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Press Conference held today for Victoria 2026. I was hoping to watch it but cannot find a stream/replay/broadcast anywhere so relying on the Inside the Games blog

 

Sadleir says Birmingham 2022 has been "an incredible success, in terms of how the people of Birmingham have absolutely embraced being part of a big sporting festival".

She lauds volunteers' role in the staging of the Games.

The CGF chief executive says that the organisation is looking forward to working with Victoria 2026.

Phillips echoes Sadleir's praise on Birmingham, and describes the welcome received as "humbling", promising similar at Victoria 2026.

He says there is still "a lot of work to do" on the regional model, but "people have great confidence that we can deliver it well".

He says the multi-village model at Birmingham 2022 has provided something for Victoria 2026 to learn from.

Weimar says performances from athletes at Birmingham 2022 have been "inspiring", and says "the surprise and diversity is exactly what we want to see in Victoria".

He praises the "Impressive performance" of organisers here, and the way the Games has been "celebrated" by the city.

Victoria 2026 has been busy over the last 10 days, and there are lessons that have been taken logistically and on the use of venues.

"We'll build not just on Birmingham, but on Gold Coast 2018 and Melbourne 2006," he insists.

The Closing Ceremony is "really important for us", and "where we really start to introduce the world to the Victoria 2026 Commonwealth Games".

Elders from first nation groups will be part of the Closing Ceremony, and Weimar looks forward to working with them in the coming years.

Weimar says Victoria 2026 is talking to "around 20 IFs" over the inclusion of additional sports, and will formulate views after the deadline on August 19 before the CGF makes the final decision at the end of September.

"Similar number" to Birmingham is expected at 19 or 20.

He wants sports with "significant participation across the Commonwealth", aims to "attract a younger audience" and "want to surprise and delight people".

Esports is "not yet" being discussed, but the team has been present at esports events over the weekend.

"We will absolutely work on making the hubs work", Weimar said.

The Organising Committee is working on transport solutions.

"We would much rather have venues packed full of people that are energised and are focused", he said.

The Opening Ceremony will be at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Weimar confirms.

"Melbourne will continue to be an important part", but the aim is to push the Games into the region.

Track cycling is not currently on the programme, but Weimar says the Organising Committee have held conversations with the UCI on potential inclusion

An important part of Victoria's approach is using the Games is promoting the interests of first nation groups, according to Weimar.

"We see these Games as an absolute platform," he says.

adleir says that women's T20 cricket has been "incredible".

The ICC full Board has been here for their first multi-sport Games, and they arew "really excited about what's happened".

Negotiations are ongoing with the ICC, with the Games "part of their journey" towards the Olympics.

Weimar says that Victoria 2026 would "love that have women's T20 cricket".

He recognises "an increasingly complex and complex global calendar".

Weimar says conversations are ongoing with other global sports in Victoria, and says it has received "really good support from other sporting codes".

 

Sadleir says she has discussed to numerous International Federations during the Games, and has been "really impressed" with the thinking.

Weimar says that Victoria 2026 will have "innovative formats of dynamic sports", while Phillips adds that formats will "showcase regional Victoria".

Weimar says the Games will be inclusive by bringing opportunities for indigenous athletes and young people to participate in sport, continuing the trend of "equal opportunity" for male and female athletes, and the "integration of the Para programme with the able-bodied programme".

Phillips acknowledges that the Commonwealth Games represents "the pinnacle of some sports".

"We want to make sure that athletes that are preparing for Commonwealth Games are given opportunities to properly prepare", and will be working with the Australian Government and the Australian Olympic Committee.

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SPECIAL ROLE FOR VICTORIAN LAWN BOWLER 

Victorian lawn bowler Barrie Lester has been given the honour of carrying out one of the key roles at the Closing Ceremony for the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.

Australia’s most prolific medallist in lawn bowls, with four separate pieces of silverware bearing his name, including a silver in Birmingham - Lester will hand over the Commonwealth Games Federation flag to Victorian Governor Linda Dessau when it’s taken down in England’s West Midland on Tuesday morning.

As part of Commonwealth Games tradition, an athlete from the host-national always hands over the flag to an athlete from the next host country before it gets passed to officials.

Lester, who turned 40 in January this year, was chosen for the honour because of his outstanding record and his links with regional Victoria, where most of the 2026 Commonwealth Games will take place.

Barry Lester (L), Carl Healey (C) and Ben Twist (R) of Team Australia celebrate during the Men's Triples medal ceremony. Barry Lester (L), Carl Healey (C) and Ben Twist (R) of Team Australia celebrate during the Men's Triples medal ceremony.

He was born at Bendigo Base Hospital across the road from what lawns bowls venue for 2026.

He has represented Australia at three Commonwealth Games – Melbourne 2006, Gold Coast 2018, Birmingham 2022 and won medals each time, bronze (2006), two silvers (2018) and another silver this time.

Lester had already left Birmingham and was on a European holiday when he received a phone call asking him to return to take part in the handover but had no hesitation.

“I was actually in Spain just having a fun time over there in the sun for a few days and then playing some golf and heading home,” he said.

“I got asked the other day ‘what does it mean to win a medal?’ And I said, ‘the colour of the medal is cosmetic.

“A medal is a symbol of the hard work and help that the other people who got you there and to be able to do this is another one of those (achievements).”

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On 7/28/2022 at 1:29 PM, BigVic said:

Victoria 2026 will begin 20 years and 2 days after the beginning of the Melbourne 2026 Commonwealth Games and 2 days after the conclusion of the Milan-Cortina Paralympic Winter Games

Really is disgraceful they are so close - just shows a complete lack of respect, and practically too you'd expect quite a few countries ot have the same broadcasters covering both.   Nowadays "host broadcasters" of such big international events don't rely on local expertise but a network of global experts who go from one event to another.   Such a short turnaround between the two events does neither event any favour - surely the calendar isn't so crowded that Victoria couldn't wait at least another week.

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Commonwealth Games 2026: Victoria has to fix stadium issues in Ballarat to emulate Birmingham

Victoria’s 2026 plans for a Ballarat athletics stadium will not be enough to recreate the electric atmosphere in Birmingham — and the state has a lot to fix before then.

World Athletics chairman Sebastian Coe said the Victoria 2026 plans for a 30,000-spectator athletics stadium at Ballarat will present “challenges” to recreate the electric atmosphere that has been experienced at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games.

Coe, who was also the chair of the London 2012 organising committee, said that while athletes have “understood intimacy” because they have competed without large 60,000 plus crowds in the aftermath of the covid pandemic, the Victoria organisers will have to consider a raft of issues, the most significant one being transportation.

 

Track and field, the flagship Games sport, will be staged in Ballarat, an hour and a half away from the major population centre of Melbourne.

Victoria 2026 have pencilled in Ballarat to host both the athletics and boxing, and have plans to expand the current Eureka stadium, which normally hosts Aussie Rules and soccer matches, from it current 11,000 capacity to 20,000 as a Games legacy, In addition they plan to add 10,000 temporary seats so that for the Games it can hold 30,000 spectators.

But front of mind for Coe is that the Alexander Stadium in Birmingham, which holds 37,000 people has been a sell out for every session including the heats, and is well connected with extensive rail links across the country, attracting supporters from well outside the city and also boasts extensive hotel accommodation.

Coe said: “There is a challenge for Victoria, and actually not dissimilar to Brisbane as well, and I speak with two hats on here, one as my experience in London and also as federation president, we do want to see full stadia.

“People from smaller communities or getting people from smaller communities into providing that sort of atmosphere is a challenge. I get the regionalisation and I get the sound issues about public finance and sustainability but the organiser in me says that will be a challenge, it won’t be insurmountable, but it’s a challenge.’’

Coe is not advocating that the athletics is shifted to the Melbourne Cricket Ground, but rather that the organisers have a fully developed and attractive plan how to move people to the regional areas to attend events.

While communities around Ballarat will be strong supporters of the track and field, it is unlikely they will buy repeat tickets to multiple sessions, and organisers will have to make it easy and attractive for people in bigger population centres to be able to get to and from Ballarat. The town, which has a population of 115,000, has several dozen hotels, but most rooms would be snapped up by teams, support staff, police and security and broadcasters.

World Athletics has just hosted its world championships in Eugene, a similar sized city to Ballarat, where finals nights were sold out, but tickets were still unsold for heat sessions - blamed on little accommodation options and transport difficulties.

In Australia there have been rumours that Coe may be approached to chair the Brisbane 2032 Olympic organising committee, but when it was put to him he was shocked by the suggestion.

“No absolutely not, it is the first time heard that, no,’’ he said.

When asked if he was interested, he replied: “ I mean honestly of all the questions I have been asked in five years, that is absolutely out of left field, no one has uttered the thought, no.”

Coe told NewsCorp Australia that the World Athletics council will consider several important issues at its next meeting in November, including whether Russia will be reinstated after satisfying conditions laid down by the anti doping Taskforce. Russian athletes have been banned because of problems with Russian doping and the testing at the laboratory since 2015, but independent observers have indicated there has been a welcome cultural shift in the way Russia views anti doping.

Coe said in respect to the Russian ban because of drugs issues: “we can see light at the end of the tunnel’’. But Russian Federation and Belarus athletes are also banned because of the war in Ukraine, and for the council to lift that ban they “would have be be satisfied that that situation is normalised enough for Ukraine athletes to be able to train and prepare themselves properly and attend a world championships unfettered”.

The International Olympic Committee is yet to make a decision about whether Russian competitors across all sports can attend the Paris 2024 Olympic Games, but with sports beginning their qualifying periods for the Games soon, it could be that the Russians can’t qualify in any case.

Space technology for 2026

Space technology has been tracking athletes for the first time at a major global sporting event at these Commonwealth Games, but is evolving so rapidly experts predict avatars will be the way of the future for all sports.

In years to come, computer-generated avatars of specific athletes – mirroring their size, speed, lung capacity and reaction to stress or fatigue – will simulate performances so the athletes themselves can tailor training programs to turn weakness into strength.

It seems some far-fetched Star Trek idea, however the genesis of this advancement has been put in place in Birmingham, where runners have been tracked by sensors on their bibs, analysed by powerful cameras to produce never-before-seen data.

The man in charge of timekeeping at the Games, chief executive of Swiss Timing, Alain Zobrist, revealed how this works.

“It’s a motion sensor and positioning system that is combined in one,” Zobrist told News Corp Australia.

“In athletics, it’s placed in the bib of the athletes.

“That was the starting point, then eventually we could use cameras with a special software, an algorithm with artificial intelligence, that could follow moving objects and recognise patterns of movement and provide information accordingly.

“We’re moving away from tags to more computer vision and artificial intelligence, and thanks to this we’re getting a much better understanding of an athlete’s entire performance, from start, during the race, and the finish.

“This is technology we’ve used for the first time in the Commonwealth Games in athletics, these sensors on the athletes.

“We’ve been working with space agencies to have a better understanding of tracking systems.

“You have regular GPS systems in your cars and phones, but space agencies use different technologies to be more accurate with the positioning of a device.

“In sport, we want to be as accurate as possible, we had conversations with space agencies as to what technologies they use and we eventually even deployed some of them with Longines in horse racing.

“The Australian Turf Club in Sydney, Randwick, is equipped with that technology. That was seven years ago, now the technology has evolved and has become smaller so we could put it in the athletes’ bibs.

“We’re going to be using sensors more and more, the advantage is that the athletes won’t have to wear these tags anymore, you point the camera and follow the performances.”

Asked to crystal ball how this technology would evolve, Zobrist said: “You can work with avatars, work in a virtual environment to provide data in competitions in totally different ways to how we know today.

“There are no limits to technologies and how as fans we will consume sports in the future.”

Avatars have already revolutionised the entertainment industry, with Swedish pop group ABBA recently performing concerts in London with the four band members depicted as they were in 1977.

The data returning from the athlete bib sensors has allowed runners to identify their weak points in certain areas of a race or in their own movement.

“What we’ve focused on the past four years is our understanding of athletes’ performances, between start and finish, so we’ve developed technologies that allow us to track their entire performance and as a consequence allows us to explain how they got to their final result,” Zobrist said.

“So we may use sensors that are on the athletes, that allow us to understand their position in the race, their instant speeds, acceleration, deceleration, cadence.

“Or we’re using computer vision and artificial intelligence to track the athletes while they compete, to extract the same information.

“That is of tremendous values, we can provide additional information to spectators on screen with TV graphics, or we can provide information to coaches and athletes.

“Some of the feedback we’ve received from athletes is that they’ve changed bits and pieces of their training program according to the data they received from our new technologies.

“It’s not one race only. With time you can eventually see patterns, and the data that you generate allows you to see tendencies of an athletes’ performance.

“This is going to revolutionise how athletes will train in the future, and how sports is perceived and followed in the future as well.”

Watch company Longines, a subsidiary of Swatch Group and official timekeepers of the Commonwealth Games, have signed an extension to ensure they remain on board for Victoria 2028, so the latest technology will be available in four years in Australia.

Founded in 1832 in Switzerland, Longines’ first time pieces were put together by farmers who couldn’t work in winter months and needed extra jobs.

It has evolved into one of the leading luxury watch brands in the world, while a Longines watch owned by Albert Einstein and auctioned in 2008 for $US596,000 now sits in Switzerland’s Bern Historical Museum.

Longines vice president of international sales, Xavier Ligero, said the company is proud to have broken technological barriers for human achievement and not destruction.

“Many industries were pushed to develop and innovate because of war, in the case of the watch industry we can really see, looking at our history, that this quest of precision and technology was really because of sport,” Ligero said.

“I really like this, to see how sport was important to us.

“We had military watches at the time related to that, but when it comes to the quest of precision and looking for these tenths of a second, hundredths of a second, it was always related to sports.”

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2 hours ago, Brekkie Boy said:

Really is disgraceful they are so close - just shows a complete lack of respect, and practically too you'd expect quite a few countries to have the same broadcasters covering both.   Nowadays "host broadcasters" of such big international events don't rely on local expertise but a network of global experts who go from one event to another.   Such a short turnaround between the two events does neither event any favour - surely the calendar isn't so crowded that Victoria couldn't wait at least another week.

I'm afraid that in Victoria the calendar is that crowded and cannot give or take one week :mellow:. Melbourne has Moomba and Ballarat its Begonia festival at the same time during early March culminating in street parades on Vic Labour Day (2nd Monday of March). They are trying to bring the 1st Term School Holidays forward to align with the Games. The AFL football season normally starts up around the third weekend of March in order for it to culminate in the finals throughout September and they are already going to ask the AFL to effectively move their whole season back two weeks. The Opening Ceremony being staged at the MCG in mid March will give the MCG curators only two weeks to recover the surface ready for the football season. Kardinia Park in Geelong will be in a similar boat with Geelong FC home games no doubt kicking off two weeks after the Comm Games finish. Mars Stadium in Ballarat is only used for AFL twice a season so its games can be delayed until very late in the season, although for the time needed to remove the athletics track and re-instate the ground as an oval, to remove the temporary stands and re-condition spectator areas, it would be fair to assume that Mars Stadium may possibly not be used at all for AFL football in 2026.

It is likely that the F1 Grand Prix will be moved back to October as it was in 2006 (meaning a likely wet Grand Prix).

Weather wise, March and April are the two most stable months in Victoria when the weather is at its best with average daytime temperatures of 22-25 degrees and it generally doesn't rain. To hold the Games in September is not achievable because the AFL Finals are still going. October and November the weather is too Spring-like and unpredictable. Victoria can still be quite wet and possibly cold into November. Also throughout October and November is Victoria's Show season (around the State) and of course the Spring Racing Carnival throughout the State where there are four consecutive weekends of the biggest metropolitan horse racing carnivals culminating in the Melbourne Cup carnival conducted over the first week of November. Mixed in there are the Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo and Werribee Cups.

Unfortunately, if the Games are staged in Victoria they have to work in with the other fixed events which also generate enormous amounts of revenue and spending. It's not about being dis-respectful, it's not Australia's fault that its season's don't align with the Northern Hemisphere. It comes down to practical timing and frankly nobody else was willing to step up and to take it on. The Games were offered to Victoria so they have to work in with Victoria's events calendar.

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3 minutes ago, RooBlu said:

I'm afraid that in Victoria the calendar is that crowded and cannot give or take one week :mellow:. Melbourne has Moomba and Ballarat its Begonia festival at the same time during early March culminating in street parades on Vic Labour Day (2nd Monday of March). They are trying to bring the 1st Term School Holidays forward to align with the Games. The AFL football season normally starts up around the third weekend of March in order for it to culminate in the finals throughout September and they are already going to ask the AFL to effectively move their whole season back two weeks. The Opening Ceremony being staged at the MCG in mid March will give the MCG curators only two weeks to recover the surface ready for the football season. Kardinia Park in Geelong will be in a similar boat with Geelong FC home games no doubt kicking off two weeks after the Comm Games finish. Mars Stadium in Ballarat is only used for AFL twice a season so its games can be delayed until very late in the season, although for the time needed to remove the athletics track and re-instate the ground as an oval, to remove the temporary stands and re-condition spectator areas, it would be fair to assume that Mars Stadium may possibly not be used at all for AFL football in 2026.

It is likely that the F1 Grand Prix will be moved back to October as it was in 2006 (meaning a likely wet Grand Prix).

Weather wise, March and April are the two most stable months in Victoria when the weather is at its best with average daytime temperatures of 22-25 degrees and it generally doesn't rain. To hold the Games in September is not achievable because the AFL Finals are still going. October and November the weather is too Spring-like and unpredictable. Victoria can still be quite wet and possibly cold into November. Also throughout October and November is Victoria's Show season (around the State) and of course the Spring Racing Carnival throughout the State where there are four consecutive weekends of the biggest metropolitan horse racing carnivals culminating in the Melbourne Cup carnival conducted over the first week of November. Mixed in there are the Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo and Werribee Cups.

Unfortunately, if the Games are staged in Victoria they have to work in with the other fixed events which also generate enormous amounts of revenue and spending. It's not about being dis-respectful, it's not Australia's fault that its season's don't align with the Northern Hemisphere. It comes down to practical timing and frankly nobody else was willing to step up and to take it on. The Games were offered to Victoria so they have to work in with Victoria's events calendar.

100% correct there. Another thing too is if you push the Games back a week, then there is a clash with Easter. Easter in Victoria also includes the Good Friday Appeal, various sporting codes (domestic leagues and also local community sport) have sporting events and tournaments over the long weekend. The Stawell Gift comes to mind as one of our major sporting events during the Easter Weekend. With the Games taking place the week before, it will carry momentum from the Games and could possibly see some International athletics stars sticking around to compete at Stawell- what a major drawcard that would be.

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Good on Lord Coe for speaking up on the folly that will be Victoria 2026

He's spot on, people from Melbourne won't travel due to distance/lack of accommodation and the population base of Ballarat is not big enough to fill the stadium day after day (especially for morning heat sessions)

Move it to Lakeside Stadium

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13 minutes ago, Victorian said:

Commonwealth Games 2026: Victoria has to fix stadium issues in Ballarat to emulate Birmingham

Victoria’s 2026 plans for a Ballarat athletics stadium will not be enough to recreate the electric atmosphere in Birmingham — and the state has a lot to fix before then.

World Athletics chairman Sebastian Coe said the Victoria 2026 plans for a 30,000-spectator athletics stadium at Ballarat will present “challenges” to recreate the electric atmosphere that has been experienced at the Birmingham Commonwealth Games.

Coe, who was also the chair of the London 2012 organising committee, said that while athletes have “understood intimacy” because they have competed without large 60,000 plus crowds in the aftermath of the covid pandemic, the Victoria organisers will have to consider a raft of issues, the most significant one being transportation.

 

Track and field, the flagship Games sport, will be staged in Ballarat, an hour and a half away from the major population centre of Melbourne.

Victoria 2026 have pencilled in Ballarat to host both the athletics and boxing, and have plans to expand the current Eureka stadium, which normally hosts Aussie Rules and soccer matches, from it current 11,000 capacity to 20,000 as a Games legacy, In addition they plan to add 10,000 temporary seats so that for the Games it can hold 30,000 spectators.

But front of mind for Coe is that the Alexander Stadium in Birmingham, which holds 37,000 people has been a sell out for every session including the heats, and is well connected with extensive rail links across the country, attracting supporters from well outside the city and also boasts extensive hotel accommodation.

Coe said: “There is a challenge for Victoria, and actually not dissimilar to Brisbane as well, and I speak with two hats on here, one as my experience in London and also as federation president, we do want to see full stadia.

“People from smaller communities or getting people from smaller communities into providing that sort of atmosphere is a challenge. I get the regionalisation and I get the sound issues about public finance and sustainability but the organiser in me says that will be a challenge, it won’t be insurmountable, but it’s a challenge.’’

Coe is not advocating that the athletics is shifted to the Melbourne Cricket Ground, but rather that the organisers have a fully developed and attractive plan how to move people to the regional areas to attend events.

While communities around Ballarat will be strong supporters of the track and field, it is unlikely they will buy repeat tickets to multiple sessions, and organisers will have to make it easy and attractive for people in bigger population centres to be able to get to and from Ballarat. The town, which has a population of 115,000, has several dozen hotels, but most rooms would be snapped up by teams, support staff, police and security and broadcasters.

World Athletics has just hosted its world championships in Eugene, a similar sized city to Ballarat, where finals nights were sold out, but tickets were still unsold for heat sessions - blamed on little accommodation options and transport difficulties.

In Australia there have been rumours that Coe may be approached to chair the Brisbane 2032 Olympic organising committee, but when it was put to him he was shocked by the suggestion.

“No absolutely not, it is the first time heard that, no,’’ he said.

When asked if he was interested, he replied: “ I mean honestly of all the questions I have been asked in five years, that is absolutely out of left field, no one has uttered the thought, no.”

Coe told NewsCorp Australia that the World Athletics council will consider several important issues at its next meeting in November, including whether Russia will be reinstated after satisfying conditions laid down by the anti doping Taskforce. Russian athletes have been banned because of problems with Russian doping and the testing at the laboratory since 2015, but independent observers have indicated there has been a welcome cultural shift in the way Russia views anti doping.

Coe said in respect to the Russian ban because of drugs issues: “we can see light at the end of the tunnel’’. But Russian Federation and Belarus athletes are also banned because of the war in Ukraine, and for the council to lift that ban they “would have be be satisfied that that situation is normalised enough for Ukraine athletes to be able to train and prepare themselves properly and attend a world championships unfettered”.

The International Olympic Committee is yet to make a decision about whether Russian competitors across all sports can attend the Paris 2024 Olympic Games, but with sports beginning their qualifying periods for the Games soon, it could be that the Russians can’t qualify in any case.

Space technology for 2026

Space technology has been tracking athletes for the first time at a major global sporting event at these Commonwealth Games, but is evolving so rapidly experts predict avatars will be the way of the future for all sports.

In years to come, computer-generated avatars of specific athletes – mirroring their size, speed, lung capacity and reaction to stress or fatigue – will simulate performances so the athletes themselves can tailor training programs to turn weakness into strength.

It seems some far-fetched Star Trek idea, however the genesis of this advancement has been put in place in Birmingham, where runners have been tracked by sensors on their bibs, analysed by powerful cameras to produce never-before-seen data.

The man in charge of timekeeping at the Games, chief executive of Swiss Timing, Alain Zobrist, revealed how this works.

“It’s a motion sensor and positioning system that is combined in one,” Zobrist told News Corp Australia.

“In athletics, it’s placed in the bib of the athletes.

“That was the starting point, then eventually we could use cameras with a special software, an algorithm with artificial intelligence, that could follow moving objects and recognise patterns of movement and provide information accordingly.

“We’re moving away from tags to more computer vision and artificial intelligence, and thanks to this we’re getting a much better understanding of an athlete’s entire performance, from start, during the race, and the finish.

“This is technology we’ve used for the first time in the Commonwealth Games in athletics, these sensors on the athletes.

“We’ve been working with space agencies to have a better understanding of tracking systems.

“You have regular GPS systems in your cars and phones, but space agencies use different technologies to be more accurate with the positioning of a device.

“In sport, we want to be as accurate as possible, we had conversations with space agencies as to what technologies they use and we eventually even deployed some of them with Longines in horse racing.

“The Australian Turf Club in Sydney, Randwick, is equipped with that technology. That was seven years ago, now the technology has evolved and has become smaller so we could put it in the athletes’ bibs.

“We’re going to be using sensors more and more, the advantage is that the athletes won’t have to wear these tags anymore, you point the camera and follow the performances.”

Asked to crystal ball how this technology would evolve, Zobrist said: “You can work with avatars, work in a virtual environment to provide data in competitions in totally different ways to how we know today.

“There are no limits to technologies and how as fans we will consume sports in the future.”

Avatars have already revolutionised the entertainment industry, with Swedish pop group ABBA recently performing concerts in London with the four band members depicted as they were in 1977.

The data returning from the athlete bib sensors has allowed runners to identify their weak points in certain areas of a race or in their own movement.

“What we’ve focused on the past four years is our understanding of athletes’ performances, between start and finish, so we’ve developed technologies that allow us to track their entire performance and as a consequence allows us to explain how they got to their final result,” Zobrist said.

“So we may use sensors that are on the athletes, that allow us to understand their position in the race, their instant speeds, acceleration, deceleration, cadence.

“Or we’re using computer vision and artificial intelligence to track the athletes while they compete, to extract the same information.

“That is of tremendous values, we can provide additional information to spectators on screen with TV graphics, or we can provide information to coaches and athletes.

“Some of the feedback we’ve received from athletes is that they’ve changed bits and pieces of their training program according to the data they received from our new technologies.

“It’s not one race only. With time you can eventually see patterns, and the data that you generate allows you to see tendencies of an athletes’ performance.

“This is going to revolutionise how athletes will train in the future, and how sports is perceived and followed in the future as well.”

Watch company Longines, a subsidiary of Swatch Group and official timekeepers of the Commonwealth Games, have signed an extension to ensure they remain on board for Victoria 2028, so the latest technology will be available in four years in Australia.

Founded in 1832 in Switzerland, Longines’ first time pieces were put together by farmers who couldn’t work in winter months and needed extra jobs.

It has evolved into one of the leading luxury watch brands in the world, while a Longines watch owned by Albert Einstein and auctioned in 2008 for $US596,000 now sits in Switzerland’s Bern Historical Museum.

Longines vice president of international sales, Xavier Ligero, said the company is proud to have broken technological barriers for human achievement and not destruction.

“Many industries were pushed to develop and innovate because of war, in the case of the watch industry we can really see, looking at our history, that this quest of precision and technology was really because of sport,” Ligero said.

“I really like this, to see how sport was important to us.

“We had military watches at the time related to that, but when it comes to the quest of precision and looking for these tenths of a second, hundredths of a second, it was always related to sports.”

The Mayor of Ballarat, the City's CEO and Mr Michael Poulton CEO of the Committee for Ballarat (It's Chamber of Commerce) have each acknowledged the issues that Baron Sebastian Coe has discussed. The Mayor of Ballarat recently discussed the planning issues that Ballarat will need to address, particularly highlighting the logistics of moving 30,000 people out of Mars Stadium at the end of a Session and that they will have to potentially do this twice a day over several days. This will definitely challenge planners.

While athletes and officials will be housed in the team village, Ballarat presently has 4,500 accommodation beds (about half of what Melbourne had during the 1956 Olympics). Ballarat has a highly developed hospitality sector as it is already a highly popular tourism destination. It's challenges will be getting enough train capacity and keeping trains moving on the rail line. After Melton the track is mainly single track with several passing sidings and potentially a train breakdown or accident could de-rail things considerably. Exactly the same applies to the Bendigo line. The State Government have invested heavily in upgrading those two lines considerably since 2002 and further works are underway. Mars Stadium will definitely need an event train platform which is pretty much non-negotiable. Further, the adjacent Midland Highway (Creswick Road) currently only has two traffic lanes North bound 2.48 km between Howitt Street out to the Western Freeway interchange. Again this is a no-brainer, it must be upgraded as a matter of priority while they are designing the upgrade of the stadium precinct.

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