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Full Chicago 2016 Plan Out


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The Full Chicago 2016 Plan has been announced, with venues really only in the city, and only Wisconsin and Indiana recieving ANY other venues.

Opening and Closing Ceremonies: A strange concept, with athletes entering Soldier Field, then crossing a bridge where they would enter the main Olympic Stadium. Entertainment would be offerd in both.

Track and Field: In New Olympic Stadium

Olympic Village: Would sit on publicly owned property just south of the McCormick Place Complex that are west of Lake Shore Drive. Village would later be sold as private/ residential housing as well as commercial space.

Olympic Park: Would be located east of Lake Shore Drive between Soldier Field and 35th Street.

16 of 38 Olympic Events would be located in McCormick Place.

IBC would be located at McCormick Place.

Archery would be located on Northerly Island.

A New Permenant Aquatics Centre which would cost $130,000,000, would be located between Lake Shore Drive and the Dan Ryan Expressway near the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Training Sites would be located at Northwestern University, the University of Illinois- Chicago and Whitney Young High School.

Football would be held at:

2 at Nortre Dame

1 at UW-Wisconsin

1 at Bridgeview Soccer Centre

1 at Soldier Field

1 at Northwestern

Canoe slalom would be located in downtown South Bend, IN

Basketball- Allstate Arena

Hawthorne Race Course- Equestrian, Modern Pentathlon

Maywood- Shooting

Palos Hills Forest Preserve- Mountain Biking

Here's the whole kit and kaboodle, all from the Chicago Tribune

Rowing Basin would be located east of Lake Shore Drive at 35th Street in Downtown Chicago

Link:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/custom/...ll=chi-news-hed

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I've been reading up on the plans, and still can't get my head around the two-stadiums for ceremonies concept. Apart from the fact that I'm not sure how it would work, there's the whole issue of how the IOC would accept it. And then there's the march of nations _ does this mean you'll start by having the athletes march into one stadium, and then they'll continue the march into the other? Jeez, it's long enough already!

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Is it just me or is Chicago dead in the water with their temporary stadium / Soldier Field plan? Sounds painfully half-baked to me. Sort of like the 99 Cent Store approach to Olympic organization. The IOC is NOT going to be impressed. I think Chicago has enormous potential as a host city. Prior to their pitiful stadium plans I thought they were by far the strongest contender, but now I'm afraid they can kiss the Games goodbye. The USOC would have to be blind to put their faith in such a slipshod plan. No way is Peter Ueberroth going to be suckered into that one. Chicago could be the heavy favorite for 2016, but only with a brand new (permanent) stadium.

Forgive me if I'm repeating what others have said on other threads....

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By the way the article makes it out, the athletes would be making a sort of journey along the walk, from Soldier Field to the Olympic Stadium.

Along the way athletes would see references in mulitiple ways of the history of the Olympics, like Baron Pierre de Coubrtien and past Olympics, along with the telling of the history of Chicago and the Midwest.

I guess something like 3-D Holograms and mist machines along the walk would be used or just plaques.

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Ok, first of all, it's a very compact plan. A good job by the city planners on that note.

The plan has a lot of questions though. 1st and foremost is security. For logistics, it might be the best plan as it is really compact, but in a post-9/11 world the area of the convention center in Chicago being the most crime-ridden area in Cook County (I've read it somewhere in either USAToday or another DC newspaper, I just forgot where that was), then add to that my horrible traffic experience during the Chicago International Auto Show, on a Sunday, this would present numerous security problems, and traffic nightmares. Unlike NYC which had a compact plan, Chicago's plan is too compact and not sprawled enough to avoid those type of problems.

Then as what some had already mentioned, the question of having 2 stadiums on how the USOC and the IOC will accept it.

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By the way the article makes it out, the athletes would be making a sort of journey along the walk, from Soldier Field to the Olympic Stadium.

Along the way athletes would see references in mulitiple ways of the history of the Olympics, like Baron Pierre de Coubrtien and past Olympics, along with the telling of the history of Chicago and the Midwest.

I guess something like 3-D Holograms and mist machines along the walk would be used or just plaques.

ChicagoFan90, your link requires membership. Can u just reprint the whole article? Thanks.

Obviously, this Ceremonies stuff is just early PR buzz.

#1 - The IOC hasn't vetted that plan yet.

#2 - They don't have professional Ceremonies people in charge yet. Logistically, it's not going to work out. But what it'll boil down to, is the usual way Ceremonies are done. The athletes and Ceremonies people assemble in the 2ndary stadium, in the 'holding tank' so to speak; and wait there until they are ready to come out onto the main Stadium where the major show will be. So, Soldiers Field would in effect, be acting as the 'backstage' to the 'front' stage at the new Stadium. The Chicago bid writers are just trying to give it a new twist. Doesn't mean it's going to happen.

But what I don't understand about Chicago's PR material so far, is they can't get thei numbers right. The IOC wants to put a cap on athlete participation at 10.500 (or bring that even farther down to an even 10,000). Chicago comes out with a 12,000 number. I mean, at least get the numbers right -- or close to it.

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Is it just me or is Chicago dead in the water with their temporary stadium / Soldier Field plan? Sounds painfully half-baked to me.

It's just you. <_<:)

London has a temporary stadium of sorts as well. Until we see exactly what the plan is for the temporary stadium in Chicago it cannot be dismissed. Especially with Chicago's record of getting major construction projects done and creating architectural masterpieces.

Besides, these plans are always modified to death before the final vote.

The plan is a great start so far, although I do hope that the USOC/IOC puts the kabosh on that 2 stadium opening/closing plan. Although, it would be a great revenue generator to do it that way so the IOC might absolutely love it from that perspective. <_<

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I really don't like that two stadium ceremony concept, but everything els sounds solid.

Well put. The two stadium ceremony concept sounds ridiculous. Everything else sounds great.

I don't think the temporary stadium is a big deal. If it can hold 80,000 people, who the heck cares if it's only "temporary?" The IOC should be praising this type of creativity and resourcefulness, instead of awarding the Games to whichever city promises to spend the most money or build the most white elephants.

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Here's the whole Article from the Tribune for people who can't access the site.

Olympics bid tries new concepts

By Philip Hersh

Tribune Olympic sports reporter

Published July 12, 2006, 9:34 PM CDT

Chicago's initial proposal for the 2016 Olympic Games includes the unprecedented idea of having Opening and Closing ceremonies in two stadiums: Soldier Field and an 80,000-seat temporary track stadium attached to the Lakeside Center of McCormick Place.

That concept, which might be a tough sell to the International Olympic Committee, is the most striking part of the Olympic bid plan Chicago has drawn up, according to Tribune sources familiar with the plan.

"We have presented and are considering multiple concepts for an Olympic stadium, track and field venue and Opening and Closing ceremonies, and we are not married to a single concept," said Michael Segobiano, director of marketing for the city.

Other key elements of the Chicago plan include:

--Private funding for about $600 million in construction at new and existing venues and for a $1.4 billion Olympic Village to house about 15,000 athletes, coaches and officials.

The village would sit on publicly owned property just south of the McCormick Place buildings that are west of Lake Shore Drive. The village buildings later would be sold as private residences and retail/commercial space.

--With an eye toward revitalization of the lakefront south of downtown, there would be a large concentration of sports events and an Olympic Park east of Lake Shore Drive between Soldier Field and 35th Street.

Combined with the proposed location of the Olympic Village, that would put nearly 75 percent of the athletes within a mile of their competition sites.

Competition in 16 of the 38 disciplines on the Olympic program as of 2012, including sports such as fencing, wrestling and weightlifting, would take place at McCormick Place, which also would be the site of the Main Press Center and International Broadcast Center. An archery venue would be built on Northerly Island.

--A new aquatics center, a permanent facility to cost approximately $130 million in private funding, would be between Lake Shore Drive and the Dan Ryan Expressway near the Illinois Institute of Technology.

--Facilities at Northwestern University, the University of Illinois-Chicago and Whitney Young High School would be used extensively as training sites.

The idea that this is a Midwest bid is being emphasized, with political leaders in Indiana, Wisconsin and Michigan expressing support to the USOC even though only two events-soccer preliminaries at Notre Dame and whitewater canoe/kayak in South Bend-would be beyond the Chicago metropolitan area.

Chicago is among five cities that presented preliminary plans to U.S. Olympic Committee officials last month in California. Los Angeles, San Francisco, Houston and Philadelphia also offered proposals.

The USOC has yet to make a formal decision on having a candidate for 2016, although all indications point to a U.S. bid. The IOC membership, currently 114 people, will pick the 2016 host in October 2009.

"We have a technical committee evaluating the material submitted by each of the cities, and we are looking forward to receiving that report from that committee in the next few weeks,'' USOC spokesman Darryl Seibel said. "The assessment offered by this team of experts will be important in answering the first question before us: deciding whether or not to bid."

Other likely international candidates include Madrid, Rio de Janeiro, Tokyo or Fukuoka, Japan, Berlin or Hamburg, Germany, and Moscow. An Olympics never has been held in South America.

While Olympic plans often change substantially, even after a city has been selected as host, the blueprint in the initial bid plan will be significant in the USOC's decision on a bid city. The USOC may ask cities to modify elements of their plans before picking a candidate.

"At this point, we are not discussing the specifics of what any city has submitted," Seibel said.

Chicago's concept of a two-stadium Opening and Closing ceremonies could be a cash cow, making it possible to sell 150,000 tickets. The Opening Ceremony always is the highest-priced event on the Olympic program.

The idea calls for entertainment in both stadiums and, at least for the opening, having the 10,500 athletes march from one stadium to another, which means the already seemingly interminable athletes' parade would drag on even longer. That is sure to draw criticism from athletes who already feel discomfited by the length of the process.

"Currently, such an idea would not be compatible with Games operations," IOC spokeswoman Giselle Davies said. "However, the IOC is always open to ideas and proposals, which, if made, would be discussed and studied."

It is not clear why the city has proposed the idea of dual opening and closing ceremonies beyond perhaps the extra revenue they might bring in, although giving more people the opportunity to experience the events may have influenced the decision.

Connecting the two venues with a walkway for athletes would create a series of challenges, but the plan reportedly includes references along the walk to modern Olympic founder Baron Pierre de Coubertin and legendary Chicago city planner Daniel Burnham.

Soldier Field also would be used for some soccer matches. The track stadium, to be dismantled after the Paralympics (the host city stages them as well) and used elsewhere in a variety of forms, would be the site for track and field, including the start and finish of the marathons. A temporary warmup track would be installed on the roof of Lakeside Center.

Among other significant features of the plan is a group of facilities, including the rowing basin and field hockey areas, east of Lake Shore Drive at about 35th Street.

The United Center would be site of the two most popular Olympic Games indoor events: gymnastics and the basketball medal rounds.

Other than South Bend, the only sites in the plan beyond the immediate downtown area are Northwestern (soccer); Allstate Arena (basketball); Bridgeview (soccer); Hawthorne Race Course (equestrian, modern pentathlon); Maywood (shooting) and the Palos Hills Forest Preserve (mountain biking).

phersh@tribune.com

Copyright © 2006, Chicago Tribune

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could someone show me the sites of the various venues on google earth...i wanna do a little rendering

Here you go -

Chicago2016.jpg

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I would agree with baron that the 2 stadium plan is just a PR stunt to attract attention at this point. Any publicity is good publicity.

As for a previous poster's concern about the crime, I have a very hard time believing that the area around McCormick Place and Soldier Field is the worst in the city. I ride my bike down there on the lakefront path and it's never been a problem.

Here's a nifty website that plots crimes in the past 2 weeks for any part of Chicago. McCormick Place is police beat 133. Check out for yourself where the bad parts of the city are.

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Here's a better diagram:

24361926.jpg

As for the convention center being the most crime-ridden part of the city that is incorrect. The South Side is down around 40th St. is where the majority of crimes occur and a few pockets on the West Side. There is a lot of gentrification going on around Soldier Field and McCormick place.

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Rowing lagoon -- in a circle? Did I miss the change in rowing directions? Are they going to row in a circle now?

I don't think that Lakeside location will pass with the Int'l Rowing Federation. It has to be in a still, protected-inlet-type setting. Besides, the whole rowing course would have to be at least 2200m long x 50m wide.

My main comment about this Chicago plan so far: I think it's too congested at the heart. That's going to be a scheduling nightmare. They are cramming FAR too MANY sports in a very tight area. There is going to be horrible pedestrian gridlock.

And the double-stadium Ceremony idea? Huh? I dunno -- it just seems to mask the chintziness of a 'temporary' stadium. Immediately, Chicago cuts itself out on 'Legacy' points.

Recommendation for Chicago: build a permanent stadium (then tear down Soldiers Field afterwards); and spread out the venues just a little more.

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Rowing lagoon -- in a circle? Did I miss the change in rowing directions? Are they going to row in a circle now?

I don't think that Lakeside location will pass with the Int'l Rowing Federation. It has to be in a still, protected-inlet-type setting. Besides, the whole rowing course would have to be at least 2200m long x 50m wide.

My main comment about this Chicago plan so far: I think it's too congested at the heart. That's going to be a scheduling nightmare. They are cramming FAR too MANY sports in a very tight area. There is going to be horrible pedestrian gridlock.

And the double-stadium Ceremony idea? Huh? I dunno -- it just seems to mask the chintziness of a 'temporary' stadium. Immediately, Chicago cuts itself out on 'Legacy' points.

Recommendation for Chicago: build a permanent stadium (Build a new one, then tear down Soldiers Field afterwards); and spread out the venues just a little more.

Personally, I'm thinking more and more that the USOC will go with Los Angeles on this one.

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Personally, I'm thinking more and more that the USOC will go with Los Angeles on this one.

I am soooooooo looking forward to seeing the plans from SF, LA, Houston and Philly <_<

Assuming, of course, that they even make the final list :P

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I am soooooooo looking forward to seeing the plans from SF, LA, Houston and Philly <_<

Assuming, of course, that they even make the final list :P

I haven't heard ANYTHING from Houston.

I'm stunned to hear they're still interested. :lol:

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Personally, I'm thinking more and more that the USOC will go with Los Angeles on this one.

Nope; the 3rd time charm won't work for LA. If LA were giving the IOC a WHOLE new set of venues, then maybe, yes. But the centerpiece is still the 80-year old Memorial stadium; and where will LA's Village be? Not unless they add more dorms to UCLA (which is plausible to me; not USC.) Then having the Village in one end of town; the Coliseum in another, just isn't the most desirable scenario.

Pending what Philly will show, it's definitely between Chicago and San Fran. And that's going to be a tough one. But I think SF's 'European-ness' might be a deciding factor.

I'm stunned to hear they're still interested. :lol:

They may be; but the USOC probably isn't. The only reason the USOC threw them in, was because they were persistent and there is a lot of oil money down there. But those aren't enough to overcome a horrible summer climate.

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I am soooooooo looking forward to seeing the plans from SF, LA, Houston and Philly <_<

Assuming, of course, that they even make the final list :P

Getting a little smug aren't we. ;)

...besides the point, Philly is awaiting word from the USOC as to whether or not they want to even go for the 2016 games, so they're being low-key ... unlike Chicago. :P

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Personally, I'm thinking more and more that the USOC will go with Los Angeles on this one.

looks good, although I agree with Baron especially on the venues seeming to be just way too congested and the whole two stadium idea...that is still not the new permanent stadium the IOC is looking for....

as for the USOC going with LA I think that is unlikely and would be one of the biggest mistakes that they could make...however I am personally still uncertain and 100% convinced that they will bid since all these cities seem to have glitches in their plans that may stick out...but in the end I hope they will...

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looks good, although I agree with Baron especially on the venues seeming to be just way too congested and the whole two stadium idea...that is still not the new permanent stadium the IOC is looking for....

as for the USOC going with LA I think that is unlikely and would be one of the biggest mistakes that they could make...however I am personally still uncertain and 100% convinced that they will bid since all these cities seem to have glitches in their plans that may stick out...but in the end I hope they will...

That's why I think LA could be picked.

It will have a competent, boring plan, but the other cities all have flaws.

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Getting a little smug aren't we. ;)

...besides the point, Philly is awaiting word from the USOC as to whether or not they want to even go for the 2016 games, so they're being low-key ... unlike Chicago. :P

Hey Thrillos, Philly isn't saying what it's main stadium plan(s) will be? I think that's the whole crux of the American quest for 2016 -- which city can banish the terrible faux pas of the 2012 New York bid.

Going back to the double-stadium announcement of Chicago. I wish they had checked their figures more before opening their flap. On the surface, it sounds good. But in reality, it is al Qaeda's dream scenario and a giant catastrophe waiting to happen.

1. How do you get some 164,000 people onto 40 acres of land in place for a 2-1/2 hour show; and then dispersed quickly after that? Why, processing alone would take a day-and-a-half to get everybody thru metal detectors; get sniffed by bomb dogs, open up each backpack, all security measures, etc. .

- You would need to have the "L" running trains every 2 minutes to drop off full trains for maybe 5 hours to get the people there.

(I've computed 80,000 spectators for the 'temp' stadium; 62,000 for Soldiers' Field; 14,000 - venue workers, security and Ceremonies performers; I'd say at least 7,500 atheltes. I predict the IOC will cut down athelete participation in OCs after Beijing because their marching in alone takes nearly 3 hours. )

2. How do you get emergency vehicles thru? There's bound to be a heart attack or 2 in that # of people.

3. How do you get everybody outta there and home in 2 hours? No way. It would take at least 4 hours to get everybody out of the 2 stadia.

The idea is TOTALLY unworkable and their trumpeting it is quite amateurish.

Sorry, LA84. I had to call this.

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My main comment about this Chicago plan so far: I think it's too congested at the heart. That's going to be a scheduling nightmare. They are cramming FAR too MANY sports in a very tight area. There is going to be horrible pedestrian gridlock.

Not just pedestrian gridlock baron. As I've stated before, I've been in this area during the Chicago International Auto Show. Traffic was the worst I've seen, it's like my hometown Manila. Cars that just want to get in the entrances to the parking lots. And of all days, on a Sunday!

Honestly, this looks like the West Side Stadium with 10 times worse potential problems.

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