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BidWeek: Why Salt Lake City Will Almost Certainly Host The 2034 Winter Olympics

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BidWeek, Reporting From Toronto, Canada –  This week, gears were set into motion that will lead to Salt Lake City being elected to host the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in 2034. Not in 2030. Not even with a bid, per se. The athletes of the world will be invited to Salt Lake City, Utah […]

The post BidWeek: Why Salt Lake City Will Almost Certainly Host The 2034 Winter Olympics appeared first on GamesBids.com.

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The IOC seems now to be rushing for only bids from super safe countries for both Summer and Winter Games - USA/Canada/ UK/ France/ Germany (referendums?) / Spain/ Italy/ China/ Japan/ Korea and Australia. No new frontiers, no controversy, long lead times etc...it is a smaller and smaller pool of bidders.

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Plus, locking in these cities now, sort of restores a semblance of the continental rotation scenario which has suffered a bit too much from the "Asian flu" of 2018-2020-2022! 

I wonder if the mascot for Beijing 2022 will be called Coronafefe-22??  B)

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On 2/15/2020 at 3:22 PM, TorchbearerSydney said:

The IOC seems now to be rushing for only bids from super safe countries for both Summer and Winter Games - USA/Canada/ UK/ France/ Germany (referendums?) / Spain/ Italy/ China/ Japan/ Korea and Australia. No new frontiers, no controversy, long lead times etc...it is a smaller and smaller pool of bidders.

As the disastrous financial costs of the Montreal games of 1976 became clear to the world, there was only 1 bid for 1984 and 2 for 1988.  But after Los Angeles hosted in 1984 without incurring debts it became fashionable to bid again. The same thing may happen again after affordable Olympics in Paris and Los Angeles.

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On 2/17/2020 at 9:22 AM, Nacre said:

As the disastrous financial costs of the Montreal games of 1976 became clear to the world, there was only 1 bid for 1984 and 2 for 1988.  But after Los Angeles hosted in 1984 without incurring debts it became fashionable to bid again. The same thing may happen again after affordable Olympics in Paris and Los Angeles.

I see a big difference though between the bidding climate today and that of 40 years ago. In addition to social media, the Great Recession led to a wave of economic populism throughout the western world with a renewed conscious about how tax money would be spent. and based on the numerous referendums that have said no to Olympic bids, that's the driving force the IOC hasn't quite figured out. Could a successful Olympics in Paris and Los Angeles help? Definitely but part of that criteria for success will be if those Games than stay on budget and deliver some sort of surplus or break even. The WOGs are practically on life support after the last two races, and Milan-Cortina has the potential to get very expensive quickly with all the new venues they need (I still think when those costs start coming out you will see CONI beg Turin to rejoin as was the original plan). Salt Lake City and to an extent Sapporo offer the IOC essentially what Paris and Los Angeles offer, a reasonable lower-cost bid. The question is whether or not that will be enough to skeptical tax paying citizens that the Olympics can be a worthwhile investment.

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