Jump to content

Fifa World Cup 2010 - South Africa


Recommended Posts

Ah, the perennial question to ahny host of a big sporting event _ what should come first bread (and housing) or circuses?

CAPE TOWN, Feb 15, 2007 (AFP) - Plans to build hundreds of thousands of new low-cost homes could fall victim to shifting budget demands in the run-up to the 2010 football World Cup, South Africa's housing minister said Thursday.

While the government has targeted the eradication of all shack dwellings by 2014, Housing Minister Lindiwe Sisulu said there was a danger that her ministry's demands for both cash and infrastructure ``could be completely wiped off the radar screen''.

Sisulu said there was a ``clear and present urgency'' to secure the finance, raw materials and land needed to rehouse the 2.4 million families currently living in informal settlements before the competition for resources becomes even more intense.

``This (low-cost housing for the poor) is a constitutional requirement of this government, so we want to make sure that ... in the next two years we can have a massive injection in housing,'' she said.

The minister said housing delivery would have to double from the current 250,000 units a year to achieve the goal of eradicating shantytowns by 2014.

A shortage of cement was only one of the obstacles, with retailers more willing to sell to private companies than the government, Sisulu said.

South Africa, with unemployment estimated as high as 40 percent and millions living in poverty, has budgeted 15 billion rand (about two billion dollars) to host the first World Cup on the African continent.

AFP

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 753
  • Created
  • Last Reply

The South African federal government has a fiscal budget that is in the black. In fact, it seems that overall budget included the overall monies needed for the 2010 World Cup, too, and it still came up with a surplus of R$11 Billion.

Link: BBC: South Africa Has First Budget Surplus

Link to post
Share on other sites
There is no shortage of money in RSA at the moment.

But, don't you think that the word "first" here is a bit of an exaggeration? Like, I'm sure that South Africa had a budget surplus before this one or else it would be in "big trouble" in this matter.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

First, who in their right mind would threaten South Africa with "nuclear dirty bombs" in 2010?

Link: BBC: World Cup 'Dirty Bomb' Threat

And, despite having confidence in South Africa to host the upcoming World Cup, Sepp Blatter is reporting that the sport is "ill" with violence.

Link: BBC: FIFA Chief Says 'Football Is Ill'

Link to post
Share on other sites

204 national men's teams will compete in the qualifying stages for South Africa 2010. Since we all know about the host team takes one spot, the other 31 are up for grabs.

Link: BBC: Record Entries For South Africa World Cup

Link to post
Share on other sites

Green group begins serious stadium challenge

By Lindsay Dentlinger

Calling the 2010 Green Point Stadium "a monstrous carbuncle" on Cape Town's skyline, an environmental lobby group has mounted the strongest challenge to the project so far - in an urgent application in the high court to halt construction.

The application by the Cape Town Environmental Protection Association (Cepa) comes two weeks after the sod-turning ceremony on the Metropolitan Golf Course to mark the official start of construction.

The Cepa, which called the new stadium "nothing less than a monstrous carbuncle that will mar the face of the renowned beauty of Cape Town", said it was taking action in the public interest.

The group is asking the court to set aside virtually every decision by either the provincial government or the city that has led to preparations for building to start this month.

The Cepa is asking the court to declare as unlawful:

# The environmental record of decision (ROD) issued by the provincial environmental department in October, which grants approval for the stadium to be built on the Green Point Common; and,

# The revised ROD by environmental MEC Tasneem Essop in January, when she dismissed appeals against the choice of site.

The group is also challenging several land use planning applications, including the rezoning of the common from a public space area to one for community use to incorporate a stadium. It wants the court to instruct the city to return the common to the state it was in prior to building preparations.

Cepa said after it earlier expressed the intention to take legal action, it had been given an undertaking by the city last week that it would not take any irreversible steps on the site in the short term.

The Cepa is headed by chairperson Arthur Wienburg, who could not be reached for comment.

Seven respondents have been cited in the application his organisation is filing, including the environment MEC, the City of Cape Town, world soccer body Fifa and the 2010 Local Organising Committee.

This is the most significant step to date by a civic group opposed to the project. All previous threats of legal action have been defused.

The city reached a compromise with the Green Point Common Association (GPCA), which until now had put up the stiffest resistance to the stadium plans, giving the association a say in the management of the urban park planned around the stadium precinct.

The Cepa, however, wants the court to set aside a decision taken by the city director of planning that authorises the digging of earthworks, deviation of bulk services and the foundations.

Central to the group's argument is that the approvals for the project have all been inconsistent with the constitution, the National Environmental Management Act, the Environmental Conservation Act, the Promotion of the Administrative Justice Act, the Land Use Planning Ordinance and the National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act.

The court will be asked to prevent the City of Cape Town from conducting any building operations until it has ruled on the validity of the approvals process, and to instruct it to reverse any land clearing, excavation or construction that may have already taken place.

The organisation said while it was in support of the event itself, the building of a new stadium would be a gross misuse of public funds.

* This article was originally published on page 4 of The Pretoria News on April 04, 2007

Pretoria News

Published on the Web by IOL on 2007-04-04 01:42:00

© Independent Online 2005. All rights reserved. IOL publishes this article in good faith but is not liable for any loss or damage caused by reliance on the information it contains.

Link to post
Share on other sites

200 000 Fans to hit Cape Town during World Cup

By Anél Powell

CAPE TOWN must "brace itself for an influx of at least 200 000 football fans" during the 2010 World Cup, says MEC for Transport and Public Works Marius Fransman - four times the number originally predicted.

But he is confident the city's transport infrastructure will cope. "Funding is on track and the World Cup transport can happen."

The visitor numbers will give an indication of how much investment is needed to upgrade transport and meet accommodation needs.

"We have to make sure the transport action plan is up and running and responds to these numbers," Denis Lillie, project director of World Cup 2010, said.

"This is an exciting prospect and also a major challenge," said Fransman. He said work had already started on several of the transport upgrade plans.

"All key projects are either on stream or the design has been completed."

These include the widening of lanes on the N1 and N2 and the extension of the Khayelitsha rail corridor by 4.5km.

He said R450 million had been allocated for the Koeberg interchange.

Janine Myburgh, president of the Cape Town Regional Chamber of Commerce and Industry, said in a separate statement that the Koeberg interchange would play an important role during 2010 as it connected the city with the Winelands, which would provide both accommodation and attractions for the football tourists.

"The increasing reliance on road transport, the poor state of public transport and the dramatic increase in car ownership combined to make the Koeberg interchange one of the most pressing problems in the city and it deserves urgent attention.

"We are glad that it is to receive priority treatment, but at the same time we are concerned about possible delays to other projects."

Fransman said other critical projects, such as the N1 bus lane, would start even if there was not yet funding for them.

Some R1.9 billion has been allocated by all three spheres of government to improve Cape Town's transport infrastructure.

The long-awaited public transport operating entity, that would allow for the integrated management of road and rail transport, has been endorsed "in principle" by national government, said Fransman.

He said the agreement between the city and province would be signed by the end of May. "We've created the institutional mechanism for cooperation to happen."

The city's transport portfolio committee meets today to discuss 2010 transport projects. Rail, as a high capacity public transport system, has been identified as a critical focus area.

The R60 million upgrade to Athlone, Heideveld and Langa stations is expected to start in August.

The visitors' survey, done by transport specialists Axios Consulting, shows that the 50 000 estimated last year was a gross underestimation of the number of people expected to be in Cape Town during the 2010 event.

Fransman said 40 000 of these visitors would be from other African countries.

During the peak period, between the eighth and 14th day of the World Cup, the city's hotels and registered accommodation facilities will have to handle an average of 125 000 overnight stays. This excludes the 10 000 media representatives expected in the city during that time and the people who will stay with friends or family.

The city will host eight games and a semi-final during the World Cup.

Lillie said the English Football Association had already indicated that it would base its team in Cape Town, a "major economic coup" for the city.

"As a department we want to give the assurance to international teams that we will be able to offer a world-class transport system in a safe environment," Fransman said.

Lillie said the official fan park in the CBD would be on the Grand Parade, while three others have been proposed for Philippi, Athlone and Bellville.

These fan parks would be built to take traffic away from the central city.

Richard Gordge, director of Axios Consulting, said national travel demands during 2010 would depend on the match schedule.

He said the study, which was done in interviews with the supporters' associations of major teams, hoteliers and airport officials and in online surveys, showed strong local support for the hosting of World Cup matches in Cape Town.

"It is sad that a small number of people who are opposed to the tournament have been hogging all the headlines in the Western Cape, even though the majority of local people want Cape Town to be a key World Cup venue," Fransman said of the latest legal challenge against the building of the stadium.

Meanwhile, the city's mayoral committee yesterday approved a recommendation to recognise the Metropolitan Road Traffic Management Co-ordinating Committee as the co-ordinating structure for road traffic management.

Published on the web by Cape Times on April 5, 2007. © Cape Times 2007. All rights rese

Link to post
Share on other sites

England team's decision to use city as base during World Cup hailed as 'coup'

Athlone, Heideveld and Langa stations is expected to begin in August.

The visitors' survey, carried out by transport specialists Axios Consulting, shows the figure of 50 000 given last year was a gross underestimation of the number of visitors expected to be in Cape Town during the 2010 event.

Fransman said 40 000 of the visitors would be from other African countries.

During the peak period, between the eighth and 14th days of the World Cup, the city's hotels and registered accommodation establishments would have to handle, on average, 125 000 overnight stays a day. These excluded the 10 000 media representatives expected in Cape Town and people who would stay with friends or relatives.

The city is to host eight games and a semi-final.

Lillie said the English Football Association had announced it was to base its team in Cape Town. This was a "major economic coup" for the city.

Fransman said: "As a department we want to give the assurance to international teams that we will be able to offer a world-class transport system in a safe environment."

Lillie said the CBD fan park would be on the Grand Parade. Three others had been proposed, for Philippi, Athlone and Bellville. These would be built to take traffic away from the central city.

More than 80% of people surveyed said they would visit a fan park.

Richard Gordge, director of Axios Consulting, said national travel demands during 2010 would depend on the match schedule.

He said the study, which entailed online surveys and interviewing the supporters' associations of major teams, hoteliers and airport officials, had found strong support in Cape Town for the city's hosting of World Cup matches.

"It is sad that a small number of people who are opposed to the tournament have been hogging all the headlines in the Western Cape (while) the majority of local people want Cape Town to be a key World Cup venue," Fransman said, referring to the court case challenging approvals granted for the stadium.

Meanwhile, the city's mayoral committee yesterday approved a recommendation to recognise the Metropolitan Road Traffic Management Co-ordinating Committee as the co-ordinating structure for road traffic management.

Published on the web by Cape Times on April 5, 2007. © Cape Times 2007. All rights reserved.

Link to post
Share on other sites
England team's decision to use city as base during World Cup hailed as 'coup'

Athlone, Heideveld and Langa stations is expected to begin in August.

The visitors' survey, carried out by transport specialists Axios Consulting, shows the figure of 50 000 given last year was a gross underestimation of the number of visitors expected to be in Cape Town during the 2010 event.

Fransman said 40 000 of the visitors would be from other African countries.

During the peak period, between the eighth and 14th days of the World Cup, the city's hotels and registered accommodation establishments would have to handle, on average, 125 000 overnight stays a day. These excluded the 10 000 media representatives expected in Cape Town and people who would stay with friends or relatives.

The city is to host eight games and a semi-final.

Lillie said the English Football Association had announced it was to base its team in Cape Town. This was a "major economic coup" for the city.

Fransman said: "As a department we want to give the assurance to international teams that we will be able to offer a world-class transport system in a safe environment."

Lillie said the CBD fan park would be on the Grand Parade. Three others had been proposed, for Philippi, Athlone and Bellville. These would be built to take traffic away from the central city.

More than 80% of people surveyed said they would visit a fan park.

Richard Gordge, director of Axios Consulting, said national travel demands during 2010 would depend on the match schedule.

He said the study, which entailed online surveys and interviewing the supporters' associations of major teams, hoteliers and airport officials, had found strong support in Cape Town for the city's hosting of World Cup matches.

"It is sad that a small number of people who are opposed to the tournament have been hogging all the headlines in the Western Cape (while) the majority of local people want Cape Town to be a key World Cup venue," Fransman said, referring to the court case challenging approvals granted for the stadium.

Meanwhile, the city's mayoral committee yesterday approved a recommendation to recognise the Metropolitan Road Traffic Management Co-ordinating Committee as the co-ordinating structure for road traffic management.

Published on the web by Cape Times on April 5, 2007. © Cape Times 2007. All rights reserved.

CT

452819138_6c59d272dc_b.jpg

452323159_2e96fa269a_b.jpg

Good memories:

U2, Metallica and 466-64,Goo Goo Dolls & Lenny Kravitz, Michael Jackson, Athleics world cup, interschool race days, cape minstrel carnivals, cycle tour.

For a crap piece of metal, it really played a vital role.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Fifa president Sepp Blatter has admitted football's governing body has contingency plans in case South Africa cannot host the World Cup in 2010. South Africa's preparations have been dogged by delays and there are fears its stadia will not be ready. Blatter told BBC One's new Inside Sport programme: "Other countries are ready to organise the World Cup", although he implied they would not be needed. Blatter cited a list of countries that could step in, including England, the United States, Mexico, Japan and Spain.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/i...als/6606725.stm

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fifa makes 2010 Cup back-up plan

Fifa president Sepp Blatter has admitted football's governing body has contingency plans in case South Africa cannot host the World Cup in 2010.

South Africa's preparations have been dogged by delays and there are fears its stadia will not be ready.

Blatter told BBC One's new Inside Sport programme: "Other countries are ready to organise the World Cup", although he implied they would not be needed.

Blatter cited a list of countries that could step in, including England.

The others he mentioned were the United States, Mexico, Japan and Spain.

"Definitely we have a possibility to go somewhere else if something happens," said Blatter.

"It was the same case in Germany. Something can happen. A natural catastrophe or whatever, a big change in society - everybody against football.

"But then for the time being the plan B is South Africa and the plan C we definitely must have a possibility to go somewhere else, but it must be a natural catastrophe."

Last year, Blatter expressed misgivings about the lack of construction and renovation work on the 10 South African stadiums that are scheduled to host games in the World Cup.

And in December South African President Thabo Mbeki rejected claims that the tournament could be held elsewhere, insisting the 2010 World Cup would be an "exceptional event".

The Football Association said they had not been involved with any plans for the tournament to move to England.

"There have been no discussions with Fifa at this stage," a spokesman told BBC Sport.

"We do believe we have some of the finest stadia and football infrastructure in the world but it's hypothetical as we understand South Africa are on course to stage the 2010 World Cup."

bbc.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

*sigh* Every few months the same speculations...

The 2010 World Cup will take place in South Africa. Why aren't the media rather speculating about Brazil's chances of becoming the host for 2014? I see much bigger problems there than in South Africa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree.. despite I posted the article I really don't care about the hypothesis of 2010 ripped away from South Africa to elsewhere.

May be a mere propaganda by Blatter to draw the attention to him and its WC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

personally i believe he was misquoted by a world press hell bent on believing their narrow version of what south africa or indeed africa is all about. its getting sader by the day, they are looking even more pitiful

Link to post
Share on other sites
personally i believe he was misquoted by a world press hell bent on believing their narrow version of what south africa or indeed africa is all about. its getting sader by the day, they are looking even more pitiful

I didn't see the interview on Monday night, and I won't get a chance to see it until the repeat showing at the weekend so I can't yet say whether Blatter explicitly said the words he is quoted as saying.

But, I don't think the BBC would be running a story like this without words of that ilk coming out of Blatter's mouth, and remember this is in the context of him appearing on a BBC programme.

If we assume that what Blatter is quoted as saying is accurate, then it is highly significant. We don't hear about back-up plans unless there are difficulties and problems which the elected host nation is seemingly having problems tackling. As much as I read the quote as being along the lines of 'We will give South Africa every possible chance', they would not be doing their jobs properly if they did not start thinking about contingency plans.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I didn't see the interview on Monday night, and I won't get a chance to see it until the repeat showing at the weekend so I can't yet say whether Blatter explicitly said the words he is quoted as saying.

But, I don't think the BBC would be running a story like this without words of that ilk coming out of Blatter's mouth, and remember this is in the context of him appearing on a BBC programme.

If we assume that what Blatter is quoted as saying is accurate, then it is highly significant. We don't hear about back-up plans unless there are difficulties and problems which the elected host nation is seemingly having problems tackling. As much as I read the quote as being along the lines of 'We will give South Africa every possible chance', they would not be doing their jobs properly if they did not start thinking about contingency plans.

If you google it, it's also reported by other sources as well, so I'd guess it's pretty accurate. I'd interpret it more as Blatter just applying the pressure a bit more on the 2010 organisers to pick up their pace.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Given that Blatter expressed concern about the pace of preparations last year, I would interpret it as being more than that.

Oh, come on -- stop the drivel. Why don't you read the BBC article again?

"Definitely we have a possibility to go somewhere else if something happens," said Blatter.

"It was the same case in Germany. Something can happen. A natural catastrophe or whatever, a big change in society - everybody against football.

First of all, Blatter stressed that FIFA obviously has contingency plans for every World Cup -- as you can see at his remark about Germany. I guess that the media just didn't care about those contingency plans in advance to previous World Cups so that we've never known so far that FIFA always has such plans at hand.

And secondly, the information someone gives in an interview also depend on the question posed before. I guess that the BBC reporter asked Blatter something like, "There has been some trouble about the construction works and the security issue in South Africa recently. Now everything is said to be on track. But are there any contingency plans if something goes wrong nevertheless?" I wouldn't suspect that Blatter made his remark about the contingency plan just to tease the South Africans, without being asked for it. He simply responded to a question, nothing more and nothing less.

I understand pretty well that the hopes are soaring high in England when there is any remark made that it could be a World Cup host in the near future. But nevertheless, we have to stay realistic. The chances that the 2010 host will be switched indeed are below 5 %, I reckon. And the chances that England would be FIFA's first choice in that highly improbable case are even smaller. Remember, Sepp Blatter mentioned four other countries capable of being a backup host.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...