attracted crowds in excess of 250,000, with Rugby World Cup Sevens 2005 in Hong Kong attracting 120,000 supporters over the three competition days. A record crowd of 50,000 attended the final session of the Rugby Sevens Tournament at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne and with 150,000 tickets sold over two days it was the second most watched sport at the games after athletics.

Sevens is the ideal vehicle for developing new rugby talent in emerging nations and its growing appeal is mirrored by record broadcast figures. The Rugby World Cup Sevens in Hong Kong enjoyed 160 hours of live broadcast coverage in 37 countries and an additional 40 hours of delayed broadcast coverage in a further 63 countries. There were 9.56 million hits on the Tournament-specific website. In March 2009 Dubai in the Middle East will host the next Sevens Rugby World Cup.

The 2006/07 IRB Sevens World Series was very competitive. It was televised by 30 international broadcasters in 11 different languages and reached 213 million homes (up 24 million on 2005/06) in 137 countries (up 1), and had a potential global cumulative reach of over 530 million (up 45 million). Live coverage increased dramatically during the season with 911 hours of action (up 72%)

Impressed? Well most people are when they look at the facts but unfortunately there is a lot of ignorance about the development importance of Sevens, its global spread and the fact that it is a sport in its own right. The present challenge for the IRB is to get this message across to the IOC strong and clear and it needs the full support of the entire Rugby community if it is to be successful in its ambition of seeing Rugby return to the Olympic Games.

The entire Rugby community has to be united in the drive to see Rugby, via Sevens, readmitted to the Olympic Games.

What would it mean to Rugby

Entry into the Olympic Games could prove to be the key to unlocking countries such as USA, Russia, China, and Germany where government funding of sport is largely dependent on Olympic Games participation. In all probability it would mean financial support, access to training facilities, academies, etc, and elevate the status of Rugby as a sport in these countries.

An Olympic Games Sevens tournament – one for men and one for women - would be the pinnacle of the sport of Sevens Rugby. The Fifteens game already has the Rugby World Cup. Rugby Sevens would give smaller developing Unions in regions such as Asia, Oceania and Africa an unprecedented chance to compete and win medals. The best example is the fact that Fiji is the reigning Rugby World Cup Sevens champion.

IRB.com

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rols - its Rugby Union in the Pan American games, not league.

Of course it is, I never said it was. League's a very minor game compared to Union. The Rugby League World Cup is a joke, and RL is NOT included in any multi-sport games. The piece above is from the IRB, the world Rugby Union board.

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Of course it is, I never said it was. League's a very minor game compared to Union. The Rugby League World Cup is a joke, and RL is NOT included in any multi-sport games. The piece above is from the IRB, the world Rugby Union board.

I take it you won't be watching the 'joke' Down Under later this year.

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I take it you won't be watching the 'joke' Down Under later this year.

Apart from games between Oz, UK and NZ, Nope! (and even then I reckon State of Origin matches are better spectacles).

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