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Zidane's Red Card


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Good article. Thank you. If FIFA is to be credible, then it has to mete out some sanction against the Italian players as well. True, they baited ZZ and he blew his top; but not without provocation. I am beginning to see now that there are always 2 sides to every story. And the man was baited. Does not mitigate his actions; but it should be weighed against what set it off. And FIFA should do something decisive about it!

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Yes they should. However, I think asking for the World Cup to be taken from Italy is far, far too harsh as is banning them from 2010. It was one player who made one remark (do we even know if this is what he said) and punishing the rest of his teamates in a manner that harsh would be totally disproportionate.

Maybe a start would be to increase the fines they give to players. The red carded players who showed violent conduct received fines of abour £3000. Perhaps FIFA should take into account the fact that most players earn at least twice that in a single day.

Also, if players have retired or are about to retire from international football, why not ban them from playing for their club side for a while? Surely FIFA have such powers available to them if necessary.

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The truth comes up in portions -- now Materazzi at least admitted that he insulted Zidane. But still he claims that he doesn't know what the word "terrorist" means (and at the same time says that his 10-month-old daughter is a terrorist... :blink::wacko: ) and that he didn't use that word towards Zidane or insulted his mother.

He adds:

"It was the type of insults that we've heard before so many times on the pitch, and sometimes we don't even notice it."

Wow, Marco -- is it really usual for you to be called the son of a terrorist bi*ch on the field? Then you certainly have to play with the worst dickhe*ds who ever populated this earth.

See: http://www.eurosport.com/football/worldcup...sto923758.shtml

Let's see -- if we wait another day, there'll certainly come up another portion.

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You have to admire Zizou for not resorting to rugby tactics and punching Materazzi's head in or delivering an undignified Cantona kungfu kick.

Instead he kept his form and delivered a beautiful header. It was forceful and spiked - had he been aiming for the ball in the penalty area Buffon would have had no chance. All delivered with a minimum of fuss and no verbal abuse of Materazzi or putting the boot in when he was down - which i thought was very civilised.

As for Materazzi - I think what he said will become public knowledge in the next few days and if there was a racist element - then FIFA will have no option but to red card him as well.

Right over your head wasn't it?

OK, but he resorted to wrestling tactics instead. :rolleyes:

You sound like you're praising this guy's actions. Beautiful header? It was one of the ugliest actions I've ever seen a soccer legend take.Despite whatever Materazzi said, Zidane should never have headbutted him. It's the final of your last World Cup, and you let not just your country, but the whole world down. It's a shame that he'll be remembered this way.

Right over your head wasn't it!

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News, news, news.

Now there's another development in the whole story -- or at least a new interesting background information.

German news magazine Spiegel hints that if Materazzi can be proved for having given racist remarks in his encounter with Zidane, FIFA could disqualify Italy and thus deprive it of the World Cup victory. This is part of the new anti-racism regulations FIFA introduced in March.

The article quotes article 55, paragraph 4 of the FIFA disciplinary regulation:

Par. 4: If any player, association or club official or spectator perpetrates any kind of

discriminatory or contemptuous act as described by par. 1 and/or 2 of this article, three

points will automatically be deducted from the team concerned, if identifiable, after the first

offence. In the case of a second offence, six points will automatically be deducted, and for a

further offence, the team will be relegated.

In the case of matches without points, the team concerned, if identifiable, will be

disqualified.

(Source: http://www.fifa.com/documents/media/Revisi...nary%20Code.pdf)

The mentioned paragraph 1 speaks of discriminations "against or denigrates someone in a defamatory

manner on account of race, colour, language, religion or ethnic origin.

Wow, Materazzi could really be in trouble!

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However, I think asking for the World Cup to be taken from Italy is far, far too harsh as is banning them from 2010. It was one player who made one remark (do we even know if this is what he said) and punishing the rest of his teamates in a manner that harsh would be totally disproportionate.

Maybe a start would be to increase the fines they give to players. The red carded players who showed violent conduct received fines of abour £3000. Perhaps FIFA should take into account the fact that most players earn at least twice that in a single day.

Also, if players have retired or are about to retire from international football, why not ban them from playing for their club side for a while? Surely FIFA have such powers available to them if necessary.

At least for now, I'm encouraged by the efforts of anti-racist soccer organizations to even consider banning Italy and deservedly taking the World Cup from that dirty, rotten, corrupt, cheating, racist, play-acting Azzurri scum! They see what the likes of me see. Actually, I don't think deservedly revoking the title from that scum squad and banning them from play is too harsh, even though Italy is a very significant power in FIFA and generates massive revenue. A message about racism and fascism MUST be made and sent to them that racism and fascism has NO DAMN PLACE at all in soccer and anywhere else. So what if it was one (Matterazzi) player? They know better about this! Let them and their fans suffer big time!

I will also call on FIFA to forfeit all of their matches and results from the World Cup and WC qualifying as well as any accolade they did not deserve from this as a team. FIFA'a anti-racism campaign must display a lot of teeth and bits in this. What better way than this? It also must mandate very stiff fines to players. How about US$250,000? And ban them from their club for a long time, maybe at least 22 games. European nations, not just Italy, is getting more and more diverse by the day. It's more than about time those players and FICG, Serie A & B realize that too.

And don't think I'm letting Spain off the hook in this too (specifically Luis Aragones)...

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I do repeat myself:

he is/was really an excellent football player

but from yesterday night on

i hope i'll never hear again someone calling him a champion.

If Zidane isn't a champion, what is Materazzi? Let's face it, if Materazzi has said the kind of things that has been reported that he said, he is just as bad as the divers and the play-actors and those who wave imaginary cards in referees' faces.

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oh wow

I thought the one in here were criticizing Italy just 4 envy...

now i do think it's a sort of anti-italianism racism...

well...let's see how deep this can go...

btw---it's zidane the villain in this sorta thing_anything he was said, he was wrong acting like that. full stop

btw2_i never said materazzi is a champion. i don't even bother how to catalogue him. the only thing i can surely say is that a real champion, a real lord-of-sport cannot so things like that. 4example...del piero by now is a real "signore" as we say in here.

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Well, the whole racism debate is not helped by comments like this:

ROME, July 11, 2006 (AFP) - The far-right vice-president of the Italian Senate stoked anti-French feeling in the country Tuesday, branding Italy's World Cup final opponents ``blacks, Islamists and communists''.

Roberto Calderoli, head of the right-wing popular Northern League party, refused to retract earlier comments in which he hailed Italy's defeat of France in Sunday's World Cup final as ``a victory for Italian identity''.

``When I say that France's team is composed of blacks, Islamists and communists, I am saying an objective and evident thing,'' Calderoli was quoted on Tuesday as saying by the ANSA news agency.

His comment, in response to a complaint to the Senate by France's ambassador to Italy, reiterated remarks made on Sunday in the aftermath of Italy's World Cup victory.

Italy's all-white team, from a largely devout Catholic populace, had won against ``a France team which sacrificed its own identity by lining up blacks, Islamists and communists to get results,'' Calderoli had said on Sunday.

Members of France's national team, composed largely of non-white players, returned to a heroes' welcome on Monday despite their defeat by Italy in Berlin on Sunday.

France captain Zinedine Zidane gave an unexpected twist to the match when he was sent off for headbutting Marco Materazzi, after the Italian player allegedly made racist insults.

But Zidane -- the son of Algerians -- was backed by his country's politicians. ``France admires you and loves you,'' President Jacques Chirac told him on his team's return from the tournament.

France's ambassador to Italy, Yves Aubin de Messuziere, denounced Calderoli's earlier comments as ``an unacceptable and contemptible declaration, meant to foment hatred''.

But Calderoli refused to apologise.

``France is a multiethnic nation, given its colonial past, of which I would not be proud,'' he said.

``It's not my fault if certain people were puzzled to see a team which lined up seven blacks out of 11 players... and if certain players prefer Mecca to Bethlehem.''

Calderoli, former institutional reform minister in the government of ex-president Silvio Berlusconi, has made a reputation for inflammatory comments and gestures.

He resigned as minister in February after he was criticised for wearing a T-shirt lampooning the Prophet Mohammed, sparking deadly anti-Italian riots in Libya.

AFP

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oh wow

I thought the one in here were criticizing Italy just 4 envy...

now i do think it's a sort of anti-italianism racism...

well...let's see how deep this can go...

btw---it's zidane the villain in this sorta thing_anything he was said, he was wrong acting like that. full stop

btw2_i never said materazzi is a champion. i don't even bother how to catalogue him. the only thing i can surely say is that a real champion, a real lord-of-sport cannot so things like that. 4example...del piero by now is a real "signore" as we say in here.

I didn't see any racism in arwebb's post. Stop making false accusations, cesco.

And I'm not buying that bull Materazzi said. He knows perfectly well what a terrorist is. I can't believe he thinks we're that stupid.

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You people are seriously over reacting. And some are getting too emotional over this. What was said is already been said and Materazzi should be the one penalized, not the team as a whole. The reason some of you want the team penalized is due to your own dislike & biases towards the Italian team. Those articles posted by ard are very biased in my opinion and far fetched. I don't see Italy being stripped of their World Cup.

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You people are seriously over reacting. And some are getting too emotional over this. What was said is already been said and Materazzi should be the one penalized, not the team as a whole. The reason some of you want the team penalized is due to your own dislike & biases towards the Italian team. Those articles posted by ard are very biased in my opinion and far fetched. I don't see Italy being stripped of their World Cup.

I just emphasise once more: The regarding article of FIFA's disciplinary regulation says,

"In the case of matches without points, the team concerned, if identifiable, will be

disqualified."

So, it does not say, "... can be disqualified". Thus there would be no alternative for FIFA than disqualifying the Italian team -- if it's proved that Materazzi's remarks were of racist nature.

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I just emphasise once more: The regarding article of FIFA's disciplinary regulation says,

"In the case of matches without points, the team concerned, if identifiable, will be

disqualified."

So, it does not say, "... can be disqualified". Thus there would be no alternative for FIFA than disqualifying the Italian team -- if it's proved that Materazzi's remarks were of racist nature.

I still don't see it happening

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B)

Could Italy lose the World Cup?

July 11, 2006

MSNBC News Services

The door is open for FIFA to strip Italy of their 2006 World Cup title if Italian defender Marco Materazzi is found to have defamed French captain Zinedine Zidane.

In March this year the world soccer body FIFA quietly introduced new anti-racism regulations.

Article 55 of the new FIFA disciplinary regulations concludes that if a player "denigrates someone in a defamatory manner on account of race, colour, language, religion or ethnic origin" leading to the possible penalties "if any player, association or club official or spectator perpetrates any kind of discriminatory or contemptuous act as described by par. 1 and/or 2 of this article, three points will automatically be deducted from the team concerned, if identifiable, after the first offence. In the case of a second offence, six points will automatically be deducted, and for a further offence, the team will be relegated. In the case of matches without points, the team concerned, if identifiable, will be disqualified."

In the case of Sunday's World Cup Final, if FIFA find Materazzi did "denigrate Zidane in a defamatory manner" and enact Article 55, the only form of punishment available to them would be to disqualify Italy and strip them of their title.

Zidane is expected to reveal what Materazzi said to him in a French TV interview later this week and explain why he had such a reaction.

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I liked the following article _ it pretty well sums up my attitude to Zidane's actions.

By Martin Samuel

HE INSULTED his mum. His poor old mum. Mama Zidane, eyes moist with tears of pride watching her son in a World Cup final. She's not well, you know. And then this Italian, this toerag, slanders her in the vilest way imaginable. Well, of course, he flipped. Wouldn't you?

No, actually, you wouldn't. Not if this was your last game and you had a World Cup to win. Not if the team had been built around your presence and was looking to you above all others. Not with a penalty shoot-out looming. Not with damn near 20 years' professional experience to call upon, during which time no insult would have been considered too grave to be hurled in your direction. Not with your country depending on you. The most remarkable aspect of Zinedine Zidane's ignominious farewell to football is the number of people queueing up to exonerate him. The Eyeties had a pop at his old mummy. Cor blimey, guv. Stands to reason, dunnit?

In 1989, a few months after winning the title, Arsenal flew to Miami to play in what was laughably billed the unofficial world club championship, mostly by journalists angling for a good story and a week in Florida. The trip had been set up by a friend of George Graham and involved a match against Independiente, the champions of Argentina. Because neither club were king of their continent, the world domination aspect of the fixture was somewhat elusive, as was the crowd at the Joe Robbie Stadium, but the match more than made up for it, an ill-mannered tear-up, occasionally punctuated by episodes of high-tempo, high-quality football.Gus Caesar, the Arsenal defender, was banished to the stands, as was Gary Lewin, the physiotherapist, a decision that contravened all Fifa guidelines on player safety.

It was better than the official Club World Championship that year, a dull affair between AC Milan and Atletico Nacional, of Colombia, ended by a single goal after 118 minutes but concluded in understandable acrimony. Back at the hotel, the late - and, at that time, great - Arsenal winger, David Rocastle, said that the Independiente defenders knew only one English word: nigger. He thought they had learnt it especially for him.

Rocastle had a stormer that night, as Zidane will have done on many occasions when opponents attempted to disturb his focus with crude abuse. Can you imagine what a Muslim of Algerian descent from the poorest quarter of Marseilles has had to put up with throughout a career spent largely in Italy and Spain? Can you imagine what a Muslim in Madrid has dealt with since March 11, 2004?

Even in France, the multiracial nature of the team drew the attention of Jean-Marie Le Pen, the far-right National Front leader. "The coach went overboard on the proportion of players of colour," he said. Le Pen came second to President Jacques Chirac in the 2002 election. Viewed in this context, there is nothing Marco Materazzi could have said that Zidane would not have heard, in some form, before. He is not always the coolest character, as 14 career sendings-off would indicate, but it must be said that the majority have been for rash tackles or retaliation to physical provocation, not verbal. To professionals, the trash talk is part of the game. What might earn a looping right-hander in the pub is traditionally met with acceptance or, at worst, sneering contempt on the pitch.

A recent Premiership fixture brought together two former England colleagues: one striker, one defender. The forward had a good chance and missed. "I can remember when you used to score those," his opponent mocked. "Yeah," came the reply, "and your bird's getting f***ed all over England."

To the man in the street this is a different language, a different mentality. The sudden escalation from harmless ribbing to grotesque verbal violence is found in no other sober environment. And football is not alone; all sports flirt with chicanery in the quest for an edge, not least cricket, in which the Australians have turned sledging into an art form. We do not have to like it, but we would be fools not to acknowledge it and to acknowledge also that, in reacting to what Materazzi said or did, Zidane broke one of sport's golden rules: he put his feelings ahead of what was best for his team.

There was no potential positive for France in their best player butting an opponent. His country could only suffer if he was found out and if he was not, who won but Zidane? The downside of his action, we know: it may even have cost France the World Cup, considering Zidane was a certain penalty-taker. And while French football owes Zidane too much for his team-mates to be hard on him, there is not a player alive who does not understand that he let his country down.

In big matches, particularly, players are conditioned to expect anything - the worst provocation, the sneakiest tricks off the ball. A television close-up on Sunday showed France defenders hacking at the ankles of their counterparts who stood in front of the wall as Andrea Pirlo prepared to take a free kick. "If they spit in your face, you walk away," Terry Venables would tell his England players. "This is too important to put yourself first."

Not all conversation during a match stretches the boundaries of taste. There are still some good one-liners. "Walt Disney couldn't draw your face," John Kay, of Wimbledon, said to Liverpool's nasally challenged defender, Phil Thompson. The Australia fast bowler, Merv Hughes, was a legendary chirper. "Does your husband play cricket as well?" he asked Robin Smith, the England batsman. The same story has Hughes later marching down the wicket to tell Smith: "You can't f***ing bat." The next ball, Smith struck him to the boundary. "Hey, Merv," he shouted. "We make a good pair - I can't f***ing bat and you can't f***ing bowl."

The most memorable exchange at the crease concerns Eddo Brandes, the Zimbabwe tailender, and Glenn McGrath, the Australia fast bowler. "Hey, Brandes, why are you so fat?" McGrath asked. "Because every time I f*** your wife she gives me a biscuit," Brandes replied. Even the Australia slip fielders laughed, yet, some years later, when Ramnaresh Sarwan, the West Indies batsman, met a scandalous comment about Brian Lara with a taunt about McGrath's wife, the bowler went berserk. Jane McGrath had recently had cancer diagnosed and was no longer fair game.

It may be that Malika Zidane fell into the same category. Reports in France say that she was taken ill on the day of the match and admitted to hospital. While Materazzi was not to know, in the circumstances, her son would have been hugely sensitive and an offensive remark that would have been shrugged off on another day might have carried greater resonance.

Yet Materazzi denies any reference to Zidane's mother and there is no proof, beyond the contradictory evidence of lip-readers. (And if you think football is coming out of the World Cup final badly, then the speech-reading profession is in utter disarray. The various translations doing the rounds contest that Materazzi insulted Zidane's mother, sister, wife and family, plus the late coach Jean Varraud, of AS Cannes, and the Muslim religion, covering issues as wide-ranging as terrorism, prostitution, incest and sexual preference. An ugly death to all and sundry may also have been part of the deal. If true, this really was a tour de force of verbal confrontation, the vehemence of which would turn Jerry Sadowitz green, considering Materazzi only had two sentences to go at it. Alternatively, these are high times in the world of lip-reading, lads, so good luck and don't spend it all at once.)

There could be a simpler explanation, involving the decoding, not of mouth movements, but the game. Zidane was not at his best in the Olympic Stadium. He scored from the penalty spot - just - but France did not deserve the lead and soon Materazzi took it away. Pirlo was the game's best creative player by some distance, Fabio Cannavaro its best defender and the close attention of Italy's excellent back four and defensive midfield kept the shackles on Zidane in a way Brazil never could.

After a brief France flurry early in the second half, the final settled into a familiar pattern and France did not look as if they would score until Zidane's header was denied by Gianluigi Buffon after 104 minutes. By the time Zidane and Materazzi came together five minutes later, perhaps Zidane feared that hope of a happy ending was fading. It might not have been what was said but the situation that provoked his anger, effective trash talk, like good comedy, being all in the timing.

The most profound head-butt previously delivered on British television came from a character called Yosser Hughes in Alan Bleasdale's play The Black Stuff. Sacked for moonlighting, his tools fallen from the back of his lorry as the result of a high-speed chase, Hughes returns to find two chancers loading his equipment into their van. Mad with rage, he seeks any excuse to vent his fury. "Say something," he orders them. Silence. "Say something," he repeats. One man begins a hesitant explanation. "That'll do," he says. Bang.

Perhaps Zidane was in a similar place on Sunday night and in the end his anger, his indulgence, were not about what was said but what he could not bear to hear said. The best player was Italian, the best team was Italy and the cup would be heading back to Rome. The perfect adieu to the greatest footballer Europe has produced was about to slip through his fingers. No wonder he felt like putting the nut on someone.

THE TIMES, LONDON

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:lol:

ZIDANE EXCLUSIVE: 'BRING ME THE BALLS OF MATERAZZI'

By Martin Fricker

July 12, 2006

THE furious mother of Zinedine Zidane last night PRAISED her son for his

disgraceful World Cup headbutt on Marco Materazzi.

And Malika Zidane warned the Italian defender she wants his "balls chopped

off for his part in the French skipper's sending off amid claims he branded

her a "terrorist whore" in the ugly spat.

Algerian Malika, who is recovering from an illness, claimed Zidane, 34, was

simply protecting her honour when he butted Materazzi in Sunday's final.

She told friends: "I am utterly disgusted by what I have heard. I praise my

son for defending his family's honour.

"No one should be subjected to such foul insults on or off the football

pitch and I don't care if it was a World Cup Final.

"I have nothing but contempt for Materazzi and, if what he said is true,

then I want his balls on a platter.

"Our whole family is deeply saddened that Zinedine's career should end with

a red card but at least he has his honour. Some things are bigger than

football."

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You people are seriously over reacting. And some are getting too emotional over this. What was said is already been said and Materazzi should be the one penalized, not the team as a whole. The reason some of you want the team penalized is due to your own dislike & biases towards the Italian team. Those articles posted by ard are very biased in my opinion and far fetched. I don't see Italy being stripped of their World Cup.

noone knows what was really said or IF.

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I didn't see any racism in arwebb's post. Stop making false accusations, cesco.

And I'm not buying that bull Materazzi said. He knows perfectly well what a terrorist is. I can't believe he thinks we're that stupid.

it's not an accusation it's my thought

btw. why should i shut up when in here there's plenty of people HATING my country (and of course i'm touched by that) just 4 nothing? the most of you/them don't accuse a people or an act. just take us all as a whole. it would like thinking all the americans are stupid coz bush is. or all the english are rude coz prince philip is.

i can't stand anymore a mood like this.

i donnow if i'll be able to not writing again, reacting to those kind of messages. but i hope so. coz as you all can see, this should be a way to discuss, confrontate, criticize but in a growing way. most of the time in here there's only anger, bitter and envy. and i'm not overreacting.

to me it's ok a bit of patrioctism and sort of "joking" like...<oh you italians are the mum's kids> or <you english don't bother about what happens out of your borders>...but not moods like those i've seen in here.

[to the language perfectioners...]

i know i should've write "i donnow if i'll be able not to write again".

lil' mistake.

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OK, it seems we disagree with the severity of the punishment Italy should recieve (I've already stated that I think some people are going overboard with all this).

But what if FIFA were to enact Article 55 and Italy were stripped of their title?

What would happen then? Would the French get the World Cup? I'd hope not; whatever Materazzi said, Zidane's headbutt was just as ugly. If Italy were to be stripped of their world cup for one player's verbal assualt, giving the World Cup to a French team which included a player who physically assualted an oppoenent would be hugely hypocritical and would be sending out all the wrong messages.

OK, so who should get the trophy? Not Italy or France obviously. But looking beyond the finalists for a winner would be to descend into total farce. How about a replay between the losing semi-finalists: a Portugese team who happily dive and con referees into giving descsions their way versus a German team who have already had one player suspended for violent conduct. No, that will most definately not do!

It would, ultimately, be the world cup nobody won.

Of course, if you really want to send out the right message, you could always award the cup to the winner of the fair play award. Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you the 2006 World Cup Winners..........Brazil.

(I knew they'd get it somehow) :P

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