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2 hours ago, Roger87 said:

I confirm this thread has become promotion tour lol.


Kindly allow me to bring you up to speed ....

The topics in this thread are  ....

   .....   wait for it ....  its a big suprise ....

all things Brisbane/SEQ 2032.

All ok now?

 

 

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       Potential Olympic Stadium Locations

 

Current Capacity

Future Capacity

 

Public Transport Accessibility

 

Albion Park

Albion

(3.1km from Brisbane City)

 

-

Plenty of space for a new stadium

 

Train and Bus

(Bowen  Hills Train Station 1.4km away)

 

THE GABBA

Woolangabba

(3.1km from Brisbane City)

 

 

 

42,000

Restricted space for expansion of current stadium  footprint

Train and Bus

(New Cross River Train Line under construction will have an underground station at the Gabba)

 

Mayne Rail Complex

Bowen Hills

(3.5km from Brisbane City)

 

-

Plenty of space for a new stadium

 

Train and Bus.

(Exhibition Train Station 210m away)

 

QSAC (QEII) Stadium

Nathan

(13km from Brisbane City)

 

48,500

 

 

Can be increased to 60,000 with temporary seating

 

Bus

(Banoon Train Station 3km away)

 

Brisbane Showgrounds

Bowen Hills

(3.1km from Brisbane City)

 

 

 

-

 

 

Plenty of space for a new stadium

 

Train and Bus

(Exhibition Train Station at this venue)

 

 

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5 hours ago, BigVic said:

QSAC could be upgraded to serve as the main stadium for ceremonies as well as athletics and football finals 

Yes, absolutely it could.  The issue with QSAC is not the much longer distance from the city, but the lack of a metro train line close by.  The closest train station is 3kms or 1.86 miles away. Bussing in all spectators is possible, but not desirable.

Apparently a new stadium on the Albion Park site (closer to the city) is favourite but a new station closer to it will likely need to be built. The closest train station is 1.4kms or 0.86 miles away.

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IOC VP Coates Says India Is Out Of 2032 Olympic Bid Race

Posted on Feb 5, 2020 7:20 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids

India has abandoned its bid to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032, International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President John Coates said Tuesday.

Speaking on 4BC News Talk Radio in Australia, Coates, who also serves as President of the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC), sized up the emerging bid race that is currently being dominated by a strong campaign from Queensland state and capital Brisbane.

“India was looking at it but they are looking now at the Youth Olympic Games,” Coates said.

An IOC spokesperson later rebutted Coates remarks in a statement to GamesBids.com, explaining “the Indian Olympic Association continues to be in dialogue with the IOC over the possible hosting future Olympic Games.”

Projects engaged in talks with the IOC’s Future Host Commissions are in the pipeline for all upcoming Olympic editions, so India’s dialogue could put a bid in line for 2032 – but also 2036 and beyond.

President of India’s National Olympic Committee Narinder Batra last year laid out an aggressive hosting plan leading towards a possible 2032 Games.

Last June he said “we are looking at 2026 Youth Olympic Games, and the IOC Congress in 2021 …  we have also expressed our interest to host the 2030 Asian Games so that the infrastructure will be ready early and it will just be a two-year gap to the Olympics.”

According to Coates’ comments India has continued to show interest in the Youth Olympics.  But with the possibility that the 2032 Games will be awarded before the end of next year, time is running out for that edition.

Coates is appropriately backing his Australian project and is also the architect behind the new IOC bid process that dropped many of the formalities – including submission deadlines.

Coates, outlining the other potential candidates, said “the Vice President of Indonesia has put in a letter.”

“The Koreans say they’d like a joint bid with South and North Korea.

“That’s it.

“There was some talk about 12 cities from north Germany having a look but that hasn’t eventuated.”

Both Shanghai in China and a project from Spain have been named in the past as possible bidders, but no serious discussions with the IOC have emerged.

Earlier this week reports in the Netherlands suggested Dutch Olympians and businesses were preparing a bid proposal to present to the government.

To date, Queensland is the only bid to have launched an official dialogue with the IOC and expects to submit a formal bid by July.  It is perceived to be the front runner in this race, but there is no set election timetable.  IOC sources have said that the winning city will be chosen “when the timing is right.”

Queensland has recently faced opposition from the right-wing populist One Nation party who have launched a billboard campaign and circulated a petition to have the matter debated in Parliament.

Coates rejected One Nation claims that the potential Games will cost AUD $12 billion and will likely go over budget.

He said “the studies [One Nation leader Pauline Hanson] cites are old, the IOC now has a different approach to hosting the Games.

“We will adapt to a city rather than having the city adapt to us.”

Coates insists that with the large promised IOC cash injection, the Games will be cost-neutral and without a need for taxpayer contributions.

Tokyo will host the Games in July this year.  Paris is scheduled to host in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028.

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Coates hits back at Hanson campaign to derail Queensland bid for 2032 Olympics

Credit: By Duncan Mackay, Wednesday 5 February 2020 https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1090142/coates-hits-back-at-pauline-hanson

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President John Coates has rubbished a campaign started by controversial politician Pauline Hanson to try to scupper Queensland's bid for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, claiming that the event will not cost the taxpayer any money and could even make a profit.

Hanson, leader of right-wing populist political party One Nation, claimed last month the State Government should be focusing on providing water to regional areas rather than spending money on an Olympic bid. 

She claimed local citizens did not want "spending tens of billions on stadiums and entertainment centres across Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast" and would rather see the money allocated to drought-proofing Queensland. 

She launched a series of billboards across the state plastered with the message "2032 Brisbane Olympics, regional Queensland says NO".

But Coates, in an editorial published in The Courier-Mail newspaper in Brisbane, has claimed Hanson does not understand the new funding model adopted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

"They are not just changes, more a revolution in the way the Olympic Games are run," he writes.

"Known as 'The New Norm', these changes have made Games much cheaper to run, while delivering benefits that can last 20 years and beyond."

The IOC are expected to contribute up to $2.5 billion (£1.9 billion/€2.3 billion) towards hosting the Games in 2032.

"When you add revenue from national sponsors and ticket sales the operating costs of the Games themselves will not require any contribution from taxpayers or ratepayers," Coates, a senior member of the IOC who helped draw up the new strategy, writes.

"These game-changing benefits weren't available to previous Olympic hosts.

"The IOC wants Olympic hosts to use existing venues as much as possible, reduce venue sizes and ensure the Games fit in with Queensland, not the other way round.

"In the case of Brisbane and Queensland's candidature, we already have 85 per cent of the venues in place or planned.

"Any investment in further sports facilities and transport infrastructure is already required to cater for the state's growing population."

A feasibility study commissioned by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has put the cost of staging the Games at AUD$5.3 billion (£2.8 billion/$3.7 billion/€3.3 billion). 

The Games are seen as potentially being a major catalyst for helping upgrade Queensland's infrastructure system, which is currently struggling to cope with the number of motorists and passengers on public transport.

“We know the Games will be so much more than the eyes of the world on Queensland for two weeks of the world's greatest sports event," Coates writes.

"The benefits start 10 years before the Games period and will last for another 10 years to follow.

"And those benefits will flow throughout Queensland.

"Tourism, small to medium businesses supplying the Games, pre-Games training camps, construction and other jobs, plus the enormous boost to sport in Australia.

"Sport will be supercharged.

"Today's 10-year-old child will be an optimistic 22-year-old in 2032, with real job opportunities, actively involved in sport and living in a thriving state with a vibrant economy."

Hanson responded to Coates' editorial by urging people to sign a petition demanding time is set aside in Parliament to "debate the irresponsible Brisbane Olympics bid because we all know Queensland can't afford it!"

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Coates hoping to use Lausanne 2020 to promote Queensland bid for 2032 Olympics

Credit:  By Duncan Mackay,  7 January 2020 https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1088837/coates-promoting-2032-olympic-bid

Queensland's campaign to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games is set to move into a new, potentially significant, stage here this week when Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President John Coates presents its bid to leading officials.

 

Coates plans to meet with International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach during the Winter Youth Olympic Games to inform him of recent progress after Queensland's Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk confirmed last month they would endorse a bid.

It reinforced Australia's position as favourite in a race that is being run under new rules after the IOC scrapped the policy of awarding the Games seven years before they are due to take place.

Under new bid rules, they could now be awarded as early as next year if the IOC believe they have a suitable candidate, although Coates told insidethegames he believes 2022 is a more realistic target.

Coates will, though, seek to speak to the IOC’s Future Summer Host Commission, headed by Norway's Kristin Kloster Aasen, to try to establish what the timetable will be.

"I’ll hopefully have the opportunity to talk to the President about the potential for a Brisbane candidature now it’s official, and to have it moved from what the IOC calls a continuous dialogue phase to a targeted dialogue phase," Coates told Brisbane newspaper The Sunday Mail.

"And I hope to interface with the Future Host Commission and talk to them about our plans."

Coates reportedly hopes that Queensland can submit a formal bid document by June 30 so it is lodged before the start of Tokyo 2020 on July 24. 

Among the documentation he plans to hand over to the IOC here is a 30-page summary of the feasibility study commissioned by the Queensland Government before they committed to supporting the bid. 

Like many other parts of Australia, Queensland has been badly hit by bushfires. 

At its peak last month, almost 70 fires were burning across Queensland but it has not affected the area as much as New South Wales and Victoria. 

But the State has continued to make preparations for its Olympic campaign and is expecting to officially appoint a bid team in the next few weeks. 

Along with representatives from the AOC, Australian Paralympic Committee and the Australian and Queensland Governments, a number of former top athletes are expected to be appointed to the Bid Committee.

These could include Olympic gold medallists Cathy Freeman, who lit the Cauldron at the Opening Ceremony the last time Australia staged the Games at Sydney in 2000, Susie O’Neill, Natalie Cook and Cate Campbell.

There could also be a place, The Sunday Mail reported, for Olympic swimming silver and bronze medallist Mark Stockwell, now one of Queensland's most successful and richest property developers. 

In 2011, Stockwell led the Gold Coast's successful bid for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, which has proved to be the catalyst for this Olympic campaign.

Also expected to add business expertise is Katie Page, the chief executive of retailer Havery Norman and backer of several professional sports in Australia.

A place is also set to be found for John O’Neill, the former chief executive of the Australian Rugby Union and Football Federation Australia, and who is now the chairman of the Star Entertainment Group, one of Australia's largest gaming and entertainment groups.

Under Coates, Queensland's bid seems to have stolen a march on its rivals, which could include Germany, India and Indonesia. 

A joint North and South Korea bid now seems unlikely after political tensions increased between Pyongyang and Washington, D.C. 

Saint Petersburg had also been planning to bid but could be barred from putting forward a candidature under a series of punishments proposed by the World Anti-Doping Agency against the Russian Anti-Doping Agency after data transferred from the Moscow Laboratory was allegedly manipulated. 

 

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

Yes, absolutely it could.  The issue with QSAC is not the much longer distance from the city, but the lack of a metro train line close by.  The closest train station is 3kms or 1.86 miles away. Bussing in all spectators is possible, but not desirable.

Apparently a new stadium on the Albion Park site (closer to the city) is favourite but a new station closer to it will likely need to be built. The closest train station is 1.4kms or 0.86 miles away.

QSAC Is too old for such a thing. They proposed to expand it to 90,000 for the 1992 bid, but how that was ever going to achieved was questionable (though I'm sure the bid team would have made a scale model on how they were going to achieve this).

I'd expect a new stadium, somewhere near public transport and easy accessibility. It can be downsized post Olympics if need be, provided that no one wants to become a tenant.

That's the Achilles heel of the bid. The main stadium is going to take a huge chunk of the budget, even if you get privatize the construction of the Athletes' Village and Media Village.

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BidWeek: Is India’s 2032 Olympic Bid In, Or Out? Why Transparency Matters With New IOC Process

Posted on Feb 7, 2020 3:44 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids, Rob's BidBlog

BidWeek – Reporting From Toronto, Canada – When information is scarce, a single sentence can be amplified exponentially – and mean different things.

That’s what happened this week when Australian radio presenter Ben Fordham asked International Olympic Committee (IOC) Vice President John Coates to list the potential rivals to the 2032 Olympic Games bid from Australia’s Queensland State.

Coates answered by telling a news radio audience in Australia “the Vice President of Indonesia has put in a letter.”

“The Koreans say they’d like a joint bid with South and North Korea.

Then he added matter-of-factly “India was looking at it but they are looking now at the Youth Olympic Games,” before adding “that’s it.”

If that final sentence seems innocent enough, then you will need some further context.

John Coates is a hard-working IOC member who wears many hats in the Olympic world.  He is Vice President of the IOC with access to a lot of privileged information that is not in the public domain.  In that role he worked diligently to reform the Olympic site selection process, spearheading a group that last year launched significant changes aimed at lowering hosting costs and eliminating potential ‘losers’ .

In addition, he is President of the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) and has become a key functional advocate for Queensland’s bid to host the Olympic Games.

So, when asked about the bid – live on Australian radio – which hat was he wearing?  It was probably an awkward moment for him.

Leading up to his comments about potential opponents for 2032, he spoke in defense of Queensland as it faces attacks from a domestic political party.  The fringe right-wing One Nation Party has launched a petition to end the bid, claiming costs will soar and taxpayers won’t be able to afford to pay for the Games.

In the same vein, he then responded to the follow-up question about other countries that may be pursuing bids.  Clearly, his answer was designed to downplay hurdles that the Queensland bid could face on the international stage – elevating the opportunity that is available to Australians.  Coates later added a dismissal of a possible German bid, explaining that it “hasn’t eventuated.”

Coates was speaking as President of the AOC, brushing the other bids to the side.

But here’s the problem.  The new IOC bid process, in part designed by Coates, eliminates many formalities.  There are no longer deadlines or milestones when applicants and candidates are expressly named.  Interested National Olympic Committees now enter a dialogue with the IOC at any time – and may lose interest at any time – without any announcement.

The IOC has said that it could name a city it wants to include in a “targeted dialog” at any time – meaning they’ll focus on this city with the intent to have it elected at an IOC Session.  They also say they will select the city “when the timing is right.”

When the President of the AOC says India has moved away from an Olympic bid and is now looking at a Youth Olympic Games bid, it can be taken lightly and with the understanding that it might be rhetoric by a rival who may not have all the details.

But when the IOC Vice President says the same – it’s big news, especially for stakeholders and the public in India.  It’s de facto official.

Indian Olympic Association (IOA) President Narinder Batra said Wednesday, the same day, “we want to bid for 2032 Olympics,” while describing a medal-winning strategy to increase India’s haul ahead of the Tokyo, Paris and Los Angeles Olympics.

India made its official bid announcement on December 30.

If an IOC Vice President, especially one who is closely connected with the bid process, says India has moved on – we have to believe that is the shared opinion of the IOC.

It wasn’t.  After GamesBids.com reported the news Wednesday, the IOC was quick to contact us about the discrepancy.

An IOC spokesperson rebutted Coates’ remarks in a statement to GamesBids.comexplaining “the Indian Olympic Association continues to be in dialogue with the IOC over the possible hosting future Olympic Games.”

So what’s really going on?  Was Coates simply pandering to an Australian audience, forgetting that online radio has an international scope?

“India was looking at it but they are looking now at the Youth Olympic Games.” – IOC Vice President John Coates

Was it a Freudian slip, with Coates knowing from an IOC perspective that India is not being considered as a legitimate contender, and it’s the IOC that is pandering to India and its dream of hosting the Games?

Now we can only guess.  And that is not fair or transparent to the general public in Australia and India who need to know where their bids stand.

As I’ve written in this space before, I believe the new bid process will help the IOC make better strategic decisions when siting the Olympic Games that will benefit both the IOC and the hosts – and the Olympic Movement.  I’ve also written about the risks of this new process that will be cloaked in darkness and lacking in transparency.

In the past the IOC was good at withholding comments about cities that were considering bids – keeping any information confidential until the big announcement was made on application deadline day.  It was fair and left the conversation in the hands of those interested in bidding.  Observers knew nothing was official until it was… official.

The list of contenders was clearly documented, and their evaluation and standing after the final all-members vote was clear.  Anomalous remarks could be checked against the official line.

But the new process is inherently ambiguous, and any words made by officials in or out of context can be construed as fact.

Further muddying the situation is the conflict of an IOC Executive who is also the architect of the new bid process and now the champion of the Queensland 2032 Olympic bid.  Unfortunately this multi-role mentality is not uncommon in the international sporting world, and is generally accepted.

That makes it even more imperative to step up the transparency of the new Olympic bid process.

The media in India were rightfully confused by that single sentence spoken on Wednesday.  Those in Australia were mislead.

But it will get even more difficult from here when some cities make the final lap of the process while others are disqualified.  They’ll wonder; what really happened behind the curtains?

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Queensland Olympics 2032 would create jobs and cash injection, government says

Credit:  Warren Barnsley ,  7 News Tuesday, 11 February 2020 5:14 pm

https://7news.com.au/news/qld/queensland-olympics-2032-would-create-jobs-and-cash-injection-government-says--c-691980

The Queensland government has shrugged off criticism of its 2032 Olympics push, touting hundreds of thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of economic benefits.

The state government has released its Value Proposition Assessment of hosting the Olympic and Paralympics Games in Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast.

It claims $7.4 billion of quantifiable economic benefits have been identified, with the games creating 130,000 jobs.

“In addition to direct jobs, there will be tens of thousands of indirect jobs supported by the Games including over 10,000 tourism induced jobs in the Games year alone,” said the report, released on Tuesday.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the games would be “jobs bonanza for all of Queensland, not just Brisbane”.

“We’re taking it very seriously,” she said.

“The economic benefits to the state are great.”

One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has led the backlash leader to Queensland hosting the Olympics, labelling the push “irresponsible”.

“We’re in dire straits in Queensland - the state government is in a $90 billion debt, we have townships running out of water,” the Queensland senator said last month.

But the report claims the cost of hosting the games, estimated to be $4.45 billion, could be delivered at “no cost to the state, taking into account International Olympic Committee contributions and domestic revenues”.

 

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Key Findings

of Value Proposition Assessment

Credit:  State Government of Queensland

https://www.premiers.qld.gov.au/publications/categories/reports/assets/2032-olympic-paralympic-games-vpa.pdf

  • Hosting the 2032 Games is feasible with financial and operational services support from all three levels of government.
  • Organising Committee costs for the Olympic and Paralympic Games of $4.45 billion could be delivered at no cost to the State, taking into account International Olympic Committee (IOC) contributions and domestic revenues.
  • The quantifiable economic benefits for Queensland have been estimated at around $7.4 billion. In addition, there are a range of qualitative social and community benefits that the Games could deliver over a potential two-decade window of opportunity.
  • The Games could have a positive impact on job creation, supporting around 130,000 direct jobs. In addition to direct jobs, there will be tens of thousands of indirect jobs supported by the Games including over 10,000 tourism induced jobs in the Games year alone.
  • The tourism and trade opportunities the Games could deliver are significant. This includes an estimated uplift of around $20.2 billion in international visitor expenditure between 2020 and 2036 and increased export opportunities of up to $8.6 billion.
  • In addition to whole-of-State benefits, regions outside of South East Queensland (SEQ) could also benefit from a range of opportunities, including:

         -       Games hosting opportunities (Cairns, Townsville and the Whitsundays)

         -       pre-Games training, Torch Relay and cultural festivals

         -       increased visitor expenditure with around 50 per cent of international travellers

                 dispersing to the regions (an uplift of approximately $10 billion) procurement and

                 supply chain opportunities.

  •  A high percentage of Games venues - approximately 80 per cent - already exist or can be delivered through temporary overlay solutions. A number of options, aligned with long term sport and entertainment venue planning in Brisbane, continue to be explored for the Athletics and Ceremonies venue.
  •  Queensland’s climate and world-class facilities provide an ideal environment for elite athletes to train and perform at their best.
  •  The recent Olympic Agenda 2020, New Norm reforms provide a basis for Queensland to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in a way which reduces costs and ensures flexibility in delivery to the benefit of the host.
  • The 2032 Games and the SEQ City Deal currently under development provide a catalytic opportunity for all three levels of Government to agree on key priorities including transport infrastructure projects.
  • The next stage involves finalising the master plan, securing funding and operational service agreements with all levels of government and confirming the associated costs to the State.

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Brisbane Olympic bid is our chance to stop funding decline: Coates

Credit:  By Georgina Robinson, February 19, 2020 — 4.56pm

Brisbane Times:  https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/sport/rugby-union/brisbane-olympic-bid-is-our-chance-to-stop-funding-decline-coates-20200219-p542ee.html

 

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates says a successful bid to host the 2032 Olympics would be the "whack" required to reverse a long-term slide in funding for Olympic sports.

Coates said the obesity epidemic was also a strong argument for continued government funding of Olympic sports, but the veteran AOC boss acknowledged there was nothing like a home Games to capture the attention of politicians.

"It's the whack, no doubt about that, and that's something the Prime Minister acknowledges and would be ready for," he said.

"I think there is still a justification for increasing funding based on the health and wellbeing of an active nation and all of those things ... government has to address obesity and other health issues ... and that's a message that the AOC keeps impressing upon them."

Coates was speaking at the launch of Think Again, the memoir of Australia's first and only deaf Olympic decathlete Dean Barton-Smith, who competed at the Barcelona Olympics in 1992.

Coronavirus and fresh revelations of looming funding cuts dominated proceedings, with Coates sparking a fresh war of words with long-time rival and Australian Sports Commission chief John Wylie.

The Australian Institute of Sport, which falls under Wylie's remit, has been in meetings with national sporting organisations about the future structure of high performance funding, with Australia's three-time gold medal-winning Hockeyroos one of the most high-profile teams under a funding cloud post-Tokyo.

Government funding of high-performance sport has declined by 12 per cent in real terms since 2010 during a time in which Australia's results on the world stage have stuttered.

Australia claimed a record 58 medals and finished fourth overall at the Sydney Olympics in 2000 but the nation has slowly slid down the ranks and settled for 10th at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro.

In 2018 more than 40 current and former Australian athletes signed an open letter warning "high performance will inevitably transform into mediocrity" if sports are starved of Australian government funding, and AOC chief executive Matt Carroll followed up with calls for an extra $60 million each year.

In the past three years the federal government has invested a total of $60 million in Tokyo preparations, while in last year's budget a further $54 million over two years was allocated to emerging high performance athlete pathways and athlete wellbeing and engagement.

Neither Coates nor Wylie believe it is enough, but recent reporting on the cuts prompted Wylie to issue a public plea for unity and silence on the issue so close to the Games.

Coates rejected the appeal, saying the issue deserved attention at any time in the Olympic cycle.

"They seem to me to like mutterings of a man who has relevance deprivation, coming up with just six months to go," Coates said. "We've been critical of the fact that sports have had their funding reduced, we're critical of the funding criteria being just medals. Whether the government can redirect some money - I read that there's a pool of money there for the final run-up to Tokyo - so I hope that's wisely spent.

"The difference I have with John Wylie in his piece is saying 'let's not talk about this til after the Games'. You need to be putting this to bed during this cycle so that you go straight into the next cycle and you don't lose six months. That's where I very much disagree with him and I've made that clear."

The Queensland Government gave the go-ahead to a 2032 southeast Queensland bid late last year, and it must now develop a "candidature file" with its bid details, which would be presented to the IOC before the Tokyo Games next year.

Coates reflected on Prime Minister Scott Morrison's pledge last year that the Government would not only support an Australian bid but build a long-term strategy around it.

"We had a meeting on the side of [the G20] with our Prime Minister and Mathias Cormann and Prime Minister Morrison embraced the bid," Coates recalled.

"He said 'the Commonwealth's behind this' but he also looked at [IOC president Thomas] Bach and said 'this is an opportunity for us to now plan long term and do something about a proper structure for sport and support for sport."

Coates also said he was confident coronavirus posed no threat to the viability of the Tokyo Games.

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Assuming the money’s still there it makes their success even more inevitable - Australia looks to be having more success at combatting the evil germ than just about anywhere in the western world. I’d think the IOC should be looking at getting the deal done ASAP once the world’s back in action - secure the future of the Games & make sure there’s a good long recovery time before the next ‘bid process’. 

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On 4/11/2020 at 2:54 PM, yoshi said:

Assuming the money’s still there it makes their success even more inevitable - Australia looks to be having more success at combatting the evil germ than just about anywhere in the western world. I’d think the IOC should be looking at getting the deal done ASAP once the world’s back in action - secure the future of the Games & make sure there’s a good long recovery time before the next ‘bid process’. 

Right now with the current situation, I highly doubt the IOC is looking to lock up hosts for any future Olympics right now. Some are even questioning whether or not the postponed Tokyo Olympics will even be able to go through next year. With the added costs in the billions with the postponement, it also gives more ammunition to the No Olympics crowd.  Without a vaccine, I'd even venture to say Beijing 2022 is questionable. There's too many unknowns right now and the financial fallout (world recession is a given but some economists are even talking economic depression) probably puts bids, even from desirable locations, on the backburner right now.

Speaking of Australia, I read an article (can't remember the link) where it was said Australians may not be permitted to travel overseas until 2021. If that's the case, depending on how the virus progresses, I wonder if that could jeopardize Australia's participation in Tokyo next year.

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On 4/11/2020 at 8:54 PM, yoshi said:

Assuming the money’s still there it makes their success even more inevitable - Australia looks to be having more success at combatting the evil germ than just about anywhere in the western world. I’d think the IOC should be looking at getting the deal done ASAP once the world’s back in action - secure the future of the Games & make sure there’s a good long recovery time before the next ‘bid process’. 

Queensland just had it's first day with no new diagnosis of COVID-19 in 3 months. Qld and Australia in general are getting on top of this and i expect this would be something that the IOC would be looking at when deciding if they want to award the games to Queensland.  That of course hinges on if Queensland still wants it. I suspect as a queenslander myself there is a lot less support for an olympics now given the mass unemployment that we now have thanks to Corona

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45 minutes ago, Tejas57 said:

Queensland just had it's first day with no new diagnosis of COVID-19 in 3 months. Qld and Australia in general are getting on top of this and i expect this would be something that the IOC would be looking at when deciding if they want to award the games to Queensland.  That of course hinges on if Queensland still wants it. I suspect as a queenslander myself there is a lot less support for an olympics now given the mass unemployment that we now have thanks to Corona

The thing is that these games are still 12 years away so if people think we will still feel this effect in 12 years, they've got to be joking....

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The world in many ways is still feeling the effects of the financial crisis 12 years ago. This is not a joke.

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11 hours ago, StefanMUC said:

The world in many ways is still feeling the effects of the financial crisis 12 years ago. This is not a joke.

Couldn't agree more. A global recession is already here. A second great depression is a real possibility. When this is all over there's not going to be a quick bounce back the way some people think.

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This is in many ways worse than the Great Depression. 

1) Life still sent on during the 1930's despite the high unemployment. People went on vacations, restaurants were open, films were produced and people went out to cinemas, and so on. And during the world wars while many traditional business closed, there was massive demand for labor in the war effort and GDP actually grew worldwide during the war and in the post-war "golden age of capitalism". Voluntarily shutting down over a quarter of the economy is an unprecedented event in human history.

2) Political rancor is likely going to get worse as we have to choose between saving the lives of the elderly and infirm vs saving the economic future of the young and healthy.

Edited by Nacre

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CITY OF GOLD COAST TO REJOIN COUNCIL OF MAYORS TO BACK 2032 QUEENSLAND OLYMPICS BID

21 April, 2020

Source:  Australian Leisure Management

https://www.ausleisure.com.au/news/city-of-gold-coast-to-rejoin-council-of-mayors-to-back-2032-queensland-olympics-bid/

Gold Coast City Council has voted to re-join the South East Queensland Council of Mayors (SEQ) to back the region’s bid to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

With the Council having left the group back in 2013, Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate reversed the decision at the first Council meeting since being re-elected as Gold Coast Mayor for a third term in office.

Mayor Tate has previously offered his support for a South East Queensland bid for the Olympic and Paralympic Games, and last year pledged to offer venues which were used at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Having previously claimed the Council would not be offering finances to boost the project, the decision to re-join the SEQ will cost $284,200, according to myGC.com, with Tate saying the move would ensure Gold Coast can enjoy a bigger role within discussions over the 2032 Games.

Mayor Tate told myGC.com “if the Olympic bid does come together, we will want our fair share of the Games here in our city (as) we've got the infrastructure.

"(And) if there's surfing, obviously it should be here and not the Sunshine Coast.

"It's about making sure that the infrastructure, for instance heavy rail all the way to the airport, the next stage of the light rail, the second M1, all those things are top priority and that we're not put aside by a Brisbane-centric Council."

The SEQ welcomed the Gold Coast City Council 's decision, stressing that Gold Coast had always been an important part of South East Queensland and had continued to be part of plans, including for regional transport and the Olympic and Paralympic Games planning.

SEQ Chair Adrian Schrinner stated “the success of the Council of Mayors is based on Councils joining together to deliver better outcomes for the businesses and communities of South East Queensland.

"We're stronger together than we will ever be apart.

"The City of Gold Coast is the second largest Council in Queensland so having them back in the tent will bring a massive boost to our Commonwealth and State advocacy efforts and delivery of region-shaping projects.

"More than ever, South East Queensland Councils will need to stand strong together and secure the support needed from the State and Federal Governments to get our businesses and communities back on their feet.

"When the time is right, we believe the SEQ city deal and a proposal for the 2032 Olympic Games will play an important role in the state's long-term tourism and economic recovery.

"Mayor Tate was there when the SEQ Mayors first decided to pursue an Olympic Games proposal back in 2015, and it seems right to have the Gold Coast back on board to see this journey through."

Facilities used at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games are expected to be included in a Queensland Olympic bid

An independent political advocacy organisation, to represent the interests of South East Queensland, SEQ currently features members of 10 Councils in the region, with the GCCC set to take the number to 11 when it rejoins on 1st July.

The SEQ has commenced negotiations towards an SEQ city deal, delivered the region's first long term, multi-modal transport plan and secured support from the State and Commonwealth for its plan to secure the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032.

Queensland has emerged as the front-runner to host in 2032 in recent months and officially confirmed its bid in December.

A delegation including Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk received positive feedback from the International Olympic Committee (IOC) during a visit to Lausanne in September, and IOC President Thomas Bach has repeatedly talked up the candidacy from Australia.

A Queensland Government report published in February said the Games would generate huge income and jobs.

It was claimed the Games would come at "no cost" to Queensland, as the expected $4.45 billion costs would be offset by the IOC contribution of $2.5 billion, and revenues such as sponsorship and ticket sales.

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