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33 minutes ago, yoshi said:

The Seine looks quite wide in those pictures, I'd imagined it as being much narrower than the Thames? Like I say I like the idea, and if anyone can make a huge spectacle like this happen, it's France - but is "close to spectators, close to each other" really possible on a river?

Yes it is quite wide and to keep athlete teams connected with the spectators, barge/boat captains are going to have to be closer to one side or the other of the banks of the Seine River.  Steering a central course down the middle of the river is going to create a distance disconnection between athlete teams and spectators which is too large.  

Musicians, performers, speakers and other entertainment can be dispersed throughout the fleet on the river and it’s banks and bridges.

 

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Silly AF Fan, since when did drawings really give you a feel of how things will move along?  :D  :lol: You can keep publishing those renderings 10,000x -- doesn't make the situation with 900 variables any more viable to me.  When they've run an actual simulation and shared REAL results, only then will I believe this is a viable plan.  

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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1 hour ago, BigVic said:

A dud on the Yarra yesterday  

How are they going to do the Parade of athletes. Have a hybrid ceremony. Artistic elements on the Siene then the main, formal ceremony at the Stade De France 

I agree the AFL Parade on the Yarra was a dud, and only 3 barges which were too far away from the river banks.

For Paris 2024, they have announced that the parade of athletes barges and boats will happen on the Seine River then getting off The Trocadero where the main protocols of the Ceremony will take place.

 

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As different as Paris is, there were definitely lessons from yesterdays very limp parade yesterday in Melbourne. There is no guarantee a river parade will be a success, it will be difficult to keep to a strict time line, there will be all sorts of time consuming logistics (like unloading boats), the action will be a distance away from spectators etc....

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21 hours ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

As different as Paris is, there were definitely lessons from yesterdays very limp parade yesterday in Melbourne. There is no guarantee a river parade will be a success, it will be difficult to keep to a strict time line, there will be all sorts of time consuming logistics (like unloading boats), the action will be a distance away from spectators etc....

Absolutely.

Also lessons to be learned from other river parades, such as the 2012 Diamond Jubilee Parade on a wide river but also the annual highly successful Canal Parade - Pride Amsterdam, who are experts at this massive year after year to to packed canal banks, streets and bridges.

I went to the 2005 Canal Pride Parade and the place was jumping, many barges and boats, performers, particpants, community workers, volunteers, pumping music, lights, thousands and thosands of spectators.

Amsterdam's Pride canal parade draws huge crowds on return after two years - Reuters News

This past August, 80 boats/barges participated in the 2022 Amsterdam for Canal Pride Parade (NL Times)  in a trimphant return after two years of Covid restrictions and lockdowns.

VcxZOIR.jpg

Although the Seine River is wider than the canals of Amsterdam, the Paris 2024 organisers I’m sure will be looking to how and why the Canal Pride Parade is such a smashing success year after year.

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57 minutes ago, SportLightning said:

This will be different, since the river parade will be used for the parade of nations with athletes arriving.

It’s the same in that all the athletes will still all be on boats and barges at Paris 2024, just as participants were in past river and canal parades.

Lessons need to be learned from those parades which were flops and which ones which are a raging success.  

Why is the Amsterdam Canal Pride Parade parade such a huge success every year?

It’s because:

  • everyone is happy - not sullen, solemen and still, like they are at a funeral,  as it was for the players this week in the disastrous, spaced-out AFL Grand Final River Parade,
  • in the Amsterdam Pride Canal Parade barges are close to spectators and connected with their audience
  • the whole atmosphere is happy, energetic, joyous, celebratory, musical, visual, colourful and loud!
  • boats and barges are close together (mostly) to make it an actual parade, and not a catwalk (one at a time).

Paris 2024 no doubt will take all this into account in the most radical imagining of an Olympic Opening Ceremony in history along 6kms along the Seine and at The Trocadero.

 

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4 hours ago, SportLightning said:

This will be different, since the river parade will be used for the parade of nations with athletes arriving.

 

3 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

It’s the same in that all the athletes will still all be on boats and barges at Paris 2024, just as participants were in past river and canal parades.

Lessons need to be learned from those parades which were flops and which ones which are a raging success.  

Why is the Amsterdam Canal Pride Parade parade such a huge success every year?

It’s because:

  • everyone is happy - not sullen, solemen and still, like they are at a funeral,  as it was for the players this week in the disastrous, spaced-out AFL Grand Final River Parade,
  • in the Amsterdam Pride Canal Parade barges are close to spectators and connected with their audience
  • the whole atmosphere is happy, energetic, joyous, celebratory, musical, visual, colourful and loud!
  • boats and barges are close together (mostly) to make it an actual parade, and not a catwalk (one at a time).

 

Paris 2024 no doubt will take all this into account in the most radical imagining of an Olympic Opening Ceremony in history along 6kms along the Seine and at The Trocadero

…. at least we hope they do.

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1 minute ago, fusilli said:

^^too big to flop? B)

 

No event is too big to fail.

But the organisers are not going into this with their eyes closed.  They have a vision and are now working through a plan to bring that to life.  None of us here behind our keyboards knows if it will be a success, or not, and kick off the Paris 2024 Olympics in the most extraordinary way.    I persinally think the French can pull it off and make history.

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The more i think about it, one of the most difficult things to manage will be timing. Flawless timing is essential for a great ceremony....... You cant just have everything come to a stop for ten minutes while athletes get out of barges, or wander up to take their seats etc.....Then you have tides and currents, maneuvering ships like clockwork etc...

I dont think the ceremony will 'fail' no matter what they do, but there is a lot of risk to seamless show in this approach.

 

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8 hours ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

The more i think about it, one of the most difficult things to manage will be timing. Flawless timing is essential for a great ceremony....... You cant just have everything come to a stop for ten minutes while athletes get out of barges, or wander up to take their seats etc.....Then you have tides and currents, maneuvering ships like clockwork etc...

I dont think the ceremony will 'fail' no matter what they do, but there is a lot of risk to seamless show in this approach.

 

It's a lot more than that.  They're going to try and cram, what? 12,500? 13,000 people in a weird space that wasn't built to hold even half that number; and they have to carry it off to a certain timetable, etc. etc.  I wouldn't want ot be among the first 30 teams (AFGHAN to maybe IRAN) because you will be standing there for 2 to 3 hours.  It's not like they have another stadium nearby as the "holding tank" for all the athletes already assembled there and enjoying the show before it's their turn to march out.  As a matter of fact, most of the athletes who choose to participate and march, will MISS MOST OF THE SHOW because they will be on display on the barges which probably won't have WiFi and/or giant screens.  So, good luck for Athletes' "enjoyment" of the event.  

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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4 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

It's a lot more than that.  They're going to try and cram, what? 12,500? 13,000 people in a weird space that wasn't built to hold even half that number; and they have to carry it off to a certain timetable, etc. etc.  I wouldn't want ot be among the first 30 teams (AFGHAN to maybe IRAN) because you will be standing there for 2 to 3 hours.  It's not like they have another stadium nearby as the "holding tank" for all the athletes already assembled there and enjoying the show before it's their turn to march out.  As a matter of fact, most of the athletes who choose to participate and march, will MISS MOST OF THE SHOW because they will be on display on the barges which probably won't have WiFi and/or giant screens.  So, good luck for Athletes' "enjoyment" of the event.  

There will not be a “2 or 3 hour” wait for the first few teams who arrive

… and, yes, all athletes will get to the Trocacero and all be there as planned to see the Ceremony segments they are meant to be there for.  

The Departure Point at Pont d’Austerlitz for the river parade of nations has multiple mooring positions on both sides of the Seine for several teams of athletes to simultaneously board their  boats and barges at the same time. 

Remember also, this very different River Parade of Nations will also not be single file, one at a time slow walking, like it usually is around a stadium.

As all the concept images have shown, multiple teams’ boats and barges will be sailing together down the Seine River.   Boat and barge captains, in constant radio contact, will likely have strict instructions on their course and their relative positions on the Seine. 

The concept image below shows what is likely planned with multiple mooring positions for athletes’ boats and barges - that’s common sense and logical for such a big, time-sensitive exercise as this.

6UKZ6Fw.jpg

The Arrival Point at Pont Diena near the Trocadero also has multiple mooring positions to accommodate simultaneous disembarkation of teams from several boats and barges.

So yes, the Parade of Nations is always long, but just because they’re on a boat this time does not me will not be any near as long as you think.

The boats and barges will also not likely to be going at “walking pace” along the river and you would think a steady pace will be kept - but not too fast so as to maintain connection with the crowds in the spectator areas on the banks

For instance:

  • at an average 10kmh boat speed will take around 30 minutes to travel the 6kms parade route,
  • @ 5kmh, will take around just over an hour to get to the Arrival Point.

The final “steady pace” of the boats will be determined by the organisers and likely well within the limits of the local river speed regulations:

“The maximum speed allowed on the River Seine is 18km per hour as long as the boat is more than 20 metres away from the river banks and weighs less than 20 tonnes. If not, the speed limit is 12 km per hour”

I’m guessing around 8 kmh might be a good parade pace (?)

But whatever it is, the timing and every other detail of this whole unique ‘Olympic Seine’ Opening Ceremony will be planned and rehearsed within an inch of it’s life, just as movement of athlete teams into the Parade of Nations positions is done at every Olympic Games Opening Ceremony.   

The entire world will be glued to this unique Opening Ceremony as Paris welcomes back the Olympic Games exactly 100 Years since Paris 1924.

I think this Opening Ceremony will be an organisational, logistical and creative triumph for the French.

 

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Uh-huh.  And have they figured out how they are going to turn the 140+ boats and barges around, and have them ready to take the 8,000+ (or, even if say 2,000 will be returned in buses), so 6,000 bodies back to Point d'Austerlitz via those motley craft?  Where will the vessels wait?  Can you have over 100 boats and barges there waiting to pick up the athletes again? Can the bodies now board on portside
Disembarking on the opposite side? :blink:  So, those athletes will have a longer walk to Trockadero; and then integrating them into the right marching order? :wacko:
Why are they putting themselves thru this LOGISTICAL NIGHTMARE, when it would be so much easier over at the Stade de France?  They will have the new Aquatics center there as the "holding tank" arena. 
This whole thing may look easy on paper, but I'll be my beret and baguette, this will be Dunkirque 2.

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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Also, with boats full of people rubbing up against each other, you will also NOW have to deal with 8,000+ life jackets . . .  which all the boat-riders and crews will have to put on; and then remove when they disembark at Point d'Austerlitz' and then ALL THOSE life-jackets have to be ready to be worn again on the trip back?  So they would have to hire a few hundred additional life-jacket coordinators at many points just to collect, marshall and organize the friggin' life jackets before the athletes move out and get ready for the parade -- and then give them out again at the end?  :blink:
Have they figured that out yet -- when NO SUCH ADDITIONAL LOGISTICAL item is needed if the whole thing was staged at Stade de France??  :wacko:

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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I wonder how much additional insurance Paris 2024 will now have to carry for this extremely foolhardy venture? Or will they have the athletes sign NON-LITIGATION contracts before they board the boats, should anything happen?   And if they refuse to sign? :blink:

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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How many bomb teams and dogs will they have inspecting the 100+ barges the day before--top to bottom?  And how do you NOT prevent underwater attachment of explosives even after the boats have passed "inspection"?  And even when they have turned around and are waiting to take the athletes back to the OV?  With this idiotic arrangement, non c'est possible.  Quelle stupide!!

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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