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But those ceremonies were really nothing compared to what's been done after Moscow and LA.

Yeah but this was the best Parade of Athletes as well for the music (besides there is an interesting version of the olympic anthem). And is an important piece of history so dont complain :lol:

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Here's an edited clip of most of Albertville's Opening. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyipsdgnbbY&NR=1[\media] What does it all mean (other than "Oh Look, I can design great costumes!

Regardless. The images are those paid for by NBC. But here's the thing: what are the IOC and NBC going to do with those clips? I mean they are meant to be enjoyed by anybody who gets a kick from th

/\ Thanks for posting that, olympics08. Indeed an interesting find. It's just like Moscow'80 redux...only "happier, more joyous! Oh, look at the happy, content citizens of the Soviet Union (the e

Here are the clips again -- with hopefully working links:

Munich 1972 Opening Ceremony - Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

Part 6

Part 7

Part 8

Part 9

Part 10

Part 11

Part 12

Part 13

Part 14

Part 15

Part 16

Baron, even if the OC of Munich still sticked strongly to the old rather boring Olympic ceremonial tradition, it contained a very important innovation: The use of a special and creative musical accompaniment for the parade of nations. I believe that Munich had the first opening ceremony in which the athletes didn't have to parade to military marches. In that respect, also Munich paved the way for the glitz and glamour of today's Olympic ceremonies.

On a side note: The arrangement of the Olympic Anthem in part 12 (it was arranged by Alfred Goodman, a German-American composer living in Munich at that time) is the best one I've ever heard. So I'm especially glad that it's finally up on YouTube.

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OK, I've seen enough. That's why I've never wanted to re-visit this OC. It is so boring; so corny; so unimaginative. (ANd I imagine there are reasons that MOCOG wanted to keep it simple. But it totally escapes me. This was one of the last things I saw in Manila before I moved to the US.)

Just a few, random comments...

1. why are all the announcements only in Deutsche? So as a viewer, I DON'T relate at all to the proceedings.

2. It's ALL protocol-based. Deadly, deadly dull.

3. All those Bavarian folks dances on the track. So quaint, so kitsch, so lost.

4. Brundage was terrible to listen to, especially in German.

5. What's with the elaborate folding of the Olympic flag, only to hoist it up in a few minutes? Kinda dumb.

Thank God, they've seen to streamline the OCs now. Give me an overblown, over-produced $100 million ceremony any time.

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OK, I've seen enough. That's why I've never wanted to re-visit this OC. It is so boring; so corny; so unimaginative. (ANd I imagine there are reasons that MOCOG wanted to keep it simple. But it totally escapes me.

You have to watch it from a different perspective -- not from the perspective of someone oversaturated by the many glitzy and glamorous ceremonies since the 1980s, but from the perspective of the global audience and especially of the German hosts of the year 1972. This day and the whole Games were extremely important for Germany to prove that the country had changed enormously since the Third Reich. At the same time, the world was stunned how relaxed, unagitated and peaceful Germany presented itself at the opening ceremony, an impression which continued throughout the following days and weeks (at least until the terrorist attack of September 5). I think that it was simply a pleasant surprise in what a civil and joyous way Germany staged the opening ceremony. And the musical accompaniment of the parade of nations (provided by Kurt Edelhagen and his orchestra) was extremely innovative and thus much-acclaimed at that time, after years and decades of dull military marches. I think that if one watches the OC from that historical perspective, it's still impressive in its own way.

1. why are all the announcements only in Deutsche? So as a viewer, I DON'T relate at all to the proceedings.

Good question. I think that for the audience in the stadium, the announcements were translated into English and maybe also French on the scoreboards. And foreign TV viewers probably got a translation by their respective commentators. Maybe they thought back then that this is absolutely sufficient. It was a different time.

But I'll try to upload the translations for all announcements soon.

3. All those Bavarian folks dances on the track. So quaint, so kitsch, so lost.

It's part of the host region's culture, so why shouldn't it be represented in the ceremony? Maybe you consider it kitschy, but it's exactly what it looks like in real life.

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It's part of the host region's culture, so why shouldn't it be represented in the ceremony? Maybe you consider it kitschy, but it's exactly what it looks like in real life.

I understand that -- but they were staged like they were dancing in some street corner...just as a side attraction (on the track). Why on the fringes and not center stage? That's what I meant.

Skimping or being shy on spectacle just doesn't make sense. When you have the largest stage in history w/ both the largest live audience, and even more in their homes, what's the point? Then don't evne bother.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Once again: It was a different time, Baron -- and you who already lived back then should know that best. All Olympic host nations before the USSR in 1980 were shy of staging a big glitzy national showcase at the opening ceremony.

However, here are the translations of all the announcements and speeches at the Munich 1972 opening ceremony:

Clip 1

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: Ladies and gentlemen, in a few minutes more than 70 television and radio stations from all over the world will begin their broadcasts from the Olympic Stadium in Munich. Thousands of journalists are among us to comment on this event worldwide via satellite and to show in what a joyous and solemn community we are assembled here to celebrate the opening of the Games of the XX Olympiad. Journalists from all over the world have carried out enormous preparatory works and it takes unbelievably much to make this broadcast possible. I think that it’s not exaggerated to thank the journalists and technicians from all over the world for that.

In a few minutes, TV cameras from all over the world will be pointed at you, dear friends, dear citizens of Munich. It is recommendable to keep smiling from now on.

Ladies and gentlemen, only three minutes to go until the moment that for years, we all have been looking forward to.

Ladies and gentlemen, the patron of the Games of the XX Olympiad, President Gustav Heinemann, has arrived in front of the stadium where at this moment, he is welcomed by the president of the organising committee, Willi Daume, and the president of the International Olympic Committee, Avery Brundage.

Ladies and gentlemen, the president of the Federal Republic of Germany!

Clip 2

In accordance with tradition and Olympic regulation, the team of the nation which bestowed the Olympic Games upon the world has the honour to lead the parade of the participating nations.

Greece!

Egypt!

Ethiopia!

Afghanistan!

Albania!

Algeria!

Argentina!

Australia!

Bahamas!

Barbados!

Belgium!

Bermuda!

Bolivia!

Brazil!

British Honduras!

Bulgaria!

Clip 3

Birma!

Chile!

Costa Rica!

Denmark!

Dahomey!

GDR!

Dominican Republic!

DPR of Korea!

Ecuador!

Côte d’Ivoire!

El Salvador!

Fiji!

Finland!

France!

Gabon!

Ghana!

Great Britain!

Guatemala!

Clip 4

Guyana!

Haiti!

Hong Kong!

India!

Indonesia!

Iran!

Ireland!

Iceland!

Israel!

Italy!

Jamaica!

Japan!

Yugoslavia!

Virgin Islands!

Cambodia!

Cameroon!

Clip 5

Canada!

Kenya!

Colombia!

Congo!

Korea!

Cuba!

Kuwait!

Lesotho!

Lebanon!

Liberia!

Liechtenstein!

Luxembourg!

Madagascar!

Malawi!

Malaysia!

Clip 6

Mali!

Malta!

Morocco!

Mexico!

Monaco!

Mongolia!

Nepal!

New Zealand!

Nicaragua!

Netherlands!

Netherlands Antilles!

Niger!

Nigeria!

Norway!

Upper Volta!

Austria!

Clip 7

Pakistan!

Panama!

Paraguay!

Peru!

Philippines!

Poland!

Portugal!

Puerto Rico!

Republic of China!

Romania!

Zambia!

San Marino!

Saudi Arabia!

Clip 8

Sweden!

Switzerland!

Senegal!

Singapore!

Somalia!

Spain!

Sri Lanka (Ceylon)!

Sudan!

Suriname!

Swaziland!

Syria!

Tansania!

Thailand!

Togo!

Trinidad and Tobago!

Chad!

Clip 9

Czechoslovakia!

Turkey!

Tunisia!

USSR!

Uganda!

Hungary!

Uruguay!

USA!

Venezuela!

Vietnam!

Clip 10

Germany!

Clip 11

Girls and boys of Munich offer the greeting of the youth with self-made arcs and bouquets!

Willi Daume, president of the organising committee: Welcome, Olympic guests from all over the world, athletes, helpers, spectators! The hour we prepared for and looked forward to has arrived. May the Games give us happiness, great sport, excitement, maybe every now and then a little bit of emotion, and dignity. We wish us all a joint experience in this stadium, at all Olympic venues, in this city of Munich, in our country, on all five continents. Regardless of how each one of us might think about the purpose of Olympic Games, may he – even if we’re sometimes able to offer only imperfect and dismal solutions – recognise in them a celebration of hope and that the human beings overcome the separations and understand and respect each other. We thank the International Olympic Committee for entrusting us with the preparations. They are now completed. The Games of the XX Olympiad can begin. We welcome the president of our committee, Avery Brundage, who will now, after 20 years of his presidency and in accordance with the rules of the International Olympic Committee, address a head of state for the opening of the Games for the last time, today the president of the Federal Republic of Germany.

Clip 12

Avery Brundage, president of the International Olympic Committee: Mr. President, dear guests, ladies and gentlemen! Our German friends have given their best to arrange this meeting of the youth of the world in a dignified way. They have organised the Games splendidly and have created excellent venues. May all athletes show performances which make them proud, in the Olympic Spirit and the true spirit of sportsmanship. I have the honour of inviting the President of the Federal Republic of Germany, Mr. Gustav Heinemann, to declare open the XX Olympic Games of the modern era, reintroduced by Baron Pierre de Coubertin in 1896.

Gustav Heinemann, President of the Federal Republic of Germany: I declare open the Olympic Games Munich 1972, celebrating the XX Olympiad of the modern era!

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: To the strains of the Olympic Anthem, eight gold medal winners, the rowers of the eight of Mexico City 1968, will now hoist the Olympic Flag.

Clip 13

Accompanied by Mexican mariachis and the Ballet Folclórico Nacional de México, the mayor of Mexico City, Octavio Sentíes, will now return the traditional flag to IOC president Brundage who will pass it on to mayor Georg Kronawitter.

The flag which will be handed over now will be kept in Munich’s town hall for the next four years. This is what the Olympic regulations prescribe.

Bavarian musicians, dancers in traditional costumes and whip-crackers offer their thanks to the Mexicans. With the cracking of bull whips, a centuries-old custom, they express their joy.

Clip 14

Doves, fly! And announce to the world that the Games in Munich are opened!

Since July 28, 5758 runners are on their way to bring the fire lit by a sunray in Olympia from hand to hand to Munich. The young German torch bearer Günter Zahn who will come as last one through the marathon gate at any moment is accompanied by the runner Kipchoge Keino from Africa, the runner Jim Ryun from America, the runner Kenji Kimihara from Asia and the runner Derek Clayton from the fifth continent Oceania.

Clip 15

Now the Olympic Oath. In accordance with the regulations of the International Olympic Committee, a German athlete and a German judge will now take the Olympic Oath. For that purpose, the flag bearers of the participating nations gather around the podium.

At this point we most warmly welcome all the flags of all participating nations to Munich!

Heidi Schüller speaks on behalf of the athletes.

Heidi Schüller, taker of the athletes' Olympic Oath: In the name of all competitors, I promise that we will take part in these Olympic Games, respecting and abiding by the rules which govern them, in the true spirit of sportsmanship, for the glory of sport and the honour of our teams.

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: Heinz Pollay speaks on behalf of the judges.

Heinz Pollay, taker of the judges' Olympic Oath: In the name of all judges and officials, I promise that we will officiate in these Olympic Games with complete impartiality, respecting and abiding by the rules which govern them, in the true spirit of sportsmanship.

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: Cling to the old custom! Preserve your country! Stay away from the war! And give to the world a signal for brotherly friendship, when the time of the quadrennial Games approaches!

Clip 16

Our ceremony ends with the march-out of the nations. The Games of the XX Olympiad have begun. We wish all participants success and good competitions and us all a happy time for the 16 Olympic days!

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Question: Back then when the Opening Ceremony took place in the middle of the day, did competition sessions begin that same day as well? Or did they hold-off until the next day?

I would assume that for Nagano (and Seoul?), they started that night as the ceremony was in the morning.

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Models & Past Olympics Ceremony- 5:32

Re the fashion show in the Barcelona Opening, it never occurred to me that they tried to match up the models and the designs with the past host cities (and I was there...) :blink: I always thought...oh, OK, Latin country ... fashion show ... sure ... why not. (After all, they did this in the Italia '90 Opening -- a massive one at that; the Salt Lake Closing (Torino portion), and then in Torino again 2 years ago. You always learn something new each time you revisit the past, better Ceremonies.

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Question: Back then when the Opening Ceremony took place in the middle of the day, did competition sessions begin that same day as well? Or did they hold-off until the next day?

I would assume that for Nagano (and Seoul?), they started that night as the ceremony was in the morning.

It's quite possible -- and that was when the OCs were also held on a Saturday. Also, they had fewer events and countries at that time.

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Clip 13

Accompanied by Mexican mariachis and the Ballet Folclórico Nacional de México, the mayor of Mexico City, Octavio Sentíes, will now return the traditional flag to IOC president Brundage who will pass it on to mayor Georg Kronawitter.

The flag which will be handed over now will be kept in Munich’s town hall for the next four years. This is what the Olympic regulations prescribe.

Bavarian musicians, dancers in traditional costumes and whip-crackers offer their thanks to the Mexicans. With the cracking of bull whips, a centuries-old custom, they express their joy.

I haven't watched these YouTube clips yet, but what you say confirmed something I thought I remembered about the Munich Opening.

I was very young at the time (10) and it was held late in the night Oz time. I don't think I even watched the ceremony on TV here (it would have been in black and white), rather, I saw some clips on the news later that day I assume. I don't remember it well, but I'd always THOUGHT i remembered Mexican dancers, and now you confirm it!

In other words, the handover was part of the opening ceremony then? I assume the closings would have been very low-key events then too. When did this swap around and the closing became a lot more with the handover? And wouldn't this mean that some host, sometime, was short changed with having the Olympic Flag for four years _ having only got it at the start of the games and then handing it over at the end when they had their first closing handover? Anyone know which was it?

Montreal's was the first opening I remember watching live, but all I really remember from it is some folk dancers in ring and the Parade of Nations (yes, I was mesmerised by my first, but now I'm also of the opinion it's the most tedious part of the ceremonies). Did the Bavarian dancers also come and do a handover in Montreal?

Edited by Sir Roltel
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I haven't watched these YouTube clips yet, but what you say confirmed something I thought I remembered about the Munich Opening.

I was very young at the time (10) and it was held late in the night Oz time. I don't think I even watched the ceremony on TV here (it would have been in black and white), rather, I saw some clips on the news later that day I assume. I don't remember it well, but I'd always THOUGHT i remembered Mexican dancers, and now you confirm it!

In other words, the handover was part of the opening ceremony then? I assume the closings would have been very low-key events then too. When did this swap around and the closing became a lot more with the handover? And wouldn't this mean that some host, sometime, was short changed with having the Olympic Flag for four years _ having only got it at the start of the games and then handing it over at the end when they had their first closing handover? Anyone know which was it?

Montreal's was the first opening I remember watching live, but all I really remember from it is some folk dancers in ring and the Parade of Nations (yes, I was mesmerised by my first, but now I'm also of the opinion it's the most tedious part of the ceremonies). Did the Bavarian dancers also come and do a handover in Montreal?

They started ramping up the Closings w/ Montreal. (Munich's, understandably, was a memorial service.)

But Montreal had a little show biz in it: the 5 teepees tents which glowed, and then of course, Mr. Streaker makes his mark amongst all those virginal Montreal schoolgirls. http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=-FdMIXYhlqw

It also had the first Handover segment via a satellite transmission (the dance portion). But I don't recall the Flag handover...altho that would've been there.

Oh, those Quebecois!! ;)

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In other words, the handover was part of the opening ceremony then? I assume the closings would have been very low-key events then too. When did this swap around and the closing became a lot more with the handover? And wouldn't this mean that some host, sometime, was short changed with having the Olympic Flag for four years _ having only got it at the start of the games and then handing it over at the end when they had their first closing handover? Anyone know which was it?

Los Angeles was able to keep the Antwerp Flag only for the time of the Games in 1984. They received the flag at the opening ceremony (but not from the mayor of Moscow or any representatives of that city, since the Soviets boycotted the LA Games) and already passed it on to Seoul at the closing ceremony. So Los Angeles 1984 was the first time the handover was staged at the closing ceremony.

Montreal's was the first opening I remember watching live, but all I really remember from it is some folk dancers in ring and the Parade of Nations (yes, I was mesmerised by my first, but now I'm also of the opinion it's the most tedious part of the ceremonies). Did the Bavarian dancers also come and do a handover in Montreal?

Yes, they did. Shortly before the Sydney Games in 2000, a German TV channel broadcast Montreal's OC in its entirety. If I remember correctly, the choreography and music of the Bavarian segment of the handover were pretty much the same as four years earlier in Munich.

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They started ramping up the Closings w/ Montreal. (Munich's, understandably, was a memorial service.)

Not completely correct. Munich's closing ceremony was a mixture of some of the originally-scheduled festive performances and of a memorial service. They had already had a real memorial service in the Olympic Stadium on September 6, the day after the terrorist attack.

Here are some excerpts from Munich's CC, posted by the same guy who already posted the opening ceremony clips:

Munich 1972 Closing Ceremony

Translation of the announcements and speeches:

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: The hour of parting has arrived. The athletes bid farewell to us and we to them.

Avery Brundage, president of the International Olympic Committee: On behalf of the International Olympic Committee, I offer our sincere gratitude for the Games to the President, Mr. Gustav Heinemann, and the German people as well as to the local government of Munich and the organising committee. (Closing formula in English) Dear citizens of Munich, your cordial and amiable hospitality has moved us deeply. Together, we celebrated the days of shining joy and together with you, we endured the difficult hours of profoundest darkness. The time of parting has come. We return to our homes and call out to you all: Auf Wiedersehen!

Joachim Fuchsberger, PA announcer: Dear guests, dear citizens of Munich! That was the last official act of the outgoing 85-year-old IOC president. 60 years of his life were dedicated to the Olympic idea. At this moment, we want to thank him. Thank you, Avery Brundage!

The Olympic Flame burned for 17 days. Now it will be extinguished.

(Memory of the victims, in German, French and English)

Through the torchbearers' guard of honour, the athletes will leave the stadium for the last time. And now I kindly request you, ladies and gentlemen, to wave goodbye to the participants and the world with your flashlights.

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Folks, how can you download the Youtube videos and copy them to a disc?

keepvid.com or use the most recent version of the RealPlayer: If you have it installed and use the Internet Explorer for viewing the clips, you can download them via a menu bar which opens when you move the cursor across the video.

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Well, my videos are being targeted for copyright violations. I am getting sick of it and will delete my YouTube account soon.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I did it. My video uploads are complete. All there is to do is Beijing 2008 and I have both the CBC Canadian edition and the NBC American edition.

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Thank you very much for your efforts, Guardian. I suppose that that was an enormous task.

Another nice fellow just uploaded the complete Calgary 1988 opening ceremony, as it was broadcast by ABC:

YouTube playlist for the Calgary 1988 opening ceremony

Some may say that Calgary's OC was rather tacky, for example with that global "Can You Feel It" choir or the big "human pictures" of hockey players or ski jumpers (hello Torino, you copy cats...). But if you view it from a 1988 perspective, it probably was really innovative and impressive for that time. And even if leaving that "time shift" aside, I would say that Calgary did a good job, since it was a very joyous and somehow down-to-earth ceremony. I hope that after the rather philosophical (Athens 2004), technically-bombastic (Beijing 2008) or random (Torino 2006) ceremonial concepts of the most recent Olympics, Vancouver will stage a real feel-good ceremony again.

By the way: What I find very impressive -- even if viewed from a 2009 perspective -- is that big teepee structure they put up around the cauldron in Calgary. I think that it was a great backdrop for that huge flame. Too bad that, according to the official report (see here on page 186), the structure had to be lowered already during the ceremony because one of the guy cables of a scaffolding tower failed.

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..or the big "human pictures" of hockey players or ski jumpers (hello Torino, you copy cats...).

Well, it has been already pointed out here that the ski jumper section was taken from previous ceremony as it's quite common that some habits pass from one to another especially if there's Rick Birch &Co's behind. Not a big deal.

Shame on Toroc which wasn't able to find someone better and LOCAL to whom incharge of those ceremonies! :angry:

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I watched the ceremonies of the Calgary Winter Olympics and I don't understand what you mean by tacky. Apart from the awful timing of the commercials, it was a rather nice and there definitly was a warmth to the proceedings. I especially found the squar dancing segment to be very colourful

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