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Beijing 2022 Ceremonies


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7 hours ago, blueview2 said:

You sure its LED? looks like 3d mapping with a ginormous amount of projectors in the rigging. The led might be in the wall in the center, but the floor is projections. With an extremely rehearsed routine and few artistic segments, i doubt they will have much need for the floor to be interactive anyway.  

Yes, they were LED screens.

Commentators said that hundreds of times in TVN,  broadcasting for Chile.

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Mt thoughts about the ceremony:

-          Even when I didn’t have my expectation too high, due to we were facing the second “pandemic ceremony” and having too fresh in mind what Tokyo offered us just few months ago, adding the limited time they had (just 100 minutes) you couldn’t expect a show that could top Vancouver or Sochi. With all those limitations, what Beijing, in its second opening ceremony at the same Bird Nest Stadium, made a ceremony that I can say more than “good”. Also, we couldn’t expect a mass show (despite of what we saw for the China National Games even fewer months ago) since it was going to be carried out according to the Olympic protocol under strict covid rules. Yimou replaced mass for high tech. And really it was HIGH TECH! with a ceremony based on aerials and last generation LED screens with motion sensors…  taking the technology for ceremonies to a new level.

-          The environment seemed a lot more vivid and cheerful than the Tokyo’s mourning-style. We could feel again that it was an Opening Ceremony and not a tribute to everyone and everything that lasted 4 hours (or 2 in this case).

-          The segments were mixed with the protocol and it may interrupt the anxiety we can feel when we watch an Opening Ceremony. Anyway, the segments were truly lavish!

-          We are getting used to “videos countdown” since London (despite it had a “stadium” London) and Beijing 2022 was not the exception. Coincidentally, February 4 marks the beginning of the spring according to the 24 solar terms of the Chinese lunar year and the 24th Winter Olympics.

-          Visually stunning, the first impression of the green brunches (which their colours reminded me “Pindorama” segment from Rio 2016) could lead to the first “wow” factor after Rio, totally absent in Tokyo and PyeonChang.

-          The Chinese flag welcome was a hint of what we saw in 2008 ceremony, adding modern factors, such the inclusion of “street” people and the children playing the trumpet interpretating a piece of music from an Old Chinese movie.

-          Then, the high tech started in majesty: the Chinese ink becoming the Yellow river, “flooding” the stadium was another stunning moment. We could appreciate, at that moment, that we were facing a replacement from the classic mass Chinese shows to a High tech show. I loved the ice arising from the floor, following the tradition of the Winter Games of remembering all the previous edition (which was skipped in Sochi) and then breaking the ice to emerge the Olympic rings. This maybe my favourite part of the ceremony. It called my attention that for the 1960 Winter Games, we could red “Lake Tahoe” instead the official name of the games: “Squaw Valley”… why?

-          The parade was fast, entertaining and cheerful. The snowflakes, as the plaques, was unique but not original. In 2015 we could see LED panels as plaques for the Opening Ceremony of the Pan Am Games in Toronto.

-          The ceremony continued at Yimou style: cheering people walking through the interactive panel discovering images of people around the world, another hint of what we saw before the torch lighting in 2008 when Li Ning, flying, discovered the route of the flame ass he passed by.

-          A new version of “imagine” was played. At this point I don’t know if this song belongs to the new Olympic Protocol for ceremonies, such as double flag bearers, joint oaths and the next host country marching next to last. I think that after listening to “imagine” in Torino, London (at least it was the country of the author), PyeongChang and Tokyo we’d had more than enough… What’s next? Someone singing “imagine” in French version on the Seine River?

-          The peace segment was unified with the Torch Segment. One by one the barely known torch, was approaching to what all of us were expecting: the cauldron that was going to be lit in an “unprecedent” way, while a children song was used as the background. By the way, that was another visually stunning high-tech segment.

-          Effectively, the flame was “lit” in an unprecedent way: NO CAULDRON AT ALL! Just was the torch which was put in the middle of the giant floating snowflakes, formed by the names of the countries which were the plaques on the parade…. But OK, Yimou thinks in everything:

Did the flame from Olympia arrive to the stadium? Yes

Is the Olympic Flame present in the ceremony? Yes

Is now, what was condemned to be the most infamous Olympic torch of the history, worldwide well-known? Yes

OK… Mission accomplished!

They appealed to sustainability and no gas emission… what about the fireworks, then?

This “lighting” of the cauldron ceremony left in me the feeling of… “it is not over, yet”…

An original, but weird, maybe, the weirdest idea for the Olympic Flame.

My conclusion: no taking in consideration the “no cauldron” factor (who broke the most important tradition for an opening ceremony, turning it into a sort of “queen’s baton” relay) it was a simple, short, well done and impressive ceremony. A pandemic ceremony, well executed who successfully replaced the (may be ancient) mass segments by stunning technology… OK, Beijing… you didn’t right!!!

the-olympic-rings-during-the-opening-cer

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It's just a fact of broadcasting now that most things are getting their lowest ever ratings due to the explosion of streaming options in the last couple of years.

I do think the time difference with Paris though might see a return to just the pre-recorded primetime screening on NBC itself anyway (perhaps with it live exclusively on Peacock), as a 3pm airing will hit the primetime screening more than a 7am screening will.

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Scenes from their country as athletes marched past?

Wow, it looks like in the Parade of Nations that athletes could see scenes from their own country on the huge LED high definition screen on the stadium floor as they marched in on it.

How cool is that! What a welcome for them.
 

zDW19n4.jpg

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42 minutes ago, AustralianFan said:

Scenes from their country as athletes marched past?

Wow, it looks like in the Parade of Nations that athletes could see scenes from their own country on the huge LED high definition screen on the stadium floor as they marched in on it.

How cool is that! What a welcome for them.
 

zDW19n4.jpg

Was it? For what I saw on the official feed, most of the pics were from China

Open-Ceremony-2160p-04-02-2022-Nikolay-m

Open-Ceremony-2160p-04-02-2022-Nikolay-m

Open-Ceremony-2160p-04-02-2022-Nikolay-m

 

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11 hours ago, Nacholympic said:

Mt thoughts about the ceremony:

-          Even when I didn’t have my expectation too high, due to we were facing the second “pandemic ceremony” and having too fresh in mind what Tokyo offered us just few months ago, adding the limited time they had (just 100 minutes) you couldn’t expect a show that could top Vancouver or Sochi. With all those limitations, what Beijing, in its second opening ceremony at the same Bird Nest Stadium, made a ceremony that I can say more than “good”. Also, we couldn’t expect a mass show (despite of what we saw for the China National Games even fewer months ago) since it was going to be carried out according to the Olympic protocol under strict covid rules. Yimou replaced mass for high tech. And really it was HIGH TECH! with a ceremony based on aerials and last generation LED screens with motion sensors…  taking the technology for ceremonies to a new level.

-          The environment seemed a lot more vivid and cheerful than the Tokyo’s mourning-style. We could feel again that it was an Opening Ceremony and not a tribute to everyone and everything that lasted 4 hours (or 2 in this case).

-          The segments were mixed with the protocol and it may interrupt the anxiety we can feel when we watch an Opening Ceremony. Anyway, the segments were truly lavish!

-          We are getting used to “videos countdown” since London (despite it had a “stadium” London) and Beijing 2022 was not the exception. Coincidentally, February 4 marks the beginning of the spring according to the 24 solar terms of the Chinese lunar year and the 24th Winter Olympics.

-          Visually stunning, the first impression of the green brunches (which their colours reminded me “Pindorama” segment from Rio 2016) could lead to the first “wow” factor after Rio, totally absent in Tokyo and PyeonChang.

-          The Chinese flag welcome was a hint of what we saw in 2008 ceremony, adding modern factors, such the inclusion of “street” people and the children playing the trumpet interpretating a piece of music from an Old Chinese movie.

-          Then, the high tech started in majesty: the Chinese ink becoming the Yellow river, “flooding” the stadium was another stunning moment. We could appreciate, at that moment, that we were facing a replacement from the classic mass Chinese shows to a High tech show. I loved the ice arising from the floor, following the tradition of the Winter Games of remembering all the previous edition (which was skipped in Sochi) and then breaking the ice to emerge the Olympic rings. This maybe my favourite part of the ceremony. It called my attention that for the 1960 Winter Games, we could red “Lake Tahoe” instead the official name of the games: “Squaw Valley”… why?

-          The parade was fast, entertaining and cheerful. The snowflakes, as the plaques, was unique but not original. In 2015 we could see LED panels as plaques for the Opening Ceremony of the Pan Am Games in Toronto.

-          The ceremony continued at Yimou style: cheering people walking through the interactive panel discovering images of people around the world, another hint of what we saw before the torch lighting in 2008 when Li Ning, flying, discovered the route of the flame ass he passed by.

-          A new version of “imagine” was played. At this point I don’t know if this song belongs to the new Olympic Protocol for ceremonies, such as double flag bearers, joint oaths and the next host country marching next to last. I think that after listening to “imagine” in Torino, London (at least it was the country of the author), PyeongChang and Tokyo we’d had more than enough… What’s next? Someone singing “imagine” in French version on the Seine River?

-          The peace segment was unified with the Torch Segment. One by one the barely known torch, was approaching to what all of us were expecting: the cauldron that was going to be lit in an “unprecedent” way, while a children song was used as the background. By the way, that was another visually stunning high-tech segment.

-          Effectively, the flame was “lit” in an unprecedent way: NO CAULDRON AT ALL! Just was the torch which was put in the middle of the giant floating snowflakes, formed by the names of the countries which were the plaques on the parade…. But OK, Yimou thinks in everything:

Did the flame from Olympia arrive to the stadium? Yes

Is the Olympic Flame present in the ceremony? Yes

Is now, what was condemned to be the most infamous Olympic torch of the history, worldwide well-known? Yes

OK… Mission accomplished!

They appealed to sustainability and no gas emission… what about the fireworks, then?

This “lighting” of the cauldron ceremony left in me the feeling of… “it is not over, yet”…

An original, but weird, maybe, the weirdest idea for the Olympic Flame.

My conclusion: no taking in consideration the “no cauldron” factor (who broke the most important tradition for an opening ceremony, turning it into a sort of “queen’s baton” relay) it was a simple, short, well done and impressive ceremony. A pandemic ceremony, well executed who successfully replaced the (may be ancient) mass segments by stunning technology… OK, Beijing… you didn’t right!!!

the-olympic-rings-during-the-opening-cer

nice and in well comprehensive english from a latin american point of view..

i loved your way of feedback @Nacholympic ..

maybe it would be better if you copy/paste you feedback on the other thread

AND give you points/verdict on it.. would be a rich text as how we users experience  it over the globe.. ;)

as the second opening ceremony in covid-times after TOKYO 2020 +1

 

 

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"Kids with doves" scene in OC sparked political speculations on Chinese social media

A report on HK news site hk01.com, later picked up by Taiwan News:

Quote

A program in the opening spectacle featured hundreds of children holding peace dove-shaped lanterns and gathered to form a heart at the center of the stage. One of the kids appeared to be lagging behind and was only able to find her way back to the group with the assistance of a senior performer.

The scene has triggered heated talk among netizens in China’s microblog platform Weibo, with some reading much into the performance. Some netizens believe the “missing dove” was intended as a metaphor for “Taiwan losing its way” and waiting to be “brought back into China’s fold,” per hk01.

In a Weibo post, the Central Committee of the Communist Youth League of China shared a GIF image of the scene, with the Chinese caption “Lost child, go home early.” The fact that the “lone dove” was standing to the southeast of the “flock of doves” only makes the parallel more compelling considering the location of Taiwan.

The report later clarified that this snippet is in fact an impromptu from Tian Tian, director of this chapter. She said that during rehearsal, one kid was trailing behind others and was led back into the team, and because "this is a very warm picture, very warm and very happy", she included it in the final program.

The "trailing dove" scene:
4epvPS4BSNfoOpVdHwa27Cn6skr_HeFvFbAPERWwDxE?v=w1920

https://cdn.hk01.com/media/images/dw/20220205/566657797995892736265710.mp4

Chinese Communist Youth League post on Weibo:

1644133109-61ff7af53954b.jpg

Meme from Weibo: text reads: (upper) "Let's return home!"; (lower) "Taiwan"

1644135374-61ff83ce7e2a5.jpg

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

Scenes from their country as athletes marched past?

Wow, it looks like in the Parade of Nations that athletes could see scenes from their own country on the huge LED high definition screen on the stadium floor as they marched in on it.

How cool is that! What a welcome for them

Props for supporting the athletes by your dedication in reassuring us that the stadium floor they walked on was the greatest achievement ever in Olympic history!

Edited by Sir Rols
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I think it was just taken out of context, but its still bad because it shows how brainwashed are people living in the Mainland given the comments and interpretations they made in Weibo.

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

Scenes from their country as athletes marched past?

Wow, it looks like in the Parade of Nations that athletes could see scenes from their own country on the huge LED high definition screen on the stadium floor as they marched in on it.

How cool is that! What a welcome for them.
 

zDW19n4.jpg

In addition to most (if not all) of the scenes being from China, they were designed to be viewed from the position of the main TV cameras, and (as with previous ceremonies' floor animations) would seem very weird from anywhere else in the stadium.

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More controversies regarding the opening ceremony. One of the ethnicities which helped carry the Chinese flag during the opening ceremony was dressing a Hanbok (national dress of Korea), which caused an uproar among Korean netizens due to what they consider China's claiming their culture. And trust me, they are very vicious when it comes to defend their cultural elements.

https://www.dw.com/en/china-blasted-for-cultural-appropriation-at-olympics-opening-ceremony/a-60674763

Quote

China blasted for 'cultural appropriation' at Olympics opening ceremony

Politicians in Seoul were angered by the display of a traditional Korean dress at the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony. One lawmaker accused China of showing off Korean culture "as if it were its own."

60674604_303.jpg

A performer at the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics drew condemnation in South Korea on Saturday for wearing a traditional Korean dress known as hanbok.

The young woman wearing the pink-and-white dress was carrying a Chinese flag as part of a group of other performers representing the country's various ethnic groups.

China is home to one of the world's largest populations of Koreans living abroad. The two countries share deep cultural links.

But the appearance of the hanbok sparked anger online in South Korea, with many accusing Beijing of "cultural appropriation" and of "stealing" the country's culture.

"We deeply regret that hanbok appeared among the costumes of Chinese minorities at the opening ceremony of the Beijing Winter Olympics," South Korean ruling party lawmaker Lee So-young wrote on her Facebook page on Saturday

"This is not the first time China has introduced Korean culture as if it were its own. ... If the anti-China sentiment of the Korean people becomes stronger by leaving this issue as is, it will be a big obstacle when conducting diplomacy with China in the future," Lee said.

News

China blasted for 'cultural appropriation' at Olympics opening ceremony

Politicians in Seoul were angered by the display of a traditional Korean dress at the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony. One lawmaker accused China of showing off Korean culture "as if it were its own."

 

A woman wears the traditional hanbok dress at the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony

A performer at the Beijing Olympics opening ceremony wore the pink and white hanbok dress to highlight the country's ethnic minorities

A performer at the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics drew condemnation in South Korea on Saturday for wearing a traditional Korean dress known as hanbok.

The young woman wearing the pink-and-white dress was carrying a Chinese flag as part of a group of other performers representing the country's various ethnic groups.

China is home to one of the world's largest populations of Koreans living abroad. The two countries share deep cultural links.

But the appearance of the hanbok sparked anger online in South Korea, with many accusing Beijing of "cultural appropriation" and of "stealing" the country's culture.

"We deeply regret that hanbok appeared among the costumes of Chinese minorities at the opening ceremony of the Beijing Winter Olympics," South Korean ruling party lawmaker Lee So-young wrote on her Facebook page on Saturday

"This is not the first time China has introduced Korean culture as if it were its own. ... If the anti-China sentiment of the Korean people becomes stronger by leaving this issue as is, it will be a big obstacle when conducting diplomacy with China in the future," Lee said.

 
 
Watch video 02:49

China picks Uyghur athlete to light Olympic cauldron

Korean presidential candidates call out Beijing

The faux pas is not the first time that there has been strife between the countries over cultural issues. South Koreans have expressed ire in the past over recent Chinese claims that kimchi, a Korean side dish made with fermented cabbage, is of Chinese origin.

South Korean culture minister Hwang Hee attended Friday's opening ceremony in Beijing. He said his government had no plans to officially complain to Beijing over the costume, but he added that the issue "may create misunderstandings" between the two countries.

Two rival electoral candidates for Korea's presidency blasted China. Leading candidate Lee Jae-myung called Beijing out for "cultural appropriation," while his main opponent, conservative Yoon Suk-yeol, also accused China of being "disrespectful."    

Seems this is not the first time they do it. Early last year there was a big controversy and a huge war between Korean netizens and Wumaos

Koreans overall have been very annoyed by these games, not only because of this but what they consider a massive rig in the speed skating event.

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