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21 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

No, the IOC has stated that they are no longer bound by that 7 year-lead time rule.  They've said that they can pick/announce a host city any time if the conditions are right.  I suppose if Sapporo and Salt Lake are the only serious contenders for both 2030 and 2034; they can lock them in early or much later than the normal 7 years.  

20 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

Definitely not a one-off, it is much more than that.  Further,, the traditional IOC 7-year  election/hosting timeline is officially out the window, as Baron said.

Under the previous adoption of Agenda2020 and last year”s passing of the additional ‘New Norm’ reforms, a Host City can be voted on at any time.  It is the IOC’s New Norm.

It is widely expected that the IOC will vote on the 2032 Summer Host around 2021-2022.

Yea, good luck with that.  They may have been able to do that before the pandemic.  No way it's happening now.  The IOC is going to be busy spending the next year salvaging the Tokyo Olympics.  After that, only a few months until Beijing.  Then maybe they can start focusing on 2032.  So we are at the bare minimum 2 years away from naming a host, and who knows what cities might step up before then given the state of the world.  

Yes, 7 years is no longer the official standard.  But do we expect to get a 2030 host much before 2023?  Probably not.  And we might not see a 2032 host until after that at this point.  Because the conditions probably won't be right until then.  Lets see how these new norms/Agenda 2020 actually play out, particularly now that COVID-19 may have had a ripple effect beyond just Tokyo's Olympics getting postponed

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1 hour ago, Quaker2001 said:

Yea, good luck with that.  They may have been able to do that before the pandemic.  No way it's happening now.  The IOC is going to be busy spending the next year salvaging the Tokyo Olympics.  After that, only a few months until Beijing.  Then maybe they can start focusing on 2032.  So we are at the bare minimum 2 years away from naming a host, and who knows what cities might step up before then given the state of the world.  

Yes, 7 years is no longer the official standard.  But do we expect to get a 2030 host much before 2023?  Probably not.  And we might not see a 2032 host until after that at this point.  Because the conditions probably won't be right until then.  Lets see how these new norms/Agenda 2020 actually play out, particularly now that COVID-19 may have had a ripple effect beyond just Tokyo's Olympics getting postponed

You make it sound like the IOC can’t cope with a crisis, that they ade going to fall to pieces over Covid-19.

The IOC have been managing and multi-tasking through crises since the year dot - political boycotts, world wars, cancelled games, postponed games, pandemics, epidemics, internal and external corruption, to name just a few.

They’re not just one small team sitting around the boardroom table doing everything.

While managing Covid-19 issues and postponed Tokyo, the IOC will firmly keep an eye on locking in future Hosts and will still very likely vote on the 2032 Summer Host in 2021 or 2022  (and quite possibly the 2030 and 2034 Winter Hosts as well).

It’s their job.   It’s in their DNA.

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7 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

You make it sound like the IOC can’t cope with a crisis, that they ade going to fall to pieces over Covid-19.

The IOC have been managing and multi-tasking through crises since the year dot - political boycotts, world wars, cancelled games, postponed games, pandemics, epidemics, internal and external corruption, to name just a few.

They’re not just one small team sitting around the boardroom table doing everything.

While managing Covid-19 issues and postponed Tokyo, the IOC will firmly keep an eye on locking in future Hosts and will still very likely vote on the 2032 Summer Host in 2021 or 2022  (and quite possibly the 2030 and 2034 Winter Hosts as well).

It’s their job.   It’s in their DNA.

Their DNA?  What exactly does that even mean?

Yes, the IOC has weathered crises before.  In the 70s and 80s, their mere existence was under threat, but they managed to steer their way through those rough waters and re-emerge as strong as ever.  Remains to be seen if that's going to happen in the upcoming decade.

The IOC doesn't exactly have the most stellar reputation around the world these days.  The number of cities offering themselves up to host the Olympics has been shrinking for quite some time.  Which was why we've seen the IOC re-think their selection process for choosing a host city.  A large reason for that is because these cites and countries don't want to work with the IOC anymore.  We've seen numerous cities put together a plan to host the Olympics and have that fall apart either because of poor management or because the will of the citizens to push back and force referendums has ended their efforts.  That's something the IOC has rarely had to deal with throughout their history, let alone on the scale we're seeing now.  It's not like it's just 1 or 2 cities where that's happening.  The number of failed bids is greatly outnumbering the number of bids that manage to get far enough to be presented to the IOC.

And now we're dealing with COVID-19, which has postponed an Olympics for the first time in their history, and still leaves in question how things are going to look next summer.  The questions that will continue to come up over the next year is who will pay the costs for the delay.  Is the onus on Japan and the organizers to spend the money necessary?  How much is the IOC helping them out?  It's another point where prospective host cities for future Olympics will question the relationship between the IOC and the host city.  It may cause those cities to question their involvement with the Olympics if it's going to cost them more money than it's worth.  It's not a matter of the IOC being able to deal with the Tokyo Olympics and work towards future Olympics at the same time.  It's about those cities rethinking their plans now that the reality of a pandemic has reared its ugly head.

So yes.. the IOC certainly has an eye towards 2030 and 2032 and beyond.  It's a lucky break for them that they don't need to think about 2028.  But where Tokyo 2020 would have been in the rear-view mirror 3 months from now, instead it's something they have to manage for an additional year.  Among other things, that certainly puts a hold on Sapporo's efforts to put together a bid for 2030.  And you can be sure that the folks in Queensland will want to see how the next year plays out before they sign on the dotted line (assuming they wind up being the IOC's choice for 2032)

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

While managing Covid-19 issues and postponed Tokyo, the IOC will firmly keep an eye on locking in future Hosts and will still very likely vote on the 2032 Summer Host in 2021 or 2022  (and quite possibly the 2030 and 2034 Winter Hosts as well).

It’s their job.   It’s in their DNA.

While I agree with you for the most part -- and the IOC can do it, with an organization of more than 600 PAID employees, sure.  

But between global pandemics and the Olympics being the most blatant example of how a new virus can be so quickly and intensively spread, I think the IOC and the sports federations might have to think of new models.  (Why, there's even question at this point whether the Democrats will go ahead with their convention this year.  The Republicans, pandemic or no pandemic, will go ahead with their show in Charlotte, because Donald loves that sort of thing and the coronation (notice the built-in word there; - virus missing) ceremony.  They will need to wow people with the footage there.  But I digress . . .)

I think the IOC and its choice of host cities -- and its contracts with NBC and the other big networks -- will have to be open to the fact that their big shows might not go on at all in the future.  So contingency arrangements will now have to be spelled out ad infintum in the Host City contracts.  But the IOC shouldn't feel too bad; they don't have the billion dollar stadia like the newly opened Chase Center, SoFi and Reliant stadia with no games to fill them.  That should also be a lesson for cities to stop fronting public monies for these showcase white elephants.  

But I think the real story behind this pandemic phenomenon -- that Covid-19 is really a Russian invention -- out to sabotage the IOC, has yet to be told!!  ;)

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18 minutes ago, baron-pierreIV said:

While I agree with you for the most part -- and the IOC can do it, with an organization of more than 600 PAID employees, sure.  

But between global pandemics and the Olympics being the most blatant example of how a new virus can be so quickly and intensively spread, I think the IOC and the sports federations might have to think of new models.  (Why, there's even question at this point whether the Democrats will go ahead with their convention this year.  The Republicans, pandemic or no pandemic, will go ahead with their show in Charlotte, because Donald loves that sort of thing and the coronation (notice the built-in word there; - virus missing) ceremony.  They will need to wow people with the footage there.  But I digress . . .)

I think the IOC and its choice of host cities -- and its contracts with NBC and the other big networks -- will have to be open to the fact that their big shows might not go on at all in the future.  So contingency arrangements will now have to be spelled out ad infintum in the Host City contracts.  But the IOC shouldn't feel too bad; they don't have the billion dollar stadia like the newly opened Chase Center, SoFi and Reliant stadia with no games to fill them.  That should also be a lesson for cities to stop fronting public monies for these showcase white elephants.  

But I think the real story behind this pandemic phenomenon -- that Covid-19 is really a Russian invention -- out to sabotage the IOC, has yet to be told!!  ;)

Did you take your meds this morning? :rolleyes::rolleyes:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I do find it weird though that mega cities, like Paris, dont have a world class aquatic centre or velodrome....or a sports mad city like Brisbane not having a decent 60,000 seat stadium. An advanced city should have a these facilities..Ok I agree white water stadiums and bobsled tracks are a bit niche!

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7 minutes ago, avensiss said:

I do find it weird though that mega cities, like Paris, dont have a world class aquatic centre or velodrome....or a sports mad city like Brisbane not having a decent 60,000 seat stadium. An advanced city should have a these facilities..Ok I agree white water stadiums and bobsled tracks are a bit niche!

What is a "world class aquatic centre" anyway?  Having an Olympic-sized pool and ancillary facilities is something many cities can build, but there's very little use to put thousands of seats in that venue considering how little that would get used.  But it's interesting to note this is a thing... Flushing Meadows Natatorium

That was going to be the water polo venue for the New York's 2012 Olympic bid.  It got built anyway and opened in 2008.

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11 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

What is a "world class aquatic centre" anyway?  Having an Olympic-sized pool and ancillary facilities is something many cities can build, but there's very little use to put thousands of seats in that venue considering how little that would get used.  But it's interesting to note this is a thing... Flushing Meadows Natatorium

That was going to be the water polo venue for the New York's 2012 Olympic bid.  It got built anyway and opened in 2008.

Ah, brings back memories of when I first moved to NYC in the early 1970s.  I first lived in the Flushing-Bayside area.  That natatorium, of course, wasn't even on the drawing boards then.  

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2 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

Ah, brings back memories of when I first moved to NYC in the early 1970s.  I first lived in the Flushing-Bayside area.  That natatorium, of course, wasn't even on the drawing boards then.  

I've said it many times on here.. a lot of infrastructure projects got spurred on by the 2012 bid that might not have happened otherwise.  So there was some value in that effort and what it led to, even though it didn't result in the Olympics coming here

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