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A Tokyo 2020 cancellation could derail 2032 Olympic bids


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Amid unconfirmed reports that the Japanese government secretly considers the opening of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics in July unlikely, regions lining up to host the 2032 edition are paying attention. The Games originally scheduled to be held last summer were postponed exactly one year due to the Coronavirus pandemic. But with new cases surging in […]

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okay but like what about 2022? I know these are different times, but the Winter Games and Summer Games have been held in the same year for a while. I get the digital age is much different, but like why isn't that thrown on the table?

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1 hour ago, Anthony said:

okay but like what about 2022? I know these are different times, but the Winter Games and Summer Games have been held in the same year for a while. I get the digital age is much different, but like why isn't that thrown on the table?

Because Japan is spending like $3 billion for this postponement.  Aside from what it would cost to postpone another year, would all their venues be available in 2022?  What about the calendars of all the sports federations like World Athletics which pushed its 2021 world championships back to 2022?  And what about all the sponsorship and marketing deals that would be affected if the Beijing Olympics occur before Tokyo?

There's a reason the Winter and Summer Olympics are no longer held in the same year.  Yes, we're dealing with extreme circumstances.  It's not so easy to say "but like what about 2022" and think that's a simple solution.  Postponing to this year was hard enough.  Another year might be more trouble than its worth, even if the likelihood of a more open Olympics is higher a year later.

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6 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

Because Japan is spending like $3 billion for this postponement.  Aside from what it would cost to postpone another year, would all their venues be available in 2022?  What about the calendars of all the sports federations like World Athletics which pushed its 2021 world championships back to 2022?  And what about all the sponsorship and marketing deals that would be affected if the Beijing Olympics occur before Tokyo?

There's a reason the Winter and Summer Olympics are no longer held in the same year.  Yes, we're dealing with extreme circumstances.  It's not so easy to say "but like what about 2022" and think that's a simple solution.  Postponing to this year was hard enough.  Another year might be more trouble than its worth, even if the likelihood of a more open Olympics is higher a year later.

You make a good point but the only other alternative is to postpone it by 11 years until 2032 which would be even worse. Let's be real, the Olympics aren't happening this year. Tokyo is still in a state of emergency. This virus is getting worse, mutating several times into a more infectious and deadlier virus. Look at the shitshow going on with the Australian Open tennis and that's in Australia where there's no community transmission and with only 200 or so athletes. This would be thousands and thousands of athletes from every inch of the earth in a country where Covid has forced a lockdown. I can't see it happening this year at all. So if not 2022, that means 2032. 

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3 hours ago, Olympic Fan Darcy said:

You make a good point but the only other alternative is to postpone it by 11 years until 2032 which would be even worse. Let's be real, the Olympics aren't happening this year. Tokyo is still in a state of emergency. This virus is getting worse, mutating several times into a more infectious and deadlier virus. Look at the shitshow going on with the Australian Open tennis and that's in Australia where there's no community transmission and with only 200 or so athletes. This would be thousands and thousands of athletes from every inch of the earth in a country where Covid has forced a lockdown. I can't see it happening this year at all. So if not 2022, that means 2032. 

No, it doesn't mean that.  The default is not that if Tokyo can't host the Olympics this year or next that they're automatically the 2032 host.  They may not want that.  And they may need some time to determine if they can make that work (or if they want it to work).  They've been in bed with the IOC for 8 years.  Not so easy to pile another 11 years on top of that and spend even more money.  That's why they're so gung ho about pushing forward with this year, even though it's probably a reckless decision to do so.

2 hours ago, Lord David said:

So Tokyo/Japan doesn't want 2022, because Beijing will be hosting the Winter Olympics and taking credit for you know what?

Contracts like sponsorship agreements don't want Tokyo 2022.  It's much more complicated for a lot of interested parties than to just say Tokyo 2022.

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This is going to be an athletes, coaches, and staff only.  A Fanless Olympics.  Its not a complete cancellation, but its going to be pretty dang close.  The athletes are the lynchpin for making it a minimally accepted games.

If thats what transpires, and theres a high probability.  Nooooo way in hell Sapporo bids for the winter Olympics, theyll be extremely jaded with the process and want nothing to do with an Olympics for quite a while.

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On 1/25/2021 at 12:58 AM, iceman530 said:

This is going to be an athletes, coaches, and staff only.  A Fanless Olympics.  Its not a complete cancellation, but its going to be pretty dang close.  The athletes are the lynchpin for making it a minimally accepted games.

If thats what transpires, and theres a high probability.  Nooooo way in hell Sapporo bids for the winter Olympics, theyll be extremely jaded with the process and want nothing to do with an Olympics for quite a while.

But what you are saying supposes that it's the IOC's fault for what has transpired in the world over the last year or so.  I'm not so sure Japan will be jaded and want nothing to do with the Olympics as you suggest.  Now, might they hesitate on a Sapporo bid given the amount of money they have invested in Tokyo 2020 and the cost of bidding for and staging a potential Winter Games, sure, but I'm not sure one depends on the other.  I am quite certain Tokyo would rather have the fanless Olympics you state but still recoup on broadcast money to gain at least something back rather then have a straight cancelation or a swap for the Games in 2032.

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IOC 'not considering' coronavirus vaccine as it pushes ahead with Tokyo Olympics planning

By Tracey Holmes for The Ticket and ABC Sport

Posted 28 January 2021
 
Credit:  ABC News Australia
 
One of the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) most senior officials says the Tokyo Olympic Games will go ahead even if athletes cannot be vaccinated beforehand.

IOC's head of media operations Lucia Montanarella is heavily involved in planning all the operational aspects of the Games with her counterparts from the Tokyo Organising Committee.

She briefed around 280 journalists from the International Sports Press Association (AIPS) on Wednesday morning (AEDT) and was asked whether strict reporting conditions at the Games would be relaxed if athletes, journalists and officials had been vaccinated beforehand.

"The reality is that we made a decision with Tokyo 2020 that we will go ahead and plan these Games without taking into consideration the vaccine and this is what we are doing," Ms Montanarella said.

"At this moment the vaccine doesn't come into play in any of our planning and that's the way we are going ahead.

"We would need another crystal ball to tell you something different but for the moment this is what we are doing — we are not considering the vaccine at all."

Tokyo's contingency plans are referred to as 'Project Crystal' because — according to Ms Montanarella — when the Games were postponed last March the IOC "needed a crystal ball to try and understand how the world will be in 15 months time".

With under six months to go the situation is still no clearer.

"One thing I want to tell you is that from the 24th of March [2020], the day of postponement, within the IOC there has never been a moment that we've been looking at the Tokyo Games as if it will happen, it's always been how we will make it happen," Ms Montanarella said.

"As (IOC) President Thomas Bach keeps saying, 'there is no plan B'."

Speaking from Switzerland on Wednesday evening (local time) Mr Bach reaffirmed that the Games would go ahead.

"The International Olympic Committee is fully concentrated and committed to the successful organisation of the Tokyo summer Olympics this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic," Mr Bach said.

Japan has not yet approved a vaccine inside the host nation, although plans are being drawn up to roll out a vaccination program once the go-ahead is given.

There is no confirmation that all 206 nations expected to send a team to Tokyo will have access to a vaccine and those that have are unlikely to add Olympic athletes to prioritised groups such as the elderly and health care workers.

There has been widespread condemnation any time it has been suggested.

Vaccination not 'obligatory' for athletes

Mr Bach has encouraged all member nations to engage with their own government authorities in the next few weeks to determine the likelihood of vaccinations for athletes and officials but it would not be mandatory in order to take part in the Games, which begin on July 23.

"Vaccination priority should be given to vulnerable groups, nurses, medical doctors and everyone who is keeping our societies safe," Mr Bach said.

"We encourage all the Olympic and Paralympic participants who are offered vaccination to accept it, also as an act of solidarity with the Japanese hosts and their fellow participants."

But Mr Bach added: "Vaccination will not be obligatory."

Federal Sport Minister Richard Colbeck said the Government would speak with the Australian Olympic Committee about the vaccine rollout, but vulnerable groups would be given priority ahead of athletes.

"The rollout of the national COVID-19 vaccine roadmap is an important measure to protect lives and livelihoods," he said in a statement. 

"The roadmap prioritises vulnerable groups including older Australians, frontline workers and those with underlying medical conditions. Other segments of Australia's population will be able to access the vaccine following these vulnerable groups.

"The Government will be consulting with the representatives of the Australian Olympic Committee and national sports bodies on the rollout of the vaccine over coming months and understand their needs in the lead-up to the Olympics."

According to the IOC, a 'tool box' of other COVID-19 countermeasures has been developed, including immigration procedures, quarantine measures, testing, personal protective equipment and contact tracing, as well as vaccination where possible.

The IOC and Tokyo organisers have been watching closely as other events have been staged around the world with the use of COVID-19 bubbles, reduced crowds and limited media access.

Ms Montanarella said there were some good lessons that have been learned but the operational nature of the Olympic Games was a much bigger challenge than any one single sporting event.

"While we are doing everything we can to have the widest media coverage we can at this Games, there will be some restrictions and some of them will be frustrating and there will be days when maybe people will not be able to go where they want," she said.

"The only thing I can say is that Tokyo 2020 and IOC media operations are really trying to do our best to allow for the widest number of people, the widest number of accreditations but … be prepared, it's going to be challenging.

"I don't want it to be a negative message, I want it to be a message conveying that despite all of our work it is not easy to deliver a safe environment if we don't stick with the numbers we have."

The Tokyo Olympic Games will be unlike any held previously, with the exception of the early editions in 1896 and 1900, with limited competitors, few spectators and reduced media coverage.

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‘Not losing our time’: IOC insists Olympic Games will go ahead in Tokyo

Credit:  The Age newspaper

By Latika Bourke  January 28, 2021 — 5.21am

London: The President of the International Olympic Committee insists the already-postponed Tokyo Games will go ahead in July.

But he could not guarantee there would be spectators and denied that pushing ahead with the tournament as the world faces lethal third-waves of the coronavirus pandemic was “irresponsible”.

Speaking to the media after a 4½-hour executive board meeting IOC President Thomas Bach said the body had committed to the Games going ahead.

He said speculation the event would be cancelled or postponed again as the coronavirus pandemic continues to ravage much of the world was hurting the athletes and was not helpful.

“We are not losing our time and energy on the speculations but we are fully concentrating on the opening ceremony on the 23rd of July this year,” he said.

“We are not speculating on whether the Games are taking place, we are working on how the Games will take place.

“We are working on the basis of having all athletes there, in Tokyo, for all events,” he said.

Bach said the Games would require COVID countermeasures for every scenario but said it was too soon to specify what they would be and pleaded for patience.

He said discussions were ongoing and included the World Health Organisation and the makers of vaccines.

Much of Japan is under a state of emergency and hundreds of countries have imposed strict travel bans grinding international travel to a near halt. Recent polls suggest up to 80 per cent of the Japanese population want the Games cancelled or delayed because they fear the event will drive up infections.

Bach said it was not possible to move the Games to another city and said proceeding with them was “clearly not irresponsible.”

“Our task is to organise Olympic Games and not to cancel Olympic Games and our task is to make the dreams of Olympic athletes to come true.”

“If we would think it would be irresponsible and if we would think that the Games could not be safe, we would not go for it. Okay. Principle number one: safe organisation,” he said.

As speculation has raged about the future of the Tokyo Games, so too has debate about whether athletes should be fast-tracked for vaccinations.

While some countries, including Israel which is leading the race to inoculate its population, say their sportsmen and women will be vaccinated in time, others with slower or delayed rollouts are pondering the question.

Australian swimmer and two-time gold medallist Cate Campbell has said athletes should be prioritised if it saves the Games from cancellation.

Asked if athletes should be prioritised for vaccinations, Bach said: “We are not in favour of athletes jumping the queue.” He said it was a question for each government and their Olympic Committees.

The Tokyo Games were to have been held last year, but were delayed for the first time in Olympic history as the pandemic unfolded.

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On 1/25/2021 at 1:49 AM, Quaker2001 said:

No, it doesn't mean that.  The default is not that if Tokyo can't host the Olympics this year or next that they're automatically the 2032 host.  They may not want that.  And they may need some time to determine if they can make that work (or if they want it to work).  They've been in bed with the IOC for 8 years.  Not so easy to pile another 11 years on top of that and spend even more money.  That's why they're so gung ho about pushing forward with this year, even though it's probably a reckless decision to do so.

Contracts like sponsorship agreements don't want Tokyo 2022.  It's much more complicated for a lot of interested parties than to just say Tokyo 2022.

So if not 2022 or 2032, no Olympics for Tokyo then? $33 billion down the drain with no chance of return on investment? 

Cause I do not see it happening this year at all.

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7 hours ago, Olympic Fan Darcy said:

So if not 2022 or 2032, no Olympics for Tokyo then? $33 billion down the drain with no chance of return on investment? 

Cause I do not see it happening this year at all.

No idea if Tokyo can postpone for another year without spending billions more.  To say nothing of what that does with sponsorship agreements and other contracts that would be affected by the Tokyo Olympics happening after the Beijing Olympics.

As for 2032.. if Tokyo was to get locked into that now, how many more billions would they have to spend to have people working on it for 11 more years?  They would have to completely scrap a lot of the current plans and who knows how much that would cost.  Maybe Tokyo would be interested in that, but they would need to think about it for awhile.  Because some of the things they were planning for these Olympics (most notably the athletes' village) won't be possible a decade from now.

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7 hours ago, Olympic Fan Darcy said:

So if not 2022 or 2032, no Olympics for Tokyo then? $33 billion down the drain with no chance of return on investment? 

Cause I do not see it happening this year at all.

It could happen, 

I was absolutely shocked to see the NFL season go on during the pandemic.  I thought for sure that this season would not last 8 games.  But here we are.  NHL, Premier League, NBA are all getting it done too.  If the NFL, with a roster of 53 men plus staff that are hell bent on smacking the crap out of each other can go off in a controlled environment, a bunch of track and field guys, row teams, and swimmers sure as hell can.  Hell if theyre smart, they call up the NFL and see how they went about it (sans the Titans, Browns, and Ravens.  But theyd still be useful case studies about what went wrong.)

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On 1/29/2021 at 3:43 AM, iceman530 said:

It could happen, 

I was absolutely shocked to see the NFL season go on during the pandemic.  I thought for sure that this season would not last 8 games.  But here we are.  NHL, Premier League, NBA are all getting it done too.  If the NFL, with a roster of 53 men plus staff that are hell bent on smacking the crap out of each other can go off in a controlled environment, a bunch of track and field guys, row teams, and swimmers sure as hell can.  Hell if theyre smart, they call up the NFL and see how they went about it (sans the Titans, Browns, and Ravens.  But theyd still be useful case studies about what went wrong.)

Look at the preparations for the Australian Open tennis. It'll likely go ahead but that was with a hard 2 week quarantine and more. That's around 200-300 people. This is 10,000-20,000 people with their athletes and their coaches, teams, physio etc. You really think this event will happen? Yeah those nation wide leagues like NHL and NBA happened, this is the largest sporting event in the world. Let's not play dumb. 

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On 1/29/2021 at 3:26 AM, Quaker2001 said:

No idea if Tokyo can postpone for another year without spending billions more.  To say nothing of what that does with sponsorship agreements and other contracts that would be affected by the Tokyo Olympics happening after the Beijing Olympics.

As for 2032.. if Tokyo was to get locked into that now, how many more billions would they have to spend to have people working on it for 11 more years?  They would have to completely scrap a lot of the current plans and who knows how much that would cost.  Maybe Tokyo would be interested in that, but they would need to think about it for awhile.  Because some of the things they were planning for these Olympics (most notably the athletes' village) won't be possible a decade from now.

So what is the solution? 

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4 hours ago, Olympic Fan Darcy said:

So what is the solution? 

I have no idea.  I don't know if 2022 is an option.  And if you're looking at 2032, that might as well be a brand new bid.

Pushing ahead to make this happen this summer is probably not the smartest idea.  But I don't know what the alternative is.

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Sports world holds its breath for Tokyo’s Olympic COVID ‘playbook’

Credit: Brisbane Times
By Phil Lutton January 30, 2021 — 11.00pm

After postponements and endless uncertainty about how the Olympic Games in Tokyo will play out, next week will bring some long-awaited detail from the hosts and organisers.

It will arrive on February 5 in the form of an official “playbook” from the International Olympic Committee, which will for the first time shed clear light on exactly how the IOC and their Japanese hosts plan to ensure a safe and successful Games for about 15,000 Olympic and Paralympic athletes.

The IOC needs the playbook to be well received as it tries to convince the world the Games can be salvaged. Earlier this month, it had to hose down reports the Japanese government was already resigned to cancelling the Olympics and had been workshopping various exit strategies, one of which was to try to claim the 2032 spot, which south-east Queensland remains favourite to snare.

Sceptics still believe the Games simply can’t be held in the current COVID-19 environment and both Tokyo organisers and the IOC are planning for an event where vaccines are not in play, although the more athletes are given access to doses before the July 23 opening the better.

The flow-on effects of a triumphant staging — or a costly cancellation — are immense, from the athletes wondering if five years of work are about to vanish into thin air to potential hosts more than a decade down the track.

Who pays the price?

Already, these summer Games are forecast to be among the most expensive in history, with delays blowing out an already bloated budget that sits close to $20 billion. That figure is likely to be conservative and any cancellation would be an immense blow to the coffers of the IOC, which relies heavily (75 per cent of revenue) on broadcast deals to fund its operations.

But the brunt of the Games will be carried by the Japanese taxpayer, says Matt Nichol, a Melbourne-based sports law academic with a particular interest in Japan. Those taxpayers aren’t likely to get a return on investment even if a slimline Games limps into life.

“In terms of real skin in the game, it’s not the IOC or broadcasters of sponsors or athletes, it’s the Japanese citizen. The total cost at the end of last year was about $US12.5 billion. And that money has been spent,” Nichol says.

“You get sold on the economic benefit of a Games, the legacy of the infrastructure and the exposure and the tourism. And however these Games are going to play out, they just aren’t going to get that usual return.

“However you break it down, the city of Tokyo and Greater Tokyo, they are going to wear the costs.”

How have the key Olympic sports coped?

Rohan Taylor is the head coach of the nation’s highest-profile Olympic sport and is as eager as anyone to see what kind of specifics the IOC playbook contains. His swimmers have become accustomed to upheaval, he says, but some real, tangible organisational scaffolding ahead of Tokyo would come as a blessing.

“Human nature doesn’t like uncertainty. We don’t respond well to that and there is a constant, swirling uncertainty around these Olympics. For us, we have to try and maintain the plans to get a group of athletes, coaches and staff and to get to Tokyo and perform at their best,” Taylor says.

“Those are the things that really guide us to ensure we prepare our team correctly. We have to be able to move into that space [in Japan] and be compliant but also we want some of that certainty. We’ll talk about the types of scenarios that may emerge and we feel like we can cope with anything now ... we’ve dealt with a lot already.

“But once we get some information from the IOC, that will definitely settle the nerves a bit.”

What of Australia’s bid for the 2032 Olympics?

Australia remains one of the favourites to host the Games of 2032, with the south-east Queensland bid having support from every level of government and progressing faster than many observers may have realised.

Brisbane’s lord mayor, Adrian Schrinner, confessed to a shortness of breath when he heard reports that Japan may withdraw and ask the IOC to in turn award them the 2032 Games. With that quickly dismissed, he says 2021 is a key year for Queensland’s bid as discussions with the IOC gain pace.

“It’s very exciting. All three levels of government are on board and working feverishly. There was a lull for a period last year where there wasn’t so much talk about the Olympics, but that didn’t mean things weren’t continuing behind the scenes. Now, it’s just a matter of getting down to targeted discussions and hopefully make it a reality,” Schrinner says.

“That is something that could happen any time now. I think 2021 will be the critical year for this … I really do think that. It may not be that a decision is made this year but ... a decision could be made at any stage from now on, essentially.”

The new bidding process has ended the days of costly presentations and years of greasing wheels in the hope of a final vote. Now, Schrinner says, there is a “constant dialogue” with the IOC that has progressed to a point where certain guarantees, like the ability to present a carbon-neutral Games, are being sought.

More than anything, an Australian Games looks like an extremely safe bet for an IOC that would love to have its next three Games locked in after the drama of Tokyo. That, Schrinner says, is a major selling point.

“That’s the case we’re putting forward to the IOC … we are a capable, safe set of hands to host an event of this magnitude.”

What do the athletes need to know before Tokyo?

According to Cate Campbell, Australia’s star freestyle sprinter and multiple Olympic gold medallist, not as much as you’d think. It’s not exactly “shut up and swim” but Campbell has become content to stay at arm’s length from the speculation and ensure she is ready to fire once the Games eventually begin.

“Ian Chesterman (Australia’s Chef de Mission) has been very good with communicating and making things really transparent but also, how much do athletes really need to know? An athlete’s job is to turn up and perform their best on the day. The organisers have the job to provide an environment where that can happen,” Campbell says.

“As long as those two parties are doing everything they can to get the best result, then I don’t need to know the ins and outs of plans A to Z. All I need to do is train and if there is important information, that will filter down to me.

“I just need to know what are the changes and how it affects my training and racing. And you can plan from there. Until then, it’s enough to know the Olympics are actually going ahead.”

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They should let Tokyo do 2028 and push L.A. back to 2032. Then L.A. could celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 1932 Los Angeles Olympic Games. It’s not like L.A.’s investment is so big, as most venues are existing or were going to be temporary. Plus, the stadium being built will be filled with NFL games in the meantime. This makes sense to me and I can’t imagine the IOC, Tokyo and L.A. haven’t thought about this scenario. Just get together and work it out.

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2 hours ago, LQC said:

They should let Tokyo do 2028 and push L.A. back to 2032. Then L.A. could celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 1932 Los Angeles Olympic Games. It’s not like L.A.’s investment is so big, as most venues are existing or were going to be temporary. Plus, the stadium being built will be filled with NFL games in the meantime. This makes sense to me and I can’t imagine the IOC, Tokyo and L.A. haven’t thought about this scenario. Just get together and work it out.

Yea, that's not how any of this works.  I'm fairly certain Tokyo hasn't thought about this scenario and there is zero chance LA has considered it.  It's costing Tokyo $3 billion to delay the games by a year.  What's going to happen if it's another 7 years?  They might have to come up with a brand new plan, particularly with regard to the Olympic Village.  That's not something they can hold off if they have to postpone again after this year.  It doesn't really make that much sense when you take a closer look for it.

As for LA, they have a contract and plans in place for 2028.  What's in it for them to push everything back another 4 years?  You can't just say "well, their stadium will have NFL games, so it's no big deal to them."  That stadium was not built with any consideration for the Olympics, so it's a moot point.  LA was willing to take 2028 after their 2024 bid because the IOC made it worth their while.  I doubt they'll be looking at pushing things back further to do Tokyo a solid.

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An Olympics with no cheering: IOC reveals first COVID playbook

Credit: Sydney Morning Herald - by Phil Lutton, February 3, 2021 — 9.48pm

 

Tokyo organisers and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) have provided the first glimpse of how the Tokyo Games will function during a pandemic, releasing a series of guidelines in a COVID “playbook” while promising a safe Olympic and Paralympic Games in the northern hemisphere summer.

But the pages of the first book are light on detail, with the IOC and local organising committee painting with a deliberate broad brush as they try to convince sceptics that the world’s biggest multi-sport event, already postponed once, can avoid being a super-spreader event as tens of thousands of athletes, officials and media travel to Japan.

Even so, it’s a significant document which outlines a timeline that begins 14 days before travelling to Tokyo, arrival in the city, the experience during the Games and subsequent departure. More details will be released in updated playbooks as the July Games draw closer, each targeting different groups of attendees.

The first playbook is aimed at delegates of international sporting federations, judges and technical officials and includes pre-departure testing, use of a smartphone app for contact tracing, testing on arrival, testing during the stay and constant use of face masks.

It also says anyone in venues should only clap athletes, not cheer or shout, to avoid any extra possibility of spreading virus particles. It will, if nothing else, be the most polite Olympics yet held.

Specific advice for athletes has yet to be released, while Games operation director Pierre Ducrey told a press briefing that the first document and subsequent playbooks would be nimble and could change depending on the COVID environment closer to the Games.

He said the Games were running on the assumption a vaccine was not in play but any athletes or stakeholders who were able to be vaccinated as per their country’s stipulated timeline would be of significant benefit.

“For all Games participants, there will be some conditions and constraints that will require flexibility and understanding,” Ducrey said. “We are providing the main directions at this stage but naturally don’t have all the final details yet.

“We will make sure all the information needed is shared as quickly as possible to ensure we are fully prepared to protect all those coming to and residing in Japan during the Tokyo 2020 Games.”

Tokyo officials would not speculate what would happen if accredited participants violated the rules but said there would be a ‘procudere in place’ for those caught out. Ducrey said all stakeholders would have to be responsible for their own plans and ensure they followed the most recent rules.

Given the contents of the first playbook, it stands to be a solitary Games. Participants are told to avoid social interaction whenever possible and to stay clear of public transport, using only official Games transport.

Many answers are yet to be provided but those targeted in the first playbook must plan early and have a negative test certificate and present a detailed activity plan for their first 14 days in Tokyo. The negative test must be taken within 72 hours of departure.

They will also have to use an app to monitor and detail their health for 14 days before travel and prepare a list of anyone who they will be in close contact with during their stay in Japan.

Accredited participants must take a COVID test on arrival in Japan and be prepared to move quickly through the aiport en route to their accommodation. Details for athletes remain cloudy but they are likely to be required to remain in the village during their stay and arrive no more than five days before competition.

There would be regular tests during the stay for accredited participants and anyone with symptoms would be expected to test and isolate immediately. The IOC did confirm that athletes would not require to quarantine before arrival but instead record a detailed health log and present a series of negative tests.

More information for athletes will be forthcoming over the next week, which will come as a huge relief for sports and teams attempting to plan their lead-up to a Games that will be regarded a minor miracle if it is staged without an outbreak.

The issue for Australian attendees may not be going to Tokyo but returning home, with two-week hotel quarantine compulsory at this stage.

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