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Brisbane 2032


AustralianFan
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11 minutes ago, Victorian said:

Can we please stop the arguing childish behaviour. Brisbane have won the 2032 games and will be put on a brilliant and memorable games. There is no point whinging about it- It will not change anything. Let's all embrace the terrific Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic games!

Considering the primary focus of this forum is to discuss Olympic bids, debating Brisbane’s influence on future bids is more than valid. Of course it’s going to be discussed here. Cheer-squadding’s also fine, but that can’t be used as an excuse to forbid critique. 

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8 hours ago, Victorian said:

Can we please stop the arguing childish behaviour. Brisbane have won the 2032 games and will be put on a brilliant and memorable games. There is no point whinging about it- It will not change anything. Let's all embrace the terrific Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic games!

Well in 2009 and 2013 years ahead someone in Laussane thought Rio and Tokyo were going to be terrific host in their years (and with good reliable arguments) and those thoughts aged terrific. We don't know how the world will be in 10 years

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8 hours ago, Sir Rols said:

Considering the primary focus of this forum is to discuss Olympic bids, debating Brisbane’s influence on future bids is more than valid. Of course it’s going to be discussed here. Cheer-squadding’s also fine, but that can’t be used as an excuse to forbid critique. 

Exactly - I don't see how stating facts & challenging the excessive IOC PR hyperbole is "arguing childish behavior", simply because most of us aren't venerating what's coming out of Lausanne.

If those posters only want the "feel good" stuff (like the IOC does), then they should start their OWN blogs, & leave GB's for what it was meant for, & that is to debate, share different POV's, & yes, even critique (as every Olympic host gets their fair share of no matter what). 

What I do find interesting, though, is how those posters in particular, share that same sacred, holier-than-thou reverence about 2032, & the same incessant retweet habits. 

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Australia’s Long Pedigree in Staging Highly Successful World Sporting Events

With Australia’s long pedigree in organising and staging highly successful world sporting events over many decades, there is absolutely no doubt in my mind, nor should there be in anyone else’s mind, that the Olympic and Paralympic Games of Brisbane 2032 will once again be a stunning success and a warm and memorable experience for athletes, officials and spectators.

We’re sports-mad and we know how to welcome the world with mega-events which are meticulously planned and delivered while having a party with our arms around visitors at the same time.

So have no fear, we’ve got this.

We always have.

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1 hour ago, AustralianFan said:

Australia’s Long Pedigree in Staging Highly Successful World Sporting Events

With Australia’s long pedigree in organising and staging highly successful world sporting events over many decades, there is absolutely no doubt in my mind, nor should there be in anyone else’s mind, that the Olympic and Paralympic Games of Brisbane 2032 will once again be a stunning success and a warm and memorable experience for athletes, officials and spectators.

We’re sports-mad and we know how to welcome the world with mega-events which are meticulously planned and delivered while having a party with our arms around visitors at the same time.

So have no fear, we’ve got this.

We always have.

  • 1938 British Empire Games
  • 1956 Olympic Games
  • 1962 Commonwealth Games
  • 1982 Commonwealth Games
  • 1986 World 12-metre Sailing Championships
  • 1987 Americas Cup
  • 1990 World Rowing Championships
  • 1991 FINA World Swimming Championships
  • 1992 Cricket World Cup
  • 1994 Men’s Hockey World Cup
  • 1994 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships
  • 1998 FINA World Swimming Championships
  • 1998 Trampoline World Championships
  • 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games
  • 2002 Womens Hockey World Cup
  • 2003 Rugby World Cup
  • 2005 World Artistic Gymnastics Championships
  • 2006 Commonwealth Games
  • 2008 Rugby League World Cup
  • 2009 World Triathlon Series
  • 2010 World Cycling Championships
  • 2011 World Sailing Championships
  • 2015 Cricket World Cup
  • 2018 World Triathlon Series
  • 2018 Commonwealth Games
  • 2018 Rugby League World Cup
  • 2022 FIBA Womens Basketball World Cup
  • 2022 Mens T20 World Cup
  • 2022 UCI World Road Cycling Championships
  • 2023 FIFA Womens World Cup
  • 2025 World Rowing Championships
  • 2026 Commonwealth Games
  • 2027 Rugby World Cup - Mens - preferred host
  • 2027 Netball World Cup
  • 2028 President Golf Cup
  • 2029 Rugby World Cup - Womens - preferred host
  • 1905+ Australian Open Grand Slam Tennis
  • 1985+ Formula 1 World Championship
  • World Surf League
  • 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games
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1 hour ago, FYI said:

Exactly - I don't see how stating facts & challenging the excessive IOC PR hyperbole is "arguing childish behavior", simply because most of us aren't venerating what's coming out of Lausanne.

If those posters only want the "feel good" stuff (like the IOC does), then they should start their OWN blogs, & leave GB's for what it was meant for, & that is to debate, share different POV's, & yes, even critique (as every Olympic host gets their fair share of no matter what). 

What I do find interesting, though, is how those posters in particular, share that same sacred, holier-than-thou reverence about 2032, & the same incessant retweet habits. 

How is sharing news and updates about the games incessant? 

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4 hours ago, Chris_Mex said:

Well in 2009 and 2013 years ahead someone in Laussane thought Rio and Tokyo were going to be terrific host in their years (and with good reliable arguments) and those thoughts aged terrific. We don't know how the world will be in 10 years

Tokyo was a terrific host under the circumstances.

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21 minutes ago, ulu said:

Tokyo was a terrific host under the circumstances.

I respect tokyo for hosting the games during the pandemic, but luck also plays a big factor in determining the success of an event. And definitely a games in whithout any single spectator on state of the art purposely built venues, uncomfortable pandemic protocols and with forgettable ceremonies can't be considered terrific, pandemic or not. And letting the event itself aside, spending 15k million in an event which generated no revenue from ticketing or from tourism income is the definition of an unsuccesfull event. I firmly believe tokyo deserved better, and they should be given the chance to host in 2040 at least, but reality is what it is and the tokyo 2020 games failed as an event

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IOC President Thomas Bach, Kirsty Coventry, Chair of IOC Brisbane 2032 Coordination Commission, Qyeensland Premier Anastacia Palaszczuk  and Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner adress the media today in Brisbane.

 

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On 5/3/2022 at 9:01 PM, AustralianFan said:

Perhaps, wrong choice of words.

By “allowing it” I mean that such things as:

- mandatory minimum venue capacities    have been done away with,

- the shift to using existing venues even if they are smaller has occurred with New Norm,

- new venues are actively discouraged unless a legacy use after the games can be demonstrated

- Brisbane are using community sport centres as Olympic venues in 2032

- the main athletics and ceremonies stadium is only 50,000 capacity- one of the smallest in recent decades

All this from “smaller Brisbane” will, in time,  encourage more bids from other smaller cities and regions around the world, especially once the world sees the anticipated highly successful Brisbane 2032 in 10 years time.

For me the concern is that they've reduced the requirements before figuring out how to manage the reductions. This is like planning a budget with reduced rent expense before you've actually found a cheaper apartment. It's not bad; I very much want it to happen and think it is a change for the better. But how exactly will it work?

If the games have reduced seating capacity, who will lose out on those seats? Will fans no longer be allowed to attend in person? Will the IOC stop providing sponsors, media, etc with seats? Will volunteers and athletes no longer get to attend events? This same issue arises with reduced numbers of hotels.

Edited by Nacre
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5 hours ago, Nacre said:

For me the concern is that they've reduced the requirements before figuring out how to manage the reductions. This is like planning a budget with reduced rent expense before you've actually found a cheaper apartment. It's not bad; I very much want it to happen and think it is a change for the better. But how exactly will it work?

If the games have reduced seating capacity, who will lose out on those seats? Will fans no longer be allowed to attend in person? Will the IOC stop providing sponsors, media, etc with seats? Will volunteers and athletes no longer get to attend events? This same issue arises with reduced numbers of hotels.

The IOC have not reduced venue capacities, they have removed  minimum required venue capacities to balance with that venue’s ongoing legacy need of the community in which it is located if it is a permanent venue.

This is to avoid the previous IOC-mandated minimum capacity venues which resulted in rotting white elephants after the Games.

It’s all about balancing the needs of the Games with the legacy needs of that venue after the Games.

It’s no longer the IOC putting demands on Host cities and saying “it’s all about me” - those days are gone.

The 2032 Olympic Stadium is a prime example of this with it’s capacity of 50,000.

Yes, it’s one of the smallest Olympic Stadium capacities in recent memory but it meets the legacy requirements of the Brisbane market for winter crowds (AFL Football) or summer (cricket).  It will still jump out of it’s skin like any non-Covid Ceremony and Athletics venue and this packed stadium will look great on television. 

They will not do away with sponsor, media or spectator comforts at venues.

Volunteers and Athletes will still get to attend events. That will not change.

There is no “reduction of hotels”.  For 2032, South East Queensland already an international tourist gateway and mecca, has more than enough rooms to host the Games tomorrow.  Come Games time in 10 years, room numbers will further be supercharged.

As far as 2032 venue capacities, here they are and including the **community sports centres to be used as Olympic venues.

Brisbane Olympic Venues

  • The Gabba (rebuild, 50,000 capacity) – Athletics, Ceremonies
  • Brisbane Arena (new, 15,000) – Swimming, Water Polo
  • Brisbane Aquatic Centre (existing, 4,300) – Diving, Artistic Swimming, Water Polo
  • South Bank Culture Forecourt (temporary, 4,000) – Archery
  • **Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre (new, 12,000) – Basketball
  • South Bank Piazza (existing, 4,500) – 3x3 Basketball
  • Anna Meares Velodrome (existing, 5,000) – Track Cycling, BMX racing
  • Victoria Park (temporary, 5,000/25,000) – Freestyle BMX, Cross Country Equestrian
  • Brisbane Showgrounds (existing, 15,000) – Equestrian
  • Suncorp Stadium (existing, 52,500) – Rugby Sevens, Football (Finals)
  • **Chandler Indoor Sports Centre (rebuild, 10,000) – Gymnastics
  • Ballymore Stadium (upgrade, 10,000) – Hockey
  • Brisbane International Shooting Centre (existing, 2,000) – Shooting
  • Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre (existing, 6,500) – Table Tennis, Fencing, Taekwondo, Badminton
  • Redland Whitewater Centre (new, 8,000) – Slalom Canoe
  • Brisbane Entertainment Centre (existing, 11,000) – Handball
  • **Moreton Bay Indoor Sports Centre (new, 7,000) – Boxing
  • Ipswich Stadium (under construction, 10,000) – Modern pentathlon
  • Lake Wyaralong (existing, 14,000) – Rowing, Sprint Canoe
  • Royal Queensland Golf Club (existing, 15,000) – Golf
  • Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron (existing, 10,000) – Sailing
  • Queensland Tennis Centre (existing, 6,000) – Tennis

Gold Coast Venues

  • Broadbeach Park Stadium (temporary, 12,000) – Beach Volleyball
  • Cbus Super Stadium, Gold Coast (existing, 27,400) – Football (Preliminaries)
  • **Gold Coast Sports and Leisure Centre (existing, 7,500) – Judo, Wrestling
  • Broadwater Parklands (temporary 5,000) – Triathlon, Marathon Swim
  • **Coomera Indoor Sports Centre (existing, 11,000) – Volleyball
  • Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre (existing, 6,000) – Weightlifting, Volleyball

Sunshine Coast Venues

  • Sunshine Coast Stadium (upgrade, 16,500) – Football (Preliminaries)
  • **Sunshine Coast Indoor Sports Centre (new, 6,000) – Basketball (Preliminaries)
  • Alexandra Headland (temporary, 5,000) – Road Cycling, Race Walking, Kiteboarding, Keelboat Sailing
  • Sunshine Coast Mountain Bike Park (existing, 10,000) – Mountain Biking

Credit: Brisbane 2032 Olympic venues announced - 23 July 2021 - Austadiums.com

 

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

The IOC have not reduced venue capacities, they have removed  minimum required venue capacities to balance with that venue’s ongoing legacy need of the community in which it is located if it is a permanent venue.

The effect is the same, whatever the semantics.

If the minimum capacity of a venue used to be X seats and the IOC allows X-5,000 seats, then there are 5,000 fewer seats available. So 5,000 fewer people will be able to attend that would have normally attended. What I am asking is who those 5,000 people will be. Will the IOC cut the seating allocated to sponsors, or athletes, of the media, or volunteers, or fans?

There are ways to make this work. They can get the media to cover the games remotely. They can simply cut the perks for athletes, sponsors and volunteers. And they can sell less tickets to fans. But if the IOC is going to accept smaller venues, then they ARE going to have to make cuts.

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1 hour ago, Nacre said:

The effect is the same, whatever the semantics.

If the minimum capacity of a venue used to be X seats and the IOC allows X-5,000 seats, then there are 5,000 fewer seats available. So 5,000 fewer people will be able to attend that would have normally attended. What I am asking is who those 5,000 people will be. Will the IOC cut the seating allocated to sponsors, or athletes, of the media, or volunteers, or fans?

There are ways to make this work. They can get the media to cover the games remotely. They can simply cut the perks for athletes, sponsors and volunteers. And they can sell less tickets to fans. But if the IOC is going to accept smaller venues, then they ARE going to have to make cuts.

 I really don’t know what your fear is. 

Olympic venues always have, and always, will proportional (%) seating allocations.

Regardless of the capacity of an Olympic venue, a certain proportion will always be allocated to various groups of stakeholders: IOC, Olympic family, media, sponsors, spectators.

This has been the case for eons and is not changing.


 

 

 

 

 

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