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2016 A Race Of Smaller Cities?


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What is the bidding schedule like for the 2016 games?

I think the deadline to submit a letter of intention to the IOC is sometime in the fall of 2007. Am I wrong?

Going by the past few races, that seems likely _ probably a call for submissions after the Guatemala City 2014 vote, and a deadline for later in the year.

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it will probably be about two weeks after the 2014 vote in Guatemala City for NOC's to send by letter the name of their candidate to the IOC, forming the official list of applicant cities...this is at least how it has been for the past few races for both the SOG and WOG

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Interesting, I heard and thought that the deadline for 2016 was March 31st, 2007.

What I remember about the 2014 WOG race, the deadline for letters of candidates from each country was due a couple weeks after London won the 2012 games.

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Fukuoka definitely lacks the international prestige but so did Barcelona before 92. I think Tokyo should be selected as the Japanese city but with the kind of proposal Fukuoka has, they might just surprise many people. Ofcourse, I'd mainly root for Fukuoka since it would dramatically increase the chance for a US city but that's beside the point. A 2020 bid for Tokyo would probably be better anyway (a lesson from NY, let a smaller city take the fall).

As for San Francisco, It isn't a "small" city but it still is in the shadow of NY and in some ways LA, even compared to Chicago it seems small. After Beijing and London, SF would seem a little toned down which is probably a good thing because the IOC has been throwing around the idea of downsizing the games, which 2012 threw out the window, but they might get their chance in 2016. San Francisco would offer the perfect balance of a very internationally recognized city in a smaller scale.

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Interesting, I heard and thought that the deadline for 2016 was March 31st, 2007.

I believe that's for the letter of intent. So that (1) the cities chosen by their NOC's can start to do a little schmoozing in the int'l confabs, like the Congress in Guatemala, and getting properly accredited; (2) then go into the next gear to aim to get on the 'Short List.'

It is also, I believe, the IAAF's deadline for accepting bids for their 2011 meet.

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As for San Francisco, It isn't a "small" city but it still is in the shadow of NY and in some ways LA, even compared to Chicago it seems small. After Beijing and London, SF would seem a little toned down which is probably a good thing because the IOC has been throwing around the idea of downsizing the games, which 2012 threw out the window, but they might get their chance in 2016. San Francisco would offer the perfect balance of a very internationally recognized city in a smaller scale.

But that doesn't mean the Games will be any less smaller. Look, Atlanta was only a city of 400,000 (in a metro area of some 1.7 mil -- I believe that's within a 25 mile radius, in 1996), yet it still hosted nearly 10,000 athletes and ALL the nations at the time.

It doesn't matter how large or small a host city is vis-a-vis the Games. It's the no. of sports that have to be cut down. Remember that this is like, 28 World Championships going at the same time. If you bring that down to just 20, then you may even bring down the # of participating athletes (and coaches, etc. to maybe 9,300). But even as you bring that down, remember the media credentials are probably in the 2,500-3,000 range as well (my rough guess).

Unless the scope of the Games are cut down -- in which case why they are starting w/ base/softball, then a smaller city like SF (and Atlanta) will have a harder time staging a more compact Games because obviously (1) it has less open land on which to build new venues; therefore (2) it has to spread out its venues more, reaching out to more communities around since they will have additional, existing venues -- therefore still making it a 'spread out' Games, as opposed say to huge cities like a London, a Beijing or a Tokyo, a New York or a Sao Paulo -- who have the land and critical mass to mow down and create new clusters of sports venues within their existing borders as they see fit. (SF, unfortunately is both blessed and cursed by being a peninsula surrounded by a Bay.)

So, the scaling down has to start with the IOC and the Federations. Some sports will just have to bite the bullet to make them a more manageable Games. And until that happens, it'll really be harder for smaller cities to take on the scope of the SUmmer Games as they are constituted right now.

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Fukuoka definitely lacks the international prestige but so did Barcelona before 92. I think Tokyo should be selected as the Japanese city but with the kind of proposal Fukuoka has, they might just surprise many people. Ofcourse, I'd mainly root for Fukuoka since it would dramatically increase the chance for a US city but that's beside the point. A 2020 bid for Tokyo would probably be better anyway (a lesson from NY, let a smaller city take the fall).

There's a very big difference.Barcelona had the help and encouragement of none other than the IOC President himself,Juan Antonio Samaranch,who happened to be a native of Barcelona! Fukuoka won't have THAT kind of support and assistance in its battle with the big-guns!

It is not impossible for Fukuoka but it will have more of an uphill battle than any previous second-tier bid city,in my opinion.It would have its work cut out against the international appeal of San Francisco or Chicago or even,dare I say it,Madrid.Against such competition,the JOC would be much better advised to go with Tokyo!!

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There's a very big difference.Barcelona had the help and encouragement of none other than the IOC President himself,Juan Antonio Samaranch,who happened to be a native of Barcelona! Fukuoka won't have THAT kind of support and assistance in its battle with the big-guns!

It is not impossible for Fukuoka but it will have more of an uphill battle than any previous second-tier bid city,in my opinion.It would have its work cut out against the international appeal of San Francisco or Chicago or even,dare I say it,Madrid.Against such competition,the JOC would be much better advised to go with Tokyo!!

Meh. Toyko - been there, done that. Why I remember my dad plopping my in front of the t.v. and watching the opening of the 1964 games. :D Granted I was only 6 months old but have been having repressed memory therapy sessions.

So you see it is too soon for Tokyo to host again. Time to go to a new frontier (well, new in Japan that is . . .) Fukuoka!!!!!

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Meh. Toyko - been there, done that. Why I remember my dad plopping my in front of the t.v. and watching the opening of the 1964 games. :D Granted I was only 6 months old but have been having repressed memory therapy sessions.

So you see it is too soon for Tokyo to host again. Time to go to a new frontier (well, new in Japan that is . . .) Fukuoka!!!!!

You know,I think you may be right!! Perhaps I should cut and paste your post and e-mail it out to all the members of the IOC at once so they can bear this in mind if its between Fukuoka and an American city come the vote in 2009!

Do you think that would be a good move to help boost Fukuoka's chances?? B)

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There's a very big difference.Barcelona had the help and encouragement of none other than the IOC President himself,Juan Antonio Samaranch,who happened to be a native of Barcelona! Fukuoka won't have THAT kind of support and assistance in its battle with the big-guns!

It is not impossible for Fukuoka but it will have more of an uphill battle than any previous second-tier bid city,in my opinion.It would have its work cut out against the international appeal of San Francisco or Chicago or even,dare I say it,Madrid.Against such competition,the JOC would be much better advised to go with Tokyo!!

I wasn't comparing Fukuoka to Barcelona in it's ability to land the games, but rather the legacy an Olympics would leave to the city.

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