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Coates again eyes IOC vice-presidency

April 30, 2020 — 1.10pm

Source: The Age newspaper:  https://www.theage.com.au/sport/coates-again-eyes-ioc-vice-presidency-20200430-p54omj.html

John Coates wants to return to the International Olympic Committee vice-presidency at a decisive time for Queensland's bid to host the 2032 Games.

The Australian powerbroker hopes to return to an IOC vice-presidency for a term until after the 2024 Paris Olympics – a period vital to south-east Queensland's pitch to become an Olympic host.

Coates was on the IOC executive board from 2009 and a vice-president from 2013 to 2017.

Under IOC rules executives who have served eight years must stand down for three years. That period has expired for Coates, who has nominated to return as an IOC vice-president.

"I'm a candidate for the vice-presidency ... and that comes up whenever the IOC next meet," Coates said.

"I hope to be elected. That will take me through as a vice-president through to the Paris Games [in 2024]."

The IOC vote for fresh executives was to have been held at the Tokyo Games this July. But those Olympics have been postponed until next year because of the global coronavirus pandemic.

Should Coates be elected as one of four IOC vice-presidents, he will be perfectly placed to drive support for south-east Queensland's bid to host the 2032 Games.

The host city will be announced by 2025 at the latest, with bids expected from Germany, India, Spain and jointly, South and North Korea, among others.

Coates said Queensland's bid – encompassing Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast – was well advanced.

"You have got to always respect your competitors, but it is a good bid – it's very good," Coates said.

The IOC recently altered protocols to reduce costs of bidding, and hosting, an Olympics.

Termed 'the new norm', the changes encouraged potential hosts to use existing sports infrastructure wherever possible.

The Queensland bid estimated costs of staging the Games at $5.3 billion, which will be offset by the IOC providing a minimum $2.5b contribution.

"It wouldn't work financially but for the IOC's new norm," Coates said.

"About 85 per cent of the venues are there.

"And we can now have a single [athletes] village on the Gold Coast and one on the northern side of Brisbane.

"That would enable the athletes to be living, on average, about 20 minutes from their venues so it's a good solution for the athletes and it's made possible by the changes the IOC has made.

"There will be other candidates. But this is a good bid."

Coates will become the longest-serving president of the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) when his tenure soon extends to 30 years.

He turns 70 two days before the AOC's annual meeting on May 9.

Sir Harold Alderson – coincidentally, a rower like Coates – was AOC chair from 1944-73.

The postponement of the Tokyo Games automatically extended Coates' term as president by a year, to May 2022.

And at the looming general meeting, he's expected to be appointed as an honorary life president of the AOC, a permanent position without voting powers.

"The passion is still there," Coates said.

"You reflect on the [AOC's] centenary and all the athletes who have provided the wonderful performances over that last century, even going back earlier to [Australia's first Olympian Edwin] Flack.

"If you couldn't be inspired by helping produce the next generation of those athletes, there is something wrong with you."

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QSAC Is too old for such a thing. They proposed to expand it to 90,000 for the 1992 bid, but how that was ever going to achieved was questionable (though I'm sure the bid team would have made a scale

... and yet neither Melbourne, nor any other Australian city or region is making any moves toward a bid.  So let go of Melbourne,  they’re not bidding. End of story.  I’m a Melbourne resident and

As a Brisbane based politics nut even i struggle to see where this is going. Sure the north and west traditionally vote conservative, but it;s the city seats where the election is won, and given whats

Brisbane's new billion-dollar airport runway finishes without fanfare

By Tony Moore, The Brisbane Times,   April 30, 2020 — 7.17pm

Source: https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/brisbane-s-new-billion-dollar-airport-runway-finishes-without-fanfare-20200430-p54orc.html

COVID-19 restrictions meant Brisbane Airport’s billion-dollar new parallel runway was completed on Wednesday very, very quietly after eight years of construction.

There was no ceremony, no champagne and very few people present to mark the significant state milestone.

The runway is one of Brisbane's biggest infrastructure improvements, but sadly, it is unlikely that planes will arrive or depart before its official opening on July 12 because of COVID-19 restrictions on domestic and international flights.

The new runway will slowly double Brisbane Airport's passenger numbers from 23.4 million in the 2018-19 financial year to more than 50 million by 2040.

That will increase Brisbane’s daily flights at the new airport to about 110 aircraft movements an hour, putting the airport in the same league as Singapore's.

After eight years of construction – including reclaiming 11 million cubic metres of sand from Moreton Bay – the project partners marked its conclusion.

Brisbane Airport's new parallel runway by the numbers

  • It is 3.3 kilometres long.
  • Three hundred and twenty-four different subcontractors were engaged during the project.
  • 90 per cent of these contractors were based in south-east Queensland.
  •  They worked 3.3 million man-hours.
  • The new runway cost $1.1 billion, a saving of $200 million on initial estimates.

These included Brisbane Airport Corporation and Skyway, a joint venture between BMD Constructions Pty Ltd and CPB Contractors Pty Ltd.

BAC chief executive Gert-Jan de Graaff recognised that the lengthy construction process actually began 15 years ago.

"Today is a culmination of eight years of physical construction, many years before that in planning, and foresight from nearly half a century ago to build an airport with the growth capacity to meet the aspirations of the city and the state," he said.

He said the new runway was a catalyst for change in Brisbane.

"This new runway is so much more than asphalt," he said. "It is an enabler for recovery and growth across all facets of business, with an estimated 7800 new jobs created by 2035 and an additional $5 billion in annual economic benefit to the region," he said.

"Now more than ever it is crucial that we have the infrastructure and mechanisms in place to allow our great city and state to recover from the COVID-19 global pandemic, and Brisbane Airport and this new runway will play a strong part in that."

Skyway's joint venture project director, Graeme Fenemore, said the project was a significant engineering feat that involved reclaiming land from Moreton Bay.

"I am extremely proud to be handing over Brisbane’s new runway ahead of program, on budget, and with an exemplary safety record of zero lost-time injuries," he said.

It will now be tested by air traffic controllers, fire crews, operational crews and lighting experts before it opens on Sunday, July 12.

A planned public open day has been cancelled.

Mr de Graaff said while Wednesday marked the end of construction on the project, it was just the beginning for Brisbane Airport.

"In many respects, this runway is symbolic of the very firm belief we have that aircraft will, in the not too distant future, return to the skies, and our terminals will once again be full of happy people looking forward to visiting their families, having holidays or travelling to do business," he said.

"The last few months have been difficult for everyone in the aviation and travel industries, as well as the whole community, but we have never lost sight of the fact that this project has been built for the long term. It will serve us well for many decades to come."

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From my research, here are some venues that could be used for the games (not including the main Olympic Stadium)

Brisbane

The Gabba

Suncorp Stadium

Queensland Tennis Centre

Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Anna Meares Velodrome

Ballymore Stadium

Courier Mail Piazza

Brisbane Aquatics Centre

Hibiscus Stadium

Belmont Shooting Range

Queensland State Athletics Stadium

State Hockey Centre

Brisbane Entertainment Centre

Nissan Arena

Chandler Arena

Sleeman Sports Complex

Brisbane Showgrounds

Brisbane Exhibition Ground

Sleeman BMX Track

Wattle Creek Equestrian Centre

Holloway Field

Brisbane City Hall

Auchenflower Stadium

South Pine Sports Complex

Kangaroo Point

Southbank Parklands

Minnipi Parklands

The New Brisbane Live Arena

Gold Coast

Carrara Stadium

Robina Stadium

Carrara Indoor Stadium

Gold Coast Sports and Leisure Centre

Gold Coast Aquatics Centre

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

Coomera Indoor Sports Stadium

Gold Coast Hockey Centre

Village Roadshow Studios

Southport Broadwater Parklands

Nerang Bike Trail

Broadbeach Beachfront

Currumbin Beachfront

Burleigh Beachfront

Royal Pines Golf Course

The New Gold Coast Arena

Sunshine Coast

Sunshine Coast Stadium

University of Sunshine Coast Arena

Lake Kawana

Noosa Heads

Bokarina Beachfront

Ipswich

North Ipswich Reserve

The Springfield Reserve

Other

Moreton Bay Sports Complex, Moreton Bay

Manly Boat Harbour, Moreton Bay

Redcliffe Stadium, Redcliffe

Logan Metro Centre, Logan

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12 hours ago, Victorian said:

From my research, here are some venues that could be used for the games (not including the main Olympic Stadium)

Brisbane

The Gabba

Suncorp Stadium

Queensland Tennis Centre

Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre

Anna Meares Velodrome

Ballymore Stadium

Courier Mail Piazza

Brisbane Aquatics Centre

Hibiscus Stadium

Belmont Shooting Range

Queensland State Athletics Stadium

State Hockey Centre

Brisbane Entertainment Centre

Nissan Arena

Chandler Arena

Sleeman Sports Complex

Brisbane Showgrounds

Brisbane Exhibition Ground

Sleeman BMX Track

Wattle Creek Equestrian Centre

Holloway Field

Brisbane City Hall

Auchenflower Stadium

South Pine Sports Complex

Kangaroo Point

Southbank Parklands

Minnipi Parklands

The New Brisbane Live Arena

Gold Coast

Carrara Stadium

Robina Stadium

Carrara Indoor Stadium

Gold Coast Sports and Leisure Centre

Gold Coast Aquatics Centre

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

Coomera Indoor Sports Stadium

Gold Coast Hockey Centre

Village Roadshow Studios

Southport Broadwater Parklands

Nerang Bike Trail

Broadbeach Beachfront

Currumbin Beachfront

Burleigh Beachfront

Royal Pines Golf Course

The New Gold Coast Arena

Sunshine Coast

Sunshine Coast Stadium

University of Sunshine Coast Arena

Lake Kawana

Noosa Heads

Bokarina Beachfront

Ipswich

North Ipswich Reserve

The Springfield Reserve

Other

Moreton Bay Sports Complex, Moreton Bay

Manly Boat Harbour, Moreton Bay

Redcliffe Stadium, Redcliffe

Logan Metro Centre, Logan

Excellent.

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Gold Coast to play 'key role' in Queensland's 2032 Olympic bid, Australian Olympic Committee chief says

Posted 22 April 2020
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-22/australia-olympics-boss-says-gold-coast-key-to-queensland-bid/12169718
 
The head of the Australian Olympic Committee, John Coates, said the Gold Coast has a key role to play in south-east Queensland's bid for the 2032 Olympic Games after re-joining the region's Council of Mayors.

Gold Coast Council has voted to return to the local government advocacy group after a seven-year hiatus, bolstering its hosting rights push.

"It's got so much to offer and I'm very pleased to see they've come on board," Mr Coates said.

"It has existing venues and that's a massive priority for the IOC (International Olympic Committee) these days.

"While we haven't finally settled on all of the best locations for all of the Olympic and Paralympic venues, obviously there will be many based on the Gold Coast.

"It's very important that the Mayor of the Gold Coast be part of the team."

Proven hosting record

After hosting the 2018 Commonwealth Games, the Gold Coast is already home to many of the sporting and accommodation facilities needed to host Olympic and Paralympic games.

The city's sporting credentials are expected to be further boosted ahead of the postponed Tokyo Games as a training centre for Australian teams.

"For many of them, Queensland is looking more and more attractive as a lead into Tokyo too — rather than travelling to Europe or preparing in other prefectures in Japan," Mr Coates said.

"Sports such as surfing on the beach would just be a wonderful promotion for the Olympic movement — more importantly for Gold Coast and south-east Queensland."

Hefty price tag

Re-joining the SEQ Council of Mayors comes with a price-tag of more than $280,000, but Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate said it would help ensure the city attracted its 'fair share' of funding.

"The moving forward of the 2032 bid for Olympics, my opinion on that, is it is an infrastructure play for south-east Queensland," he said.

“We've got to be at the table to make sure that the priorities on the Gold Coast — whether it be heavy rail to the airport, light rail, the second M1, the Coomera bypass, and other infrastructure — is not left behind.”

"If you're not at the table, it's very easy to carve it up and become more Brisbane-centric, and as you know the Premier said this is more of a Queensland games."

SEQ Council of Mayors chair and Brisbane Lord Mayor, Adrian Schrinner, said the Gold Coast's involvement strengthened the organisation's lobbying powers.

"The City of Gold Coast is the second-largest council in Queensland, so having them back in the tent will bring a massive boost to our Commonwealth and State advocacy efforts and delivery of region-shaping projects," he said.

"More than ever, south-east Queensland councils will need to stand strong together and secure the support needed from the state and federal governments to get our businesses and communities back on their feet.

"When the time is right, we believe the SEQ City Deal and a proposal for the 2032 Olympic Games will play an important role in the state's long-term tourism and economic recovery."

Key points:

  • After hosting the 2018 Commonwealth Games, the Gold Coast is already home to facilities needed to host Olympic and Paralympic games
  • Gold Coast has re-joined the SEQ Council of Mayors to shore-up its bidding credentials at a price-tag of more than $280,000
  • Its mayor has joined the Premier in positioning the 2032 bid as more of a Queensland games and not Brisbane-centric.
 
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Brisbane Olympic Games Could Deliver State $36bn

Credit:    Dinah Lewis Boucherwed, 12 Feb 20:  “The Urban Developer “

https://theurbandeveloper.com/articles/brisbane-olympic-games

Queensland expects to see a $36.2 billion boost in tourism, jobs and exports should it secure the winning bid for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Releasing its ‘blueprint’ for hosting the 2032 Olympics, the state government touts economic benefits “in the billions of dollars and jobs” across the next 20 years. 

The cost of running the games is slated at $4.5 billion. 

But this cost is said to be significantly offset, with the report stating “at no cost to the State” taking into account International Olympic Committee funding of $2.5 billion, along with sponsorships and ticket sales revenue. 

“The analysis has determined that hosting a Games in 2032 is feasible, with the support of all three levels of government, and that the benefits outweigh the costs,” notes the value proposition assessment blueprint.

To date, Albion Park and the neighbouring Allan Border Oval are the frontrunner sites for the main venue. 

The analysis notes that approximately 80 per cent of event venues needed for the games already exist.

The report identifies $36.2bn in benefits to the state:

  • $8.6 billion in increased export opportunities;

  • Economic benefits of $7.4 billion;

  • $20.2 billion in international tourist spending.


Olympic venues?

Up to 43 Queensland venue options are identified, 18 are located outside of Brisbane, with Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk adding that she is “determined to include the whole state in the Olympic Games”. 

The final venue number will be dependent on hosting strategies for football, basketball and volleyball preliminaries.

The games would be held over three venue 'hubs – Brisbane, the Gold and Sunshine Coasts, with regional locations still being explored. 

Regional options include football preliminaries in Toowoomba, Townsville and Cairns as well as Keel Boat Sailing in the Whitsundays.

Should Brisbane be successful in its bid, the report specifies the preferred dates for the Olympic Games as running from Friday 23 July to Sunday 8 August 2032. 

The Paralympic Games would run from Tuesday 24 August to Sunday 5 September 2032.

But for now, the IOC is not expected to announce a winner until between 2022 and 2025.

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Australia is due to host the 2030 Pan Pacific Championships due to the rotation system between the main four nations. This would be fitting to be held in Brisbane as a lead up to the 2032 Olympics.

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Reign Coates: Extension could become life term for AOC president

Credit:  Sydney Morning Herald,  By Roy Masters.     April 17, 2020 — 3.30pm

Citius, Altius, Fortuitous.

When John Dowling Coates, chairman of the Co-ordination Committee of the Tokyo Olympics, was party to the IOC decision to postpone the 2020 Games because of the COVID-19 pandemic, he providentially provided himself with another year as president of the Australian Olympic Committee.

AOC by-laws state that the positions of president, vice president and the seven-member executive of the national Olympic body, become vacant in the year following a Summer Games, meaning that with the Tokyo Olympics now opening in July 2021, Coates and his team have a year’s extension to their terms.

Documents published by the AOC late on Friday point to the constitution rendering this fait accompli at an AGM, to be held via teleconference, on May 9.

 

Coates will have served 32 years as president when he finishes, earning him a bronze medal in the classification for long-serving presidents of national Olympic committees, behind only Raymond Ibata of the Congo and Uruguay’s Julio Maglione, who doubles as boss of world swimming.

However, the AOC AGM will also consider a motion by four-times Water Polo Olympian and past vice president, Peter Montgomery, to make provision for a potential honorary life president.

While the position won’t be filled now, a president who has served 13 years (three standard terms plus one year), will be eligible. Guess who it’s likely to be?

Insofar as Coates turns 70 two days before the AGM and finishes as executive president in early May 2022, the position of honorary life president could see him ruling the movement in his dotage.

Well, the truth is he wouldn't be able to vote at AOC meetings, but tell anyone who has sat around a board table with Coates (as I did for half my 23 years on the Australian Sports Commission) and they’ll conjure up a warlord in a wheelchair, knees covered by black and white tartan rug, steering the course, like the rowing cox he once was.

He won’t be the first HLP. That honour was bestowed on Sydney Broadway Grange, who was chair from 1977 to 1985.

Nor is Coates currently the longest-serving president/chair of the AOC, or its predecessor, the Australian Olympic Federation.

Sir Harold Alderson, a rower like Coates, was chair from 1944-73, (coinciding with former Prime Minister Bob Menzies' role as AOF President), meaning Coates will overtake Sir Harold’s term later this year.

November may also see him re-elected IOC vice president, filling one of the two vacant positions for four years, coinciding with the end of his IOC tenure.

He is already chairman of the Tokyo Games and president of the world’s peak sport court, the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

He has long been considered the right hand man of IOC president, Thomas Bach, an urbane diplomat. Coates, who can bare his teeth and spit expletives, is therefore the bite to the IOC’s Bach.

He has outlasted incumbent Sport Australia chair, Melbourne businessman John Wylie who signalled his own retirement for November. Their relationship never recovered from the bitter 2017 AOC election when former gold-medal winning Hockeyroo, Danni Roche, opposed Coates.

Some delegates may have voted him one more term, believing it was his last, but South East Queensland’s candidacy for the 2032 Summer Olympics, with the decision to be made as early as 2023, means Coates’ IOC position will be pivotal.

But it’s not as if he has neglected his AOC role. The annual report points to a solid financial position over these past four years.

The Australian Olympic Foundation, which controls the AOC investments, shows net assets of $150.879 million at December 31, 2018 increased to $171.415m at December 31, 2019, after distribution of $6.25m to the AOC.

Net assets at March 31 are $151.848m, reflecting the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, a decrease of only 11.9 per cent, compared to the ASX accumulation index falling 23%.

With $11.94m in cash, the AOC is in a position to make a distribution to athletes, without selling off funds in a depressed market.

While fiercely protective of the AOC’s financial independence of government, Coates has been a long-term lobbyist of government directing funds to athletes.

It’s not as though the politicians haven’t been acknowledged, with Prime Minister John Howard awarded the Gold Collar of the Olympic Order for his role in the success of the 2000 Sydney Games. Coates has the same gong but so, too, does former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. Another despot, Uday Hussein, elder son of Iraq’s Saddam, was president of the Iraq Olympic Committee.

Uday was known to torture Olympic athletes in cells beneath the palace, while the prisoners Coates takes are exclusively of the administrative kind.

Still, he could not resist the quip, when Uday was killed by American troops in 2003: “It’s a sad day for national Olympic presidents around the world.”

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AOC insists opportunity knocks for Australia's 2032 Olympic bid

Credit:  Brisbane Times

By Phil Lutton.    May 9, 2020 — 4.30pm

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/sport/aoc-insists-opportunity-knocks-for-australia-s-2032-olympic-bid-20200509-p54rep.html

Australia should know whether it is hosting another Olympic Games by 2022, with John Coates urging governments to supercharge the 2032 bid with an economic blitz on the way out of the COVID-19 downturn.

The Australian Olympic Committee president told the annual general meeting on Saturday that the economic stall caused by the coronavirus should be seen as an opportunity for the 2032 bid to regather some steam by the Queensland and federal governments.

A South East Queensland bid, with Brisbane at its heart but venues throughout the region, remains the leading contender for 2032 and Coates said the chance had arrived to add the transport infrastructure needed to ensure the region could handle the influx of athletes and visitors.

Under the revised bidding process, Coates said there was "continuous dialogue" with the IOC's Future Host Commission, which tracks the progress of bidding cities and updates them along the way, rather than a grand reveal after a vote.

The AOC has backed the Brisbane bid under the caveat that transport links are upgraded, which was already needed in the rapidly growing region.

"This is the opportunity. We always were going to be using existing venues, largely, so it depended on getting the improved rail and infrastructure. Now there is a real need for that road and rail investment to turn the economy around," Coates said.

"My discussions, certainly at a federal level last week, indicated that. We have stepped back for the moment, there are other priorities at the moment. It was hardly the right time to be pushing it but in the meantime, we’ve been doing the masterplanning, location of the venues, and when they are ready we will elevate the discussion with the IOC."

Turning to future "opportunity", Coates told the meeting, which was held online, that the proposal for Australia to host the summer Olympics for the third time in 2032 was gathering pace.

Coates told the AGM that the goals for the economy and Games bid were aligned and that a decision could be made by 2022, giving the state a decade to prepare the way for what would be Australia's first Games in 32 years.

"I have always believed in making necessity a virtue. There is already a need for jobs and growth in the Queensland economy arising from the impact of COVID-19," he told the meeting.

"Our (government partners) recognise a potential 2032 ... Games as a critical part of the state and nation's economic recovery in the short term, quite apart from all of the long-term health, well-being, economic and sporting legacies."

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It's very premature for Coates to be talking about a Queensland Olympics being the catalyst to recharge the economy after the COVID19 pandemic. We're only scratching the tip of the iceberg in terms of the widespread economic damage that's going to result from this. I've mentioned in other threads about the prospect not just of a global recession (that's a given) but a second great depression and that would make Olympic bids a tough sell in countries who are hard hit with high unemployment rates.  On the other hand, yes, Australia has done a better job than many others in terms of controlling the outbreak (I see where Morrison  announced a three phase plan to lift restrictions). The question remains how bad will the economic situation get especially with China's threats over Australia's calls for an investigation into the COVID19 origins in China.

All that said, 2032 is a ways away giving Australia more of a cushion in terms of economic recovery than say Italy and Milan in 2026 and perhaps because Australia took decisive action early then the economic fallout will be mitigated. 

On another note, I'll be curious to see when a preliminary venue plan is released (one besides the possibilities in the feasibility study).

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9 hours ago, stryker said:

It's very premature for Coates to be talking about a Queensland Olympics being the catalyst to recharge the economy after the COVID19 pandemic. We're only scratching the tip of the iceberg in terms of the widespread economic damage that's going to result from this. I've mentioned in other threads about the prospect not just of a global recession (that's a given) but a second great depression and that would make Olympic bids a tough sell in countries who are hard hit with high unemployment rates.  On the other hand, yes, Australia has done a better job than many others in terms of controlling the outbreak (I see where Morrison  announced a three phase plan to lift restrictions). The question remains how bad will the economic situation get especially with China's threats over Australia's calls for an investigation into the COVID19 origins in China.

All that said, 2032 is a ways away giving Australia more of a cushion in terms of economic recovery than say Italy and Milan in 2026 and perhaps because Australia took decisive action early then the economic fallout will be mitigated. 

On another note, I'll be curious to see when a preliminary venue plan is released (one besides the possibilities in the feasibility study).

I think John Coates is being quite sensible as an infrastructure blitz and the huge jobs and economic boost to Queensland would be economically and politically a huge positive.

John Coates is also talking about this construction blitz “on the way out” of the pandemic, not waiting till after it.

In recent years, big transport and infrastructure projects (eg new metro rail lines, cross-city tunnels, extensive freeway and highway road widening projects, new light rail lines, etc) have been very sensible economically and currently hugely politically popular for the State Governments of Brisbane, Perth, Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne.

 Australia is also now well into a new and exciting mineral resources mining boom era on the same scale which ignited the economy a decade ago.  Throughout Covid-19, this resources boom has left the pandemic in it’s wake and continued unabated with increasingly busy schedule of Fly-in/Fly-out flights to various booming mining projects without interruption, particularly in Western Australia.

As you mentioned, a few months ago Australia jumped very early on to Covid-19 through the National Cabinet process which saw the State Premiers form a daily National Cabinet with the Prime Minister to discuss and swiftly enact and legislate consistent border closures and enforcement of strict social restrictions, as well as a variety of economic stiumulus packages including the Job Keeper payment of $1500 per fortnight per employee to enable employers to retain staff which have been stood down.

The Covid-19 curve has well and truly been flattened in Australia and there is no talk here or economic assessment that new ‘Depression’ is likely here.  At the time of this post, Covid-19 deaths in Australia is 97 and also very low in our close neighbour New Zealand.

There is also a Queensland State Election this October and so the timing of these big  jobs announcements through a transport and infrastructure blitz of the type promoted by John Coates are timely and will be carefully managed.

 

 

 

  

 

 

he 2032 Games are still 12 years away but the Host is likely to be selected by 2022. He is actually talking about  a construction I think it’s quite visionary and sensible actually 

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12 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

 

the 2032 Games are still 12 years away but the Host is likely to be selected by 2022. He is actually talking about  a construction I think it’s quite visionary and sensible actually 

Fully Agree. A big event the whole community can build towards and get around might just be what the economy needs. 2032 in Brisbane would be something that we could look forward to, and be used to do some big projects that would make brisbane a better place to live.

 

My only concern is that i can see politicians being scared of even talking about hosting the games with the current economic situation of high unemployment given i can see people thinking "why are we spending billions to host the olympics when so many people are out of work" not thinking about the jobs that would come out of an olypic games

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oh and just to add onto the above. if all levels of government are really are on board i would think Brisbane would almost be dead certs to get this now, given how we have managed covid and it looks like we are though the worst of it with minimal deaths and infection rates into the single digits a day now, where as places like India and indonesia are still struggling to contain the virus

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Australia is a safe pick in these times..and sadly epidemiologists are predicting global pandemics more regularly in the future...

Australia is spending (ie wasting) $100 billion plus on new submarines, and $100 billion plus on new strike fighters at the moment. So I never wont to here that we cant afford 3-5 billion for the Olympics!

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Tunnelling has begun for Brisbane's new underground railway

Credit: The Brisbane Times

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/tunnelling-has-begun-for-brisbane-s-new-underground-railway-20200514-p54szo.html

By Lydia Lynch, May 14, 2020 — 4.10pm

 

Tunnelling has officially begun on the Cross River Rail, one of the largest infrastructure project in Queensland's history.

A tunnelling machine has been assembled at the bottom of an 18-metre-deep shaft below Roma Street Station and will excavate about 50 tonnes of rock and soil each hour.

The machine will dig twin tunnels to run from Roma Street to Woolloongabba, underneath the Brisbane River.

The tunnelling site is covered by an enormous "acoustic shed" designed to minimise noise and contain dust.

Next door to the tunnelling site, the Hotel Jen is being pulled down at a rate of one floor each week.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk inspected the site on Thursday.

“Above ground, demolition has also been underway for several months at the site of the new station – but today is a huge milestone for this project as we start tunnelling for the first time,” she said.

“This is just the beginning of the underground works, with 5.9 kilometres of twin tunnels and four underground stations to be excavated in total."

Both buses and trains will arrive at Roma Street Station underground once the project is complete.

Once Cross River Rail is operational, 36,000 passengers were expected to use Roma Street every day to transfer between buses and trains.

Cross River Rail Minister Kate Jones said the start of tunnelling signified the beginning of a new phase of the project.

“Coronavirus has had a huge impact on our economy. But we won’t let it derail Queensland’s largest infrastructure project," she said.

“We’re not only building a new train station and digging tunnels, Cross River Rail will also generate billions of dollars of new private sector investment in the city as we redesign the precinct around the new station."

Cross River Rail will cost about $5.4 billion to build and will be finished in 2024.
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Brisbane International Cruise Terminal Nearing Completion

From:  https://www.portbris.com.au/cruise/

Port of Brisbane

“The new, world-class $177 million Brisbane International Cruise Terminal is due to open later in 2020 and around 180 cruise ships are scheduled to call during its first season in 2020/21.”

“The new cruise terminal been designed to cater for the biggest cruise ships in the world and give passengers a world-class experience. It will become a gateway to the richness of our region, helping to showcase all that south-east Queensland has to offer, and a vital pillar of Brisbane and Queensland’s tourism economy.”

“It will also deliver a major, long-term economic and tourism boost. Within 20 years, it will potentially triple Brisbane’s cruise industry to:

  • support 3,750 jobs

  • bring over 760,000 visitors annually

  • contribute $1.3 billion in net expenditure into the Brisbane economy.”

————

From: https://www.ship-technology.com/projects/brisbane-international-cruise-terminal/

The new Brisbane International Cruise Terminal (BICT) is being built at Brisbane port in Queensland, Australia and will be located at Luggage Point on the northern side of the Brisbane River.

The new cruise ship facility will be able to accommodate the world’s biggest cruise ships. It will become a gateway to the south-east and offer regional economic and tourism opportunities.

The project is being carried out by Port of Brisbane with an estimated investment of A$158m ($113.8m).

The need for a new international cruise terminal has been identified as 62% of cruise ships in the Australian market are expected to have a length of more than 270m by 2020.

The Port of Brisbane received approval from the state government to construct the new international terminal in October 2017.

Construction started in mid-2018 and is scheduled for completion in 2020.

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BRISBANE METRO DUE TO OPEN IN 2023

https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/traffic-and-transport/public-transport/brisbane-metro/about-brisbane-metro

The first stage of Brisbane Metro is underway and will provide a 21 kilometre service connecting 18 stations along dedicated busways between Eight Mile Plains and Roma Street, and Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and University of Queensland. All of Brisbane will benefit from a greater transport network, with easy links between Metro, bus and train services.

Brisbane Metro will be a key part of Brisbane’s greater transport network connecting the city to the suburbs. New high-capacity and high-frequency Metro services will run along dedicated busways and link with suburban bus and train services as part of a better planned network.

Brisbane Metro was announced in early 2016 to address congestion bottlenecks in the city and constraints on the bus network. Along with meeting the demand for frequent and reliable travel to the city.

In May 2017, Council released the Brisbane Metro Business Case. This followed a 12 month detailed assessment of the benefits, costs and impacts of delivering the project.

In March 2018, the project was confirmed and remains a high priority project on the Infrastructure Australia Priority List.

The draft Design Report released in April 2018, describes the construction and operation of Brisbane Metro in detail. The report was available for consultation:

  • on Council’s Your Say community engagement website
  • at community information sessions
  • at briefings with key stakeholders.

In September 2018, Council released the Brisbane Metro draft Design Report Consultation Outcomes document. This document provides a summary of key feedback themes identified through consultation and Council's response.

The expected cost to build Brisbane Metro is $944 million. Council has committed to fund $644 million of the project’s capital cost. The Australian Government has provided a $300 million funding commitment in the 2018-19 Federal Budget.

Key elements

Infrastructure

  • a new underground Cultural Centre station and surface improvements in the Queensland Cultural Precinct
  • Victoria Bridge converted into a ‘green’ bridge with improved public and active transport outcomes
  • a new tunnel under Adelaide Street and surface improvements in-line with the Adelaide Street Vision
  • modifications and upgrades to existing busway stations
  • a new depot facility for the Metro vehicle fleet

Metro vehicle

  • a new fleet of 60 electric Metro vehicles , following successful testing of the pilot vehicle
  • zero tailpipe emissions
  • all day electric operation with flash charging at end of route
  • capacity for 150 passengers in comfort and 180 in event mode
  • in-built USB charging points and on-board WiFi
  • three spacious passenger compartments and four large doors for quicker boarding
  • fully low floor design, providing a high level of accessibility
  • interior illuminated ceiling

System

  • dynamic vehicle bay allocation system
  • real-time vehicle location and travel updates
  • passenger information displays

Policy and operations

  • all door alighting and boarding
  • reduced vehicle dwell times

Network and services

  • two new Metro lines
  • Metro servicing 18 stations
  • interchange at 11 locations
  • complement Cross River Rail with interchanges at Boggo Road station and Roma Street station

Timeline

Key milestones in the development of Brisbane Metro.

Brisbane Metro estimated timeline.
2017 Business Case released
March 2018 Brisbane Metro added to the Infrastructure Australia Priority List
April 2018 Draft Design Report released 
May 2018 $300 million Australian Government commitment 
June 2018 Project construction fully funded
July 2018 Procurement commenced 
September 2018 Draft Design Report consultation outcomes released
November 2019 Metro vehicle design and build tenderer approved
2019-2023 Early works, detailed design and construction of infrastructure
2023 Metro services commence

 

 

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GOLD COAST LIGHT RAIL STAGE 3A

From: https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/traffic-and-transport/public-transport/brisbane-metro/about-brisbane-metro

“In November 2019 it was announced the $709 million Stage 3A extension to Burleigh Heads would be delivered with commitments of $269 million from the Australian Government and $91.5 million from City of Gold Coast, with the balance of funds committed by the Queensland Government.”

“GCLR Stage 3A involves a 6.7km extension of the light rail system from Broadbeach South to Burleigh Heads, including eight new stations and the procurement of additional light rail vehicles (LRVs).“

———————————-

From: http://www.goldlinq.com.au/stage3A

“The Gold Coast light rail system has been planned to be delivered in a number of stages to respond to the growth of the Gold Coast. Stage 3A will expand the tram network to 27 kilometres from Helensvale to Burleigh Heads.”

“GCLR is the largest transport infrastructure project ever undertaken on the Gold Coast and it was designed to be delivered in stages in response to the city's forecast population growth. Following on from successful delivery and operation of Stages 1 and 2, the third stage of the project involves a southern extension from Broadbeach South to Burleigh Heads.”

“Stage 3A includes 6.7 km of new dual-track light rail running from Broadbeach South Station to Burleigh Heads, eight new light rail stations and additional light rail vehicles (LRVs). It will also include an upgrade and expansion of the existing depot and stabling facilities, a new light rail-bus interchange at Burleigh Heads and Miami and supporting works and improvements, including signalised traffic intersections and upgrades, new signalised pedestrian crossings and upgraded pedestrian and cycle facilities.”

“Light rail has proven incredibly successful on the Gold Coast with more than 46 million paid passenger trips to date and passenger numbers increasing 33 percent when the Stage 2 extension opened.

Stage 3A key features include: 
stage3overview.png

 

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GOLD COAST OCEAN-SIDE CRUISE SHIP TERMINAL

From: https://infrastructurepipeline.org/project/gold-coast-ocean---side-cruise-ship-terminal/

Construction commencing 2022

The proposed Port of Gold Coast – Ocean-side Cruise Ship Terminal is designed to cater for cruise ships typically operating around Australia as well as the world’s largest cruise ship vessels.

Key features:
- jetty structure extending approximately 950 m offshore from Philip Park,
- wharf structure including mooring and berthing facilities for cruise ships and passenger platform,
- offshore breakwater structure approximately 780 m in length to protect berthing cruise ships and terminal infrastructure from ocean swell,
- cruise ship terminal and landside facilities,
- short term passenger drop-off areas and staff only long-term parking facilities.

Expected construction start date: 2022.

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GOLD SUNSHINE COAST AIRPORT EXPANSION

Due for completion: 2020

From:  https://www.airport-technology.com/projects/sunshine-coast-international-airport-expansion/

The airport expansion includes the construction of a new runway, two runway end taxiway loops and navigations aids, apron expansion, phased terminal expansion, and a new air traffic control tower and associated utilities.

The major component of the expansion project is the construction of a new runway that would become the main runway of the airport with a change in orientation from the existing runways.

Opened in the 1960s, runway 18/36 has been serving the region for more than five decades. According to the 2007 Sunshine Coast Airport Master Plan, it was, however, identified that the relatively smaller dimensions (1,797m x 30m) of the runway were limiting the airport’s growth in terms of passenger numbers, destination and freight capacity.

To overcome the barrier, a plan to develop a new, fully-complaint runway was proposed and the same was adopted by the Council. The EIS of the project, which was concluded in July 2016, approved the proposal supporting the construction of the runway and associated facilities.

The new runway, designated 13/31, will be 2,450m-long and 45m-wide and will be aligned in south-east/north-west direction. It will intersect the existing runway slightly at the north. It will be able to handle larger aircraft such as Airbus A330 and Boeing 777 and 787 and will be complaint with all CASA and international standards. To be operational by 2020, the runway will be served by the existing terminal.

Successful implementation of the project would lead to the closure of the existing secondary runway, 12/30, and the limit the services at runway 18/36, for a small percentage of general aviation. It will also relocate the navigational aids and revise flight paths.

 

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TERMINAL EXPANSION AT GOLD COAST AIRPORT

10 March, 2020

From:  https://infrastructuremagazine.com.au/2020/03/10/gold-coast-terminal-expansion-appoints-local-contractors/

Due to open in 2021.

Gold Coast Airport’s $200 million terminal expansion project is well underway, with 10 local Queensland businesses engaged as subcontractors. Their contribution has injected more than $35 million into the local economy.

Managed by Lendlease, the 10 trade packages include work such as concreting, fencing, roofing and formwork – essential elements contributing to the expansion.

The local businesses working on the project are: Neumann Steel, Havendeen Constructions, ATF Services Gold Coast Fencing, LCE Queensland, Jensen Bowers, Orbitz, East Coast Concrete, Heinrich Constructions, Suez and Unique Portable Kitchens.

Lendlease Building General Manager, Brad Protheroe, said the awarding of contracts to Gold Coast businesses further supported Lendlease’s commitment to ensuring project expenditure was directly injected into the local economy. 

“With the support of Gold Coast Airport, we have developed a Local Industry Capability Plan for the terminal expansion project that not only identifies subcontract, employment and training opportunities, but also ensures that wherever possible, the project spend is directed into the local economy,” he said.

“In the first 10 months since turning the first sod, we have awarded more than $35 million in contracts to 10 local businesses.

“In addition, we have inducted more than 850 workers onsite, demonstrating the sheer size of the workforce required to get to where we are today.” 

Queensland Airports Limited Executive General Manager Infrastructure and Property, Carl Bruhn, said he was pleased with the project’s progress to date and the involvement of local companies.

“We are pleased with the progress of the terminal expansion project, with the ground floor slab completed and the building on track to ‘top out’ by the middle of this year and open by mid-2021,” he said.

———

From:  https://blog.plantminer.com.au/faqs-about-the-newly-approved-gold-coast-airport-expansion

The key aspects of Project LIFT at Gold Coast Airport include:

  • Expansion and redevelopment of the existing terminal building
  • Five additional aircraft parking stands with associated taxiways
  • Improvements to ground transport facilities
  • Site preparation, including drainage, earthworks and clearing.

 

 

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SUNSHINE COAST MASS TRANSIT PROJECT

From: https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Council/Planning-and-Projects/Major-Regional-Projects/Sunshine-Coast-Mass-Transit-Project

28 Feb, 2020

- Light Rail Lines, and
- Bus Rapid Transit options.

Completion of Preliminary Business Case: 2020
Completion of Final Business Case: 2021

“Sunshine Coast Council has continued to build its case for the development of an integrated mass transit system to service the Sunshine Coast’s growing population.”

“The strategic business case for mass transit was approved by council in 2019, and council is completing the next phase: a preliminary business case which is to be finalised by mid-2020.”

“On completion of the preliminary business case, council will set up a joint process with the Queensland Government to complete the final detailed business case by 2021.”

“PwC proposed three options for stage one of the mass transit solution should be taken forward to full analysis of benefits and costs in the final preliminary business case:

-> An upgrade of bus lanes on the sides of the major roads with new specially branded buses to provide a “Quality Bus Corridor.

-> A bus rapid transit system much like light rail but with electric buses up to 25 metres long.

-> A light rail system with 45 metres long trams running in their own right of way mostly in the centre of the major roads.”

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