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Anyone but Bach - hopefully someone with a backbone.  His comments this week passing off "human rights" as "political" are damn right disgusting.   It isn't a bi-partisan issue, it's an humanity issue and the Olympic ideals should extend to equal rights for all.

Add to that putting the rights in much of Europe behind a pay wall and the farce of handing Brisbane the 2032 games before their rival cities even knew the bidding process was open and it all adds up to one of the worst presidents in IOC history.

I'd like to think the movement moves forward with someone who puts the athletes and spectators at the forefront and doesn't allow the games to be used for sports washing by the usual suspects, but frankly I suspect they're all as bad as each other.

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37 minutes ago, Brekkie Boy said:

Anyone but Bach - hopefully someone with a backbone.  His comments this week passing off "human rights" as "political" are damn right disgusting.   It isn't a bi-partisan issue, it's an humanity issue and the Olympic ideals should extend to equal rights for all.

 

About 60% of today‘s IOC members came in during his reign. Not even most Popes can create a conclave so much along their own wishes.

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On 2/4/2022 at 3:41 PM, Brekkie Boy said:

Anyone but Bach - hopefully someone with a backbone.  His comments this week passing off "human rights" as "political" are damn right disgusting.   It isn't a bi-partisan issue, it's an humanity issue and the Olympic ideals should extend to equal rights for all.

Add to that putting the rights in much of Europe behind a pay wall and the farce of handing Brisbane the 2032 games before their rival cities even knew the bidding process was open and it all adds up to one of the worst presidents in IOC history.

I'd like to think the movement moves forward with someone who puts the athletes and spectators at the forefront and doesn't allow the games to be used for sports washing by the usual suspects, but frankly I suspect they're all as bad as each other.

Yes, I have to agree with your comments about Bach's speech at the Beijing 2022 OC.  His words made me feel physically sick.  How he could of made that speech... I just have no words.

I'd like the next IOC President to be someone with Ethics and Integrity, and help guide the IOC with those principles. 

I'd also like to see a female President for the first time.

If I could have a "fantasy" list of IOC prospective Presidents it would be:

  1.  Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal.  Thought I doubt her Royal duties would allow her to accept the role.
  2. Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki.  Thought I believe she would need to become an IOC member before her appointment.

  3. Barbara Cassani, CBE.  Thought again, I believe she would need to become an IOC member before her appointment.

  4. Baron Coe.  Who I believe is currently an IOC member so maybe the only person on my list eligible.

Of course the list is just for fun.

 

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On 2/5/2022 at 3:20 AM, StefanMUC said:

About 60% of today‘s IOC members came in during his reign. Not even most Popes can create a conclave so much along their own wishes.

Are you aware over the last 10-20 years or so that there has been an influx of new IOC members due mostly to the IOC age limit being 70?   

Yes, that’s public knowledge and all on the public record.  There have also been some members under whose membership have been terminated for disciplinary reaons over corruption investigations.

The notion that the IOC is “conclave building” is utter nonsense and once again without a shred of evidence.

Here are the IOC Age Limit Rules:

“The age limit fixed is 70 years old, except for members co-opted between 1966 and 1999, for whom the age limit is 80.”

 

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2 hours ago, Circle said:
  1. Baron Coe.  Who I believe is currently an IOC member so maybe the only person on my list eligible.

 

 

In an interview, he said he had been in contact with Peter Uberroth back in 1984 (a summer games that Coe competed in as an athlete) and is now in contact with Casey Wasserman of 2028.

You get sort of a vibe or personality of a CEO or major decisionmaker by a combination of things they do or don't do to a company, organization or operation.

The 2012 games, from Day One (when the logo of those Olympics was formally unveiled), reflected some of that. So if people were impressed by the 30th Olympiad (and that's a review that event received from various folks---I believe Coe was knighted by Queen Elizabeth for 2012), then his managing the IOC will probably reflect that.

My opinion about Coe is different, however, but I'm assuming this forum is for debate and varying viewpoints.

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Coe is a white male European only three years younger than Bach.

The IOC will try to find somehow that makes them appear as modern, forward-looking and diverse (even if they are none of those in reality), so forget about him. He also doesn't have friends in the right places anyway.

 

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5 hours ago, StefanMUC said:

He also doesn't have friends in the right places anyway.

 

He's a reminder that so-called taste and personal preferences easily overshadow the power of money and budget alone. Coe had a huge amount of dollars (or pounds) to play around with in 2012, yet I personally don't have a high regard for what he did to the 30th Olympiad.

However, I also realize that any person at the top of most organization's flow chart has to delegate a lot of tasks and responsibilities. So much of what got through the decisionmaking process in 2012 may have been in spite of, not because of, Coe.

I think half the battle with any Olympic organizing committee is for its top people to know when something is great, good, so-so, weak or really bad. Or where such people know where to draw the line.

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Coe is certainly the safe, boring, choice.   No doubt he did a great job with London 2012 but I wouldn't call him an outstanding success heading up the IAAF (or whatever it calls itself nowadays).   I don't think I've ever known World Athletics to be in worse shape really.   The Diamond League really wasn't the saviour of the sport it made itself out to be - a bloated top tier tournament full of events which were far from top tier and pretty much saw the secondary tier, so important as a feeder series for the generation of athletes not quite at the very top, struggle to co-exist alongside it compared to when it was the Golden League where you had the 6-7 flagship events but a decent series of events complementing them.     Anyhow, that was launched before his watch to be fair but I think the consequences are being felt under his tenure.

 

What I do hope is that whoever the candidate is the realise the importance of the Olympics being such a special event because it only happens every 4 years and don't get any smart ideas like the idiots over at FIFA about making it every 2 years, especially if that is the direction the World Cup takes.

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You all may have some expectations, but can you handle the reality we might have to contend with?

https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1119518/samaranch-ioc-vice-president-return

Quote

Samaranch thanks IOC members for trust on return to Executive Board

  • By Michael Pavitt at the Main Press Centre in Beijing
  •   Saturday, 19 February 2022
 
 

Juan Antonio Samaranch will return as an IOC vice-president in May ©Getty Images

Juan Antonio Samaranch has thanked International Olympic Committee (IOC) members for their trust after being elected as a vice-president for the second time.

The Spanish official was the sole candidate for the vice-president position, due to be vacated by China’s Yu Zaiqing.

A total of 72 votes were cast in favour of Samaranch becoming the organisation’s fourth vice-president during the IOC Session today.

Four votes were cast against the 62-year-old, with a further seven abstentions.

"I thank you from the bottom of my heart for this show of support, for this show of trust," said Samaranch.

"You can't imagine how happy I am.

"How happy I am to continue working with you all, now from the Executive Board."

Samaranch had previously been a member of the IOC Executive Board from 2012 to 2016, before serving one term as vice-president until 2020.

He left the Executive Board in 2020 after serving the maximum two consecutive four-year terms.

Samaranch’s return will officially come on May 22, when the truncated 139th IOC Session concludes after being split into three different parts.

Samaranch will succeed Yu, who has served as an IOC vice-president since 2014 but is required to step down after serving two successive terms.

The financial analyst, a founding partner and executive director of GBS Finanzas, joined the IOC in 2001.

He has served as the chair of the Beijing 2022 Coordination Commission, which has overseen preparations for the 2022 Winter Olympic Games in the Chinese capital.

Samaranch is also chairman of the Board of Directors of Olympic Channel Services in Spain.

Juan Antonio Samaranch has been touted as a potential contender for the IOC Presidency in the future ©Getty Images Juan Antonio Samaranch has been touted as a potential contender for the IOC Presidency in the future ©Getty Images

His return to the IOC Executive Board could leave Samaranch well-placed to launch a bid for the IOC Presidency, when incumbent Thomas Bach's term ends in 2025.

He last year suggested he could be tempted to stand in the election.

Samaranch's father, of the same name, served as IOC President between 1980 and 2001.

He will join Singapore’s Ng Ser Miang, Australia’s John Coates and Aruba’s Nicole Hoevertsz as IOC vice-presidents in March.

Hoevertsz, who saw her IOC membership extended today, has also been touted as a potential IOC Presidential candidate in the future.

Samaranch told the Spanish news agency EFE that the IOC needed to conclude the hosting of the Winter Olympics successfully, before tackling several issues.

He reportedly identified good organisation of the next Olympic Games, the role of athletes and "interference of politics in sport" among the key issues, as well as the income model and Olympic values within society.

Samaranch has been supportive of a potential Pyrenees-Barcelona bid for the 2030 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The process has been spearheaded by Spanish Olympic Committee (COE) President Alejandro Blanco.

Blanco last week met with the Olympic Committee of Bosnia and Herzegovina President Marijan Kvesić to seek further cooperation and potentially collaborating on the 2030 bid.

Blanco met with Javier Lambán, President of the Government of Aragon, to discuss the candidacy on Thursday (February 17).

Quote

His return to the IOC Executive Board could leave Samaranch well-placed to launch a bid for the IOC Presidency, when incumbent Thomas Bach's term ends in 2025.

He last year suggested he could be tempted to stand in the election.

Samaranch's father, of the same name, served as IOC President between 1980 and 2001.

He will join Singapore’s Ng Ser Miang, Australia’s John Coates and Aruba’s Nicole Hoevertsz as IOC vice-presidents in March.

So, what´s gonna be? Barcelona 2030 or 2036?

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