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Beijing Olympic Torch Relay


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It looks like that the Chinese embassy in Athens is upset with the Hellenic Olympic Comittee.

More or less they blame the Comittee for the reactions of the Tibetians at the lighting of the flame and during the torch relay.

They make a mess in Tibet and it's Greece's fault!

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So, who were the people that tried to destroy the ceremony?

3 activists from 'Journalists without frontiers'.

They tried to stop the speach of the president of BOCOG, screaming for Tibet and holding black flags. Police officers captured them, and the president of BOCOG continuedv his speach with stronger voice.

Between the 3 activists was the secretary of the organization, who was honoured on Sunday by the French president.

The 3 activists were captured and till now (18:00 local time) they are hold at the police station of Ancient Olympia and they wait to be prosecuted to the Greek justice.

During the torch relay, a Swiss citizen of Tibetian origins, put ketchup all over her body and layed on the street before the flame passes. Police captured her (and also a German citizen that tried to stop them - the German is free), and they will prosecute her to the justice.

Also another 3 people were captured. A Japanese having a small knife when he tried to enter the site of the lighting of the flame, and a US and a Greek citizen that were in the team that tried to light a flame on 10th March inside Ancient Olympia. These 3 are free.

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The ketchup lady

newego_LARGE_t_1101_708907_type11491.jpg

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Did anyone just catch the interview on the BBC with Kate Howey(ex sports minister). She pretty much just urged people in the Uk to protest when the torch hits London. She also called for Gordon Brown to boycott the opening ceremony along with all British officials. She was really quite vocal and didn't hold back at all. I was quite shocked.

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well - I think the most interesting thing is how the IOC reacts - to defend its decision for Beijing seven years ago the IOC generated the hope to improve the human rights in the PR of China to take the wind out of the western critics sails.

Now it becomes more and more evident that the IOC promised, what it can't acquit...

I do not support a boycott, but I demand something more than such lip service by Rogge - the IOC has to face the music, which it brought onto itself...

Edited by Citius Altius Fortius
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Jacques Rogge was speaking on the BBC a few hours ago. I caught the last 5 secs so can't say what he actually said. I got the impression that he was rather concerned to say the least, from what I did hear.

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@caf

They didn't write anything about the fires in Ancient Olympia last summer, a non hot topic, what makes you believe that they will write about today?

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I have the feeling that Roggue wants the old days back.

Running after the Greeks wondering if the stadiums will be ready, if OAKA roof will be in place, if all the seats of the stadiums will be there, why there is no roof at the swimming pool. Good old days! No politics no nothing...

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@caf

They didn't write anything about the fires in Ancient Olympia last summer, a non hot topic, what makes you believe that they will write about today?

... mmhh - isn't there a part in the article about the couragous firemen, who saved Olympia?

quote from the IOC-website:

Tribute to the firemen

Before the torch lighting ceremony, President Rogge also took the opportunity to pay tribute to the firemen who took part in the heroic fight to save Olympia from the flames last autumn.

Following the tragic fires that raged in Greece, the IOC President wrote to the Greek Prime Minister to offer the condolences of the Ol0mpic Movement, and express its gratitude to and admiration for the fire-fighters and volunteers who risked their lives to save others. He sent his thanks in particular to those who saved Olympia, the birthplace of the Olympic Games, the site where the heart of Baron Pierre de Coubertin rests, and the headquarters of the International Olympic Academy. The IOC President wrote “it is a great tragedy which has struck Greece and its people, and I should like to express our deepest sympathy with all those who have been affected. Although it is of secondary importance faced with the loss of human life, I should also like to express our gratitude to all those who took part in this heroic fight to save Olympia”.

I have the feeling that Roggue wants the old days back.

Running after the Greeks wondering if the stadiums will be ready, if OAKA roof will be in place, if all the seats of the stadiums will be there, why there is no roof at the swimming pool. Good old days! No politics no nothing...

:lol: :lol: :lol:

you are right

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I have the feeling that Roggue wants the old days back.

Running after the Greeks wondering if the stadiums will be ready, if OAKA roof will be in place, if all the seats of the stadiums will be there, why there is no roof at the swimming pool. Good old days! No politics no nothing...

I don't think so. That was too much work and too much tension.

The security of the Torch Relay is really BOCOG's headache -- not the IOC's. If BOCOG had not been too ambitious, then they could've staged it entirely within Chinese borders and there probably would be no incidents -- or at least that the outside world wouldn't hear of.

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And Chinese officials do disserve today's drama, to say the least.

Why do you say this? I believe they are doing their part as the next SOG host -- receiving the flame before sending it off on its journey. How different is that from previous transfers of the flame and from future ones? Whether you agree with their politics or not, the CCP is the party in power in China and are the ones you and the IOC and everybody else has to deal with.

So if by 2012, for example, the Tories would be in power, and you personally don't like them -- so you would say that the British officials do a disservice to the flame? :blink:

I don't think one's personal feelings are valid in the least. You and the others have to accept that it is the CCP that is in charge. It is no different than in previous Olympiads. Just a different stripe of animal. Only the IOC can cancel the Games of next summer; and I believe they will keep their commitment with the Chinese. A contract is a contract by any other name.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Suggestions that the IOC should involve themselves in the debate over China's human rights record or whether Tibet is indeed China are ridiculous.

It is not the IOC's place to sit in judgement of other nations and their policies - they have to try to remain impartial and by not publically acknowleging the protests is perhaps the safest road to take at the moment. If the IOC were to publicly declare their views on Chinese policies what would stop them criticising the United States over the invasion of Iraq or it's continued sanctions against Cuba, or to criticise Russia for the use of oil and gas to blackmail its neighbours, or France and Britain's unfair trade policies with the Third World. It's not any of the IOC's business.

Many people around the world are frustrated by China's domestic policies towards their own people - however, this frustration should not be directed at the IOC - it should be directed at our national governments, all of whom remain incredibly reluctant to criticise China.

I wish China gave far more attention to the rights of its citizens - if it had then perhaps the protesters wouldn't have felt the need to politicise these Games. What I fear now is that all subsequent Games are now going to be subjected to pressure group politics - Animal rights protesters against the culling of seals disrupting the Vancouver torch relay or the biathlon, or anti-globalisation protesters disrupting the marathon or the Opening Ceremony in London.

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Many people around the world are frustrated by China's domestic policies towards their own people - however, this frustration should not be directed at the IOC - it should be directed at our national governments, all of whom remain incredibly reluctant to criticise China.

Of course the IOC can't change anything in China, but it sowed the hope in the western nations, that China change a little bit with the Olympic Games, due it wanted to take the wind out of the critics sails - now it has to face the music...

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What I fear now is that all subsequent Games are now going to be subjected to pressure group politics - Animal rights protesters against the culling of seals disrupting the Vancouver torch relay or the biathlon, or anti-globalisation protesters disrupting the marathon or the Opening Ceremony in London.

Oh, every little thing, Stu. So for the next one, they don't like the eyebrow of this or that leader, etc., etc.

There are these professional agitators who use all their 'causes' as an excuse really for their own travel. World Bank meetings, the G8 meetings, etc., etc. There is this bitch-slut here in the Bay Area, a Medea Benjamin, co-founder of MoveOn, and of course, allied with Code Pink. When she was asked how she could afford to go to all these events as a protestor and get arrested, w/o a regular job and NO independent means of her own. She candidly replied, with some honesty -- that they just put out the call on their websites, and donations from their fellow fools, just come in to cover their expenses. Suckers!!

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Of course the IOC can't change anything in China, but it sowed the hope in the western nations, that China change a little bit with the Olympic Games, due it wanted to take the wind out of the critics sails - now it has to face the music...

CAF, the IOC did NOT promise anything. It is the outsiders' who have a timetable who are holding China and the IOC accountable.

If I were a nation, and outsiders were agitating me to make changes. I too would be pissed and would fight back. Who are the outsiders to dictate how and when I (as a sovereign nation), should make my changes and directions of my own destiny?

Maybe changes will come slowly within and over a few years.

Everyone's a drama queen when it comes to these Olympic years -- since they all can't partake of Opening or Closing Ceremonies.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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There is also Ekechereia, the Olympic Truce revived by Athens 2004 and adopted by the IOC. Well we now that it is impossible for all wars to stop during the Olympic Games as in Ancient times but atleast the hosting Country should be in a polemic-free condition!!!!

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Of course the IOC can't change anything in China, but it sowed the hope in the western nations, that China change a little bit with the Olympic Games, due it wanted to take the wind out of the critics sails - now it has to face the music...

It's far too early to judge whether these Olympics have changed anything in China - they haven't even happened yet! South Korea's political and economic transformation took years; and still takes place today.

There was an occasion a couple of decades ago where a Chinese diplomat was asked to state what the consequences of the French Revolution of 1789 were - he replied that it was still too early to tell.

Edited by Stu
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CAF, the IOC did NOT promise anything. It is the outsiders' who have a timetable who are holding China and the IOC accountable.

I am not sure about that, since on the German news Rogge is quoted with (source below):

Das IOC hoffe, der Tibet-Konflikt werde so bald als möglich friedlich beigelegt werden, die Spiele könnten auch ein Katalysator sein für eine Veränderung in dem Land.

translation: The IOC hopes, that the conflict about Tibet will be settled peacefully as soon as possilbe, the Games could be a catalyator for changes in the country.

I would like emphasise that I know that Olympic Games can't do that - I am just annoyed about the IOC, that it tries to "defend" its decision to hold the games in a dictatorship and still "claiming" that the country might change with these games...

Tagesschau - Erste Störung auf der "Reise der Harmonie" (First disruption on the "Voyage of Harmony"

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............ and still "claiming" that the country might change with these games...

I think that an event the size of the Olympics will undoubtedly change a previously very closed China - it was always unlikely that this change would be into a liberal democracy within the space of seven years.

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