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                                 BRISBANE/SEQ BID 2032

                               What Has Happened So Far

July 2016

Pre-feasibility Study of a potential South East Queensland bid for the 2028 Olympic Games

  • A Council of Mayors’ (SEQ) prefeasibility study released confirmed the region’s capability of successfully bidding for an Olympic Games, but recommended that further analysis be undertaken.
  • Based on this, eight SEQ councils voted to proceed with an Olympic Feasibility Study - Brisbane, Ipswich, Lockyer Valley, Redland, Scenic Rim, Somerset, Sunshine Coast and Toowoomba councils.

23 January 2019

SEQ People Mass Movement Study Released

  • SEQ Council of Mayors released the “SEQ People Mass Movement Study”, a comprehensive road map of 47 projects to avoid traffic gridlock and address the transport and congestion challenges facing South East Queensland.

21 February 2019

2032 SEQ Olympic and Paralympic Games Feasibility Study Released By COMSEQ

 

COMSEQ:  Council of Mayors of South East Queensland (COMSEQ)

 FAST FACTS

  • Delivering on a regional approach to the Games, the Indicative Master Plan outlines venues and major facilities across eight SEQ councils and delivering an average athlete travel time of 19 minutes.
  • Sixty percent of proposed venues already exist in SEQ, 30 percent are planned or identified as a future community need (irrespective of a Games), and ten percent are proposed as temporary.
  • While a site for the Olympic Stadium will require further analysis, the study has identified a future need for a smaller, rectangular stadium in Brisbane to supplement Suncorp Stadium.
  • This would be built as a 25,000 - 30,000 capacity stadium, allowing for temporary adaptation to increase the seating capacity to 55,000 at Games time.
  • Around 81,000 rooms would be required for an SEQ Games - IOC/Olympic Family (41,000), Workforce (15,000) and Visitors/Spectators (25,000).
  • The net operating cost for an SEQ Olympic and Paralympic Games would be $900 million, this is compared to a net operating cost for the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games of $1.2 billion.
  • The operational budget for an SEQ Games would be approximately $5.3 billion, which is offset by IOC contributions ($1.7 billion) and domestic revenue ($2.7 billion), resulting in a net cost of $900 million. 
  • The economic benefits of an SEQ Games would be significant. For example, the NSW Government reported a $20 billion economic uplift due to the Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic Games.
  • Proposed Games Dates for an SEQ 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games are Friday 13 to Sunday 29 August (Olympic Games) and Paralympic Games (Tuesday 5 to Sunday 17 October).

20 March 2019

SEQ People Mass Movement Study

 

  • The Study discussed at Brisbane Conference.
  • Identified a road map of 47 projects to accommodate the anticipated population growth of the region (regardless of a Games)
  •  This Study is a component of the SEQ Council of Mayors’ investigation into the feasibility of a South East Queensland bid for the 2032 Olympic Games. 

4 May 2019

 

 

 

IOC President Addresses Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) AGM

  • President Bach was the first IOC President to address the AOC’s AGM.  He also took questions from the floor and was asked about the prospects for a candidature by Brisbane for the Olympic Games 2032
  • He said, “It is at a pretty early stage but from what I have seen of the feasibility study it looks pretty impressive. They have taken account of the reforms of Olympic Agenda 2020 with no need for any large infrastructure projects and the use of many already existing venues.”

11 May 2019

IOC President Attends International ‘SportAccord’ Conference on the Gold Coast, Australia

 

  • IOC President Thomas Bach met with leadership of COMSEQ and business leaders prior to Sport Accord and with Qld Premier during Sport Accord. President Bach made complimentary remarks regarding Australia’s love of sport and capacity to host world-class events.
  • The event, held at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre, included representatives from 500 different international businesses, sports federations and rights holders.
  • SportAccord Managing Director Nis Hatt said it was clear how successful the event had been, stating “there is no doubt this has been the best SportAccord ever, with delegates from across the world extremely impressed not only by the facilities on offer in Queensland but the relaxed lifestyle and the beautiful scenery of the Gold Coast:
  •  “Many delegates have left the Gold Coast with the strong impression that Queensland is capable of hosting their future events and I’m sure we’ll start seeing the outcomes of the conversations had here in the weeks, months and years to come.”

June 2019

IOC Approves Further Changes to “New Norm” Processes

  • The International Olympic Committee (IOC) Session met in June 2019, approving further changes to its New Norm process designed to make bidding for and hosting Olympic Games cheaper and more flexible. 
  • Key changes were that potential hosts could come from multiple cities, regions and even countries, rather than a single city.
  • Also, a host city could also be selected earlier than seven years out from a Games, providing a potential decade or more lead-in to a Games.

13 June 2019

 

Queensland Opposition Leader Backs Bid for a Queensland Olympic Games

  • A future LNP government would back a bid to host the Olympic Games in south-east Queensland.
  • LNP leader Deb Frecklington said the opposition wanted Queensland to "go for gold". We are backing a bid for a Queensland Olympic Games," she said.
  • "The Games would supercharge our tourism industry, showcasing Queensland to the world.

29 June 2019

IOC President Meets With Australian Prime Minister at G20 Summit

 

  • During the G20 Summit, the IOC President held a bilateral meeting with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison.
  • The Prime Minister declared that his government fully supported a candidature from Queensland to host the Olympic Games 2032.
  • He also made it clear that the Olympic Games would fit into the government’s 10-year infrastructure planning.
  • At the meeting, the IOC President noted that this early commitment, and the well-known Australian enthusiasm for sport, were a great foundation for the Olympic Games 2032 in Queensland.
  • The President was accompanied by John Coates, IOC Member in Australia.

 

July 2019

IOC Funding:  Letter to Queensland Premier

 

  • The IOC wrote to the Premier advising that while it is too early to forecast the IOC contribution to the successful staging of the 2032 Olympic Games, any potential candidates should base their feasibilities and forecast budgeting on the USD1.8 billion IOC contribution to the operating budget of the LA2028 Organising Committee.

     

23 July 2019

 

Value Proposition Assessment

  • Premier Anastacia Palaszcuk establishes a Queensland Government Taskforce to examine the economic benefits and risks associated with Queensland hosting the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032.

 

8 August 2019

Inaugural Meeting of 2032 Olympic Candidature Leadership Group

(OCLG)

  • Held in Cairns, Queensland.
  • The first meeting of the OCLG, chaired by the Prime Minister, with leadership of Queensland Government, Council of Mayors South East Queensland and the Australian Olympic Committee affirming their commitment to exploring a candidature.
  • OCLG is the group charged with carrying a candidature forward to the IOC and meets monthly.

11 Sep 2019

Queensland Delegation Visits IOC HQ

 

  • A Queensland delegation led by Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk met IOC president Thomas Bach at the committee's headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.
  •  The delegation received a briefing from IOC staff on key aspects of the candidature process.
  • The meeting came as it was reported Brisbane would get a new stadium and upgraded transport links if the state gets the nod to host the 2032 Olympics.
  • Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates was part of the mission and called the briefing session "a successful and critical next step" in Queensland's push to host the Olympic Games in 2032.
  • The delegation included federal MPs Ted O'Brien and Milton Dick, Council of Mayors South East Queensland representative Mark Jamieson and Star Entertainment chair John O'Neill.

9 December 2019

 

Queensland Government Commits to Olympic Games Candidature

 

  • On December 9th 2019, Queensland Cabinet approved the decision to proceed with the candidature after considering a Value Proposition Assessment designed to assess the risks and opportunities of hosting the Games.

 

9 December 2019

AOC welcomes Queensland Government Commitment to 2032 Olympic Games candidature

  • The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) has welcomes announcement by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk that her government will pursue the opportunity to host the 2032 Olympic Games in Queensland.
  • “Quite rightly, this was not a decision to be taken in haste. However, we now have the Federal Government, the Queensland Government, the Council of Mayors South East Queensland (COMSEQ) and the AOC joined at the hip to take a Queensland candidature forward.
  • “We know the business community recognises the economic benefits that will flow, but it is vitally important that the community is kept fully informed.
  •  “Critical to that, is an understanding that hosting an Olympic Games these days is a very different beast. The days of the white elephant are gone thanks to sweeping changes made by the International Olympic Committee.”
  • “The New Norm changes announced in 2018 ensure future hosts use existing facilities or temporary facilities.
  • If there’s a lasting sport and community benefit, then new facilities can play a part, but the focus is on delivering a Games that is cost effective and flexible.
  • “And we learned this year that the IOC would contribute US$1.8 billion towards the operating costs of the Games effectively ensuring the Games would be cost-neutral”.

 

                              What Happens Now

Continuous Dialogue with IOC Future Host Commission

 

  • The Commission will inform the IOC Executive Board on which candidates should be seriously considered. Also the creation of a Queensland 2032 candidature entity to manage the candidature process reflecting the support of all levels of government, the community and business sectors.

 

Olympic Candidature File to be Presented to IOC Before Tokyo Olympic Games in July 2020 

  • AOC President, John Coates, said on 9 December 2019 that the OCLG  will work through governance arrangements and the next necessary steps in compiling a Candidature File which would be presented to the International Olympic Committee before the Tokyo Olympic Games in July 2020.

 

Executive Board recommends preferred candidate to IOC Session

 

  •  The IOC Executive Board consists of the IOC President, four Vice-Presidents and ten other IOC members including the Chair of the IOC Athlete’s Commission. It is elected by the full membership of the IOC
  •  It has general responsibility for the administration of the IOC and management of its affairs
  • The Executive Board will consider the report from the Future Host Commission before making a recommendation on the Preferred Host to the IOC Session.

 

IOC Session Votes on Games’ hosts

  • The IOC Session consists of all IOC Members.
  • They can hear presentations, ask questions and provide comments before a final decision is taken on who will host of the Olympic Games in 2032.

 

                                 IOC Events in 2020

9-22 January, 2020

Lausanne 2020 Winter Youth Olympic Games

3-5 March, 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting, Lausanne

19-24 April, 2020

SportAccord, Beijing

15-17 June, 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting, Lausanne

23 June, 2020

Olympic Day

18-19 July, 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting, Tokyo

21-22 July, 2020

IOC Session, Tokyo

22-23 July, 2020

Joint EB-ASOIF Meeting, Tokyo

24 July-9 August 2020

Tokyo Olympic Games

6-8 October, 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting, Lausanne

24-25 November, 2020

ANOC General Assembly, Seoul

8-10 December, 2020

IOC Executive Board Meeting, Lausanne

12 December, 2020

Olympic Summit, Lausanne

 

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, yoshi said:

How long would the process take between candidature file submission & executive board approval? 

That’s a good question. There are several IOC Executive Board Meetings this year before the IOC Session coinciding with Tokyo 2020.

We’ll have to wait and see how it pans out once the Candidature File is presented to the IOC.

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8 hours ago, Roger87 said:

This has been precisely the point of Stockholm 2026. And still they lost to a bid which needs a full process for constructing venues (including the main stadiums). Even some aspects of the Agenda 2020 has been in blury lones precisely for the lack of limits about the "adaptation of the city's needs".

"Brisbane and Australia has proven that it has what it takes to get this done. "

How? The only reference we have it's the feasibility study, which as we can verify in every race, this plan is adapted and on top of that, like Nacre said, the main venues are the most expensive to build.

Madrid can still spoil the party if they present the 2020 bid adapted. Jakarta is a non sense agreed. There's still 7 months to reconsider the race to say way behind. 

Refer next page on this thread re What Has Happened Already re Brisbane/SEQ’s Olympic Candidature, which really started in 2016.  A lot of key moments has already happened since which has propelled way, way ahead of any likely competitor.

That’s just the way it is, my Aussie bias aside.  Brisbane and SEQ have steadily surged way way ahead of any bidding competitors, no exaggeration.

What other prospective interested 2032 Host from the rest are close to submititing a Candidature File which, not only has quickly grasped the latest and additional IOC bidding changes passed mid-year 2019, and also enjoys has such high support from all levels of government, business and leading Queensland sporting identities?

The stark reality is for anyone else “hoping” to be 2032 Hosts, the gate may be shut tight if the IOC Executive Board recommends Brisvane’s Candidature for approval to the IOC Session in July this year.

If that happens, and it could as stated by the IOC President himself, then Brisbane/SEQ may be awarded the Games 12 years early to allow plenty of time to be Games ready in come 2032.

Incredulously, it really does seem at this moment in history, that the rest of the other 2032 interested cities have not grasped the reality of the latest New Norm IOC Bidding Changes which are only 6 months old. Maybe they’re still living in the past and think that the IOC is not going to elect a 2032 Host until 2025?   I don’t know but it just seems that way and they, Madrid and Indonesia included are now very very late.

 

 

 

 

 

will be a bittler lesson to Bri

Leaving my Aussie bias aside, I really cannot see Madrid or any other interested Olympic Host City or Region  being able to catch up to Brisbane

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Interesting that there’s nothing in 2021 in that calendar. Maybe they are planning on having everything done for rubber-stamping in July in Japan. 

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18 minutes ago, yoshi said:

Interesting that there’s nothing in 2021 in that calendar. Maybe they are planning on having everything done for rubber-stamping in July in Japan. 

Yes the IOC do not appear to have finalised their 2021 Key Dates as yet.

They were/are considering Athens, Greece, for the IOC Session in 2021.

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Lost Olympians Explored True Beauty of Sporting Ideals

By Roy Masters, Brisbane Times, January 19, 2020

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/sport/lost-olympians-explored-true-beauty-of-sporting-ideals-20200119-p53srv.html

After almost a century, two “lost Australian Olympians” – never acknowledged as representing their country – could be finally honoured on the world’s biggest sporting stage.

Ruby Reynolds-Lewis and James Quinn represented Australia at the 1924 Paris and 1932 Los Angeles Olympics, respectively, but have never been counted as competitors, despite the diligent record-keeping of the only nation other than Greece to have fielded a team at every modern Olympic Games.

All this will change if Brisbane wins the bid to host the 2032 Summer Olympics.

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates confirmed that Reynolds-Lewis and Quinn would be the inspiration of the cultural program of a “First Nations Exhibition”, open to entries of art and music from all National Olympic Committees, held in conjunction with a 2032 Olympics in south-east Queensland.

This should not imply Reynolds-Lewis and Quinn’s excision from history is because they were Indigenous. They were not. But they were non-sport competitors. Reynolds-Lewis entered in the 1924 Paris Olympics in the musical composition category and Quinn entered in the 1932 LA Games in the portrait painting category. At that time, arts and sport were both included in the Olympics. (It ended after the 1948 Games because it finally dawned on the IOC, obsessed with amateurism, that musicians and artists were being paid).

The resurrection of the two Olympians is the result of dedicated research by the son of an Olympian, John Treloar, whose father, also named John, was a finalist in the 100 metres at the 1952 Helsinki Games and is regarded as Australia’s greatest male sprinter.

Coates told the Herald:   “At the December 2019 meeting of the Brisbane 2032 candidature group, I tabled John Treloar’s paper about Ruby Reynolds-Lewis and James Quinn for consideration when we come to plan our cultural program.

"Any art exhibition, building on the significant works of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, could include a ‘First Nations Exhibition’, open to all National Olympic Committees. And similarly with music.

"Through a Brisbane 2032 art and music exhibition, we could finally acknowledge the contributions of Ruby Reynolds-Lewis and James Quinn to our rich Australian Olympic history."

From the 1912 Stockholm Olympics to the 1948 London Olympics, an arts competition was held alongside the sport events, with works in different categories to be directly inspired by the ideal of sport.

The founder of the modern Olympics, Frenchman Pierre de Coubertin, in his opening address to the conference that would organise the first Olympic art competitions, declared with typical pomposity that the Olympics would "reunite the Muscles and the Mind, once divorced, in the bonds of a legitimate marriage".

Ruby Reynolds-Lewis submitted her musical composition, Chasse à courre(Hunting with hounds) and was joined by six competitors from France, Belgium, Great Britain and Norway. The rules allowed the judges to decline to award a medal if the entries failed to meet their standards.

The 43 person jury in the music competition included world-class composers Bela Bartok, Maurice Ravel and Igor Stravinsky, so it’s not surprising none of the seven amateurs received a medal.

Quinn was an Australian portrait painter who studied under Frederick McCubbin, an accredited official war artist for the First AIF and painted the official portrait of Sir John Monash. At the Los Angles Games, Quinn entered two portraits in the open painting event along with 312 participants from 18 countries. One was of Stephen Fairbairn, an Australian-born rowing coach, best known for his rowing at Cambridge in the 1880s. The portrait hangs in Jesus College, Cambridge. The other portrait was of Sir Hubert Wilkins, an Australian arctic explorer. Both were unsuccessful.

Treloar, who is writing a book focussed on his father’s Games, says of Reynolds-Lewis and Quinn: “These two have been left out of our Australian Olympic history and should be recognised. They were not medal winners but, by entering, are Olympians.”
 
Coates’ commitment to redeem the records of the two “missing Olympians”, should Brisbane win the 2032 bid, is no token offer. A member of the IOC and very close to its president Thomas Bach, Coates is convinced that a change to the candidature rules makes Brisbane a genuine chance of winning. This is why with the support of all three levels of government and the opposition parties, and the unanimous agreement of the AOC executive, the formal notification of Brisbane 2032's candidature was made on January 2.
 
Coates added: “The Olympic Charter provides that ‘The organising committee for the Olympic Games shall organise a programme of cultural events which must cover at least the entire period during which the Olympic Village is open.’ It would be an ideal opportunity to honour our two previously unacknowledged Olympians.”

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On 1/19/2020 at 1:01 AM, AustralianFan said:

I don't see anything in there to shows how Brisbane will fund the new venues after the event. That information is not listed under "Master Plan and Venues" or "Legacy and Sustainability". Labelling a venue as a "Legacy Opportunity" does not absolve governments from needing to pay to maintain that venue after the three week event is finished. Let's not forget that the Brazilian government also heralded Rio's Olympic Park as a legacy opportunity as a training grounds for Brazilian Olympic athletes. The tricky part is finding the money for it. So the organizers need to explain to the Australian public how those facilities will be maintained.

Moreover there is a fundamental problem with creating new facilities to replace existing ones without consulting with the key stakeholders using the existing facilities. For example Durban built a new multipurpose stadium (Moses Mabhida Stadium) suitable for hosting the Olympics for the 2010 World Cup. But the local rugby union club has refused to move to the new stadium because they prefer playing in a rectangular stadium. The same issue is likely to be a sticking point for a plan to replace the rectangular Suncorp Stadium with either a new oval-shaped stadium or an expensive convertible stadium. In fact replacing The Gabba makes much more sense as cricket and the AFL use oval-shaped fields.

Living in another continent I wish Brisbane the best, and even if this turns into another Montreal I won't have to pay for it. But if I were Australian I would want a clear and concise plan for those venues rather than thinking "we already have venues for archery, golf and taekwondo, who cares about a few niggling details like the Olympic Stadium"?

Edited by Nacre

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1 hour ago, Nacre said:

I don't see anything in there to shows how Brisbane will fund the new venues after the event. That information is not listed under "Master Plan and Venues" or "Legacy and Sustainability". Labelling a venue as a "Legacy Opportunity" does not absolve governments from needing to pay to maintain that venue after the three week event is finished. Let's not forget that the Brazilian government also heralded Rio's Olympic Park as a legacy opportunity as a training grounds for Brazilian Olympic athletes. The tricky part is finding the money for it. So the organizers need to explain to the Australian public how those facilities will be maintained.

Moreover there is a fundamental problem with creating new facilities to replace existing ones without consulting with the key stakeholders using the existing facilities. For example Durban built a new multipurpose stadium (Moses Mabhida Stadium) suitable for hosting the Olympics for the 2010 World Cup. But the local rugby union club has refused to move to the new stadium because they prefer playing in a rectangular stadium. The same issue is likely to be a sticking point for a plan to replace the rectangular Suncorp Stadium with either a new oval-shaped stadium or an expensive convertible stadium. In fact replacing The Gabba makes much more sense as cricket and the AFL use oval-shaped fields.

Living in another continent I wish Brisbane the best, and even if this turns into another Montreal I won't have to pay for it. But if I were Australian I would want a clear and concise plan for those venues rather than thinking "we already have venues for archery, golf and taekwondo, who cares about a few niggling details like the Olympic Stadium"?

Exactly. If we go for the sole "Master Plan and Venues" ligned, then Stockholm would have won. Or Boston would have been accepted with no hesitation.

Promising doesn't cost anything. The main issue is about the cost and final adaptation. So far, while the plan looks so "dandy" and "beautiful", there are still huge concerns related to the clear plan and organization and that's not clear in those lines. 

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On 1/21/2020 at 1:49 PM, Roger87 said:

Exactly. If we go for the sole "Master Plan and Venues" ligned, then Stockholm would have won. Or Boston would have been accepted with no hesitation.

Promising doesn't cost anything. The main issue is about the cost and final adaptation. So far, while the plan looks so "dandy" and "beautiful", there are still huge concerns related to the clear plan and organization and that's not clear in those lines. 

 

On 1/21/2020 at 11:50 AM, Nacre said:

I don't see anything in there to shows how Brisbane will fund the new venues after the event. That information is not listed under "Master Plan and Venues" or "Legacy and Sustainability". Labelling a venue as a "Legacy Opportunity" does not absolve governments from needing to pay to maintain that venue after the three week event is finished. Let's not forget that the Brazilian government also heralded Rio's Olympic Park as a legacy opportunity as a training grounds for Brazilian Olympic athletes. The tricky part is finding the money for it. So the organizers need to explain to the Australian public how those facilities will be maintained.

Moreover there is a fundamental problem with creating new facilities to replace existing ones without consulting with the key stakeholders using the existing facilities. For example Durban built a new multipurpose stadium (Moses Mabhida Stadium) suitable for hosting the Olympics for the 2010 World Cup. But the local rugby union club has refused to move to the new stadium because they prefer playing in a rectangular stadium. The same issue is likely to be a sticking point for a plan to replace the rectangular Suncorp Stadium with either a new oval-shaped stadium or an expensive convertible stadium. In fact replacing The Gabba makes much more sense as cricket and the AFL use oval-shaped fields.

Living in another continent I wish Brisbane the best, and even if this turns into another Montreal I won't have to pay for it. But if I were Australian I would want a clear and concise plan for those venues rather than thinking "we already have venues for archery, golf and taekwondo, who cares about a few niggling details like the Olympic Stadium"?

Watch this space.

These details of the Bid will be out very soon since it has already been announced by the Australian Olympic Committee that the Brisbane/SEQ 2032 Candidature File will be formally lodged with the IOC ahead of the IOC Executive Board Meeting and IOC Session preceding the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

The question then is, will this year’s IOC Session at Tokyo 2020 then vote on the 2032 Host?

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1 hour ago, AustralianFan said:

These details of the Bid will be out very soon since it has already been announced by the Australian Olympic Committee that the Brisbane/SEQ 2032 Candidature File will be formally lodged with the IOC ahead of the IOC Executive Board Meeting and IOC Session preceding the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

The question then is, will this year’s IOC Session at Tokyo 2020 then vote on the 2032 Host?

How can Australia accept hosting the 2032 games before figuring out what it will do with these major venues?

A wise city works out the legacy plan first and only afterwards proceeds with a bid for a sporting event. Winning the bid and then planning the legacy afterwards is like making arrangements for a wedding and afterwards desperately looking for someone to marry. Perhaps it will all work out for the best. But if I were the mayor of Brisbane or premier of Queensland I wouldn't risk the future of my citizens on "perhaps".

Edited by Nacre

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4 hours ago, Nacre said:

How can Australia accept hosting the 2032 games before figuring out what it will do with these major venues?

A wise city works out the legacy plan first and only afterwards proceeds with a bid for a sporting event. Winning the bid and then planning the legacy afterwards is like making arrangements for a wedding and afterwards desperately looking for someone to marry. Perhaps it will all work out for the best. But if I were the mayor of Brisbane or premier of Queensland I wouldn't risk the future of my citizens on "perhaps".

As I said, watch this space for when the Bid details are revealed in the Olympic Candidature file in a few months.

You are only reading the feasability study.

The feasability study is not the Candidature File.  You’ll need to wait for that, as we all will.

Don’t forget under the Agenda 2020 and the New Norm rules, legacy and sustainability of venues is required.

That’s exactly what the Olympic Candidature is and will demonstrate.

It’s coming, don’t worry.

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Olympic Candidature File to be Presented to IOC Before Tokyo Olympic Games in July 2020 

  • AOC President, John Coates said, on 9 December 2019, that the OCLG  will now work through governance arrangements and the next necessary steps in compiling a Candidature File which would be presented to the International Olympic Committee before the Tokyo Olympic Games in July 2020.

 

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5 hours ago, Nacre said:

How can Australia accept hosting the 2032 games before figuring out what it will do with these major venues?

A wise city works out the legacy plan first and only afterwards proceeds with a bid for a sporting event. Winning the bid and then planning the legacy afterwards is like making arrangements for a wedding and afterwards desperately looking for someone to marry. Perhaps it will all work out for the best. But if I were the mayor of Brisbane or premier of Queensland I wouldn't risk the future of my citizens on "perhaps".

There is nothing desperate about this Bid.

The genesis of where Brisbane/SEQ 2032 is now, really started 4 years ago when the Prefeasibility Study was conducted by the SEQ Mayors about a possible bid for 2028.

Then came in early 2019 the release of the 2032 Feasibility and People Mass Movement Studies.

The 2032 Bid Team have not been sitting idle ‘whistling Dixie’ since then.

Remember too, a Feasibility Study is just that   -   it is NOT the official Olympic Candidature file.

You must realise also that under the IOC’s New Norm changes passed last year, is that the IOC Future Bid Commission must be convinced of the detail of the legacy and sustainability of any planned New Venues.  

Brisbane/SEQ 2032 are not widely considered to be the front-runners for having sat on their hands.

They started way early, compared to their Bid rivals, and have been boosted by support from:

- Sydney 2000 officials,

- 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast,

- the IOC President visiting Australia last year,

- 2019 Sport Accord on the Gold Coast,

- Australian Olympic Committee,

- all three levels of government,

- the main opposition party in Queensland,

- leading sporting identities,

- the passing of the latest New Norm bidding changes by the IOC Session mid-2019, and

- the Bid team visiting IOC HQ in September, and

- the accompanying IOC President’s public declaration during that that visit of a possible early 2032 vote.

Just because you cannot see the detail yourself right now, does not mean all three levels of government are not working on it and have been doing done so for a considerable amount of time.

The Bid team have to persuade the IOC’s Future Bid Commission, not you or me.

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The feasibility study may not be the same as the candidature file but that doesn't change the fact Brisbane's initial evaluation shows a key number of expensive venues that have no defined legacy. If you're going to build an Olympic Stadium, temporary seating or not, there needs to at least be a tenant identified who would take over the stadium post-Olympics well beforehand. As of right now, Brisbane has none. And how many of the venues were considered as community centres as a legacy? Not viable. If Brisbane is indeed awarded the 2032 SOGs, I predict once the costs start piling up (I don't see how Brisbane does this for under at least $15 billion) then you will see the likes of Sydney included as I mentioned before.

As for Brisbane being a front runner, that's more or less because of other quality bids (forget Indonesia, India, or the pie in the sky joint Korea bid). If a bid from either the Rhine-Rhur region of Germany or Madrid is serious then the race gets a lot more interesting.

As for the IOC insisting on sustainable legacy, they may do so under New Norm, but the sports federations have not. Case in point, Tokyo wanted to use existing venues for rowing and volleyball yet their respective sports federations twisted the arms of the organizers and the IOC to get new venues with questionable legacies. If it can happen with Tokyo, it can happen with Brisbane.

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1 hour ago, stryker said:

The feasibility study may not be the same as the candidature file but that doesn't change the fact Brisbane's initial evaluation shows a key number of expensive venues that have no defined legacy. If you're going to build an Olympic Stadium, temporary seating or not, there needs to at least be a tenant identified who would take over the stadium post-Olympics well beforehand. As of right now, Brisbane has none. And how many of the venues were considered as community centres as a legacy? Not viable. If Brisbane is indeed awarded the 2032 SOGs, I predict once the costs start piling up (I don't see how Brisbane does this for under at least $15 billion) then you will see the likes of Sydney included as I mentioned before.

As for Brisbane being a front runner, that's more or less because of other quality bids (forget Indonesia, India, or the pie in the sky joint Korea bid). If a bid from either the Rhine-Rhur region of Germany or Madrid is serious then the race gets a lot more interesting.

As for the IOC insisting on sustainable legacy, they may do so under New Norm, but the sports federations have not. Case in point, Tokyo wanted to use existing venues for rowing and volleyball yet their respective sports federations twisted the arms of the organizers and the IOC to get new venues with questionable legacies. If it can happen with Tokyo, it can happen with Brisbane.

As of right now?  How do you know that?  The feasibility study was released a year ago. Do you really think that the Candidature File is not going to have all the required detail?

You have no idea of the Stadium developments behind the scenes nor any tenant or legacy proposals for the Stadium nor any other planned new venues.

Brisbane/SEQ 2032 do not report to you nor the media.  This will all be released soon enough at the appropriate time.  It still is a competitive bidding race after all and right now Brisbane/SEQ 2032 are all over it.

Brisbane/SEQ 2032 is widely acknowledged to be clearly the front runner - you seem to be in denial about this.   From the words of the IOC President Bach himself who, while with the Queensland delegation in Lausanne 4 months ago, publicly announced that the 2032 Host may be elected early.  The Games would indeed be in safe hands once again in Australia, following the safe hands of LA, Paris, Tokyo, etc.

If Brisbane is elected Host ahead of Tokyo 2020, that’s it, game over for anyone else who are all lagging way behind in this new bidding era.  You may not like this reality, but thats the actual reality right now.

This is new the era of bidding.

What happened in Tokyo is what happened in Tokyo.  But the IOC is happy with what they have seen so far with Sydney’s 2000 Rowing venue at Penrith listed one year ago as the backup flatwater/whitewater rowing venues if a new one in Queensland does not occur.  Not a problem.

The IOC is also happy with Paris 2024 having the surfing competition Tahiti halfway around the globe.  Not a problem.

All that Brisbane/SEQ 2032 need to worry about is complying with Agenda 2020 (part 1) and the New Norm (part 2) IOC bidding procedures.   That they are doing,  but do not expect to know everything that has been done since the release of the Feasibility Study a year ago to be released right now.  You’ll just have to wait.

 

 

 

 

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As an English cricket fan, I’ve often thought an 80000 seat Gabba would be pretty cool. Even if it’s not actually at the Gabba itself (the site’s pretty closed in isn’t it?). Unless the cricket/Aussie rules teams are so committed to the current Gabba that they’d never move, I can’t imagine you’d struggle to fill a bigger version. 

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1 hour ago, yoshi said:

As an English cricket fan, I’ve often thought an 80000 seat Gabba would be pretty cool. Even if it’s not actually at the Gabba itself (the site’s pretty closed in isn’t it?). Unless the cricket/Aussie rules teams are so committed to the current Gabba that they’d never move, I can’t imagine you’d struggle to fill a bigger version. 

Yes, it would be nice to have a bigger Gabba who capacity is currently only 42,000.

The bid team (Premier Palasczuk)  certainly considering it for at least the Opening Ceremony but its capacity for the big opening party is perhaps too limited even for that with further seating reduction with theatrical staging, etc.

For the Athletics Track & Field, its anybody’s guess as to whether the final decision will be:

- a new stadium with temporary seating to lift capacity to close to 60,000,

- an upgraded stadium such as QSAC (formerly QE11) with or without temporary seating (as occurred in 1982 for the CW Games), or

- a new stadium with permanent seating capacity (similar to Perth’s new Optus Stadium where cricket and football have happily moved to and regularly fill it).

 

 

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On 1/24/2020 at 11:10 AM, AustralianFan said:

Yes, it would be nice to have a bigger Gabba who capacity is currently only 42,000.

The bid team (Premier Palasczuk)  certainly considering it for at least the Opening Ceremony but its capacity for the big opening party is perhaps too limited even for that with further seating reduction with theatrical staging, etc.

For the Athletics Track & Field, its anybody’s guess as to whether the final decision will be:

- a new stadium with temporary seating to lift capacity to close to 60,000,

- an upgraded stadium such as QSAC (formerly QE11) with or without temporary seating (as occurred in 1982 for the CW Games), or

- a new stadium with permanent seating capacity (similar to Perth’s new Optus Stadium where cricket and football have happily moved to and regularly fill it).

 

 

I hope they don't redevelop the QEII. The problem with the QEII is it's location. it's miles from any decent public transport.  I remember when Suncorp was redeveloped and the Broncos went to QEII during the building. It was painful to get to / from via public transport. required a train than a switch to a bus.

 

It's an interesting question. I can't think of any teams needing a venue even of 40,000 in a configuration used for track and field. The only thing that comes to mind is if the venue is convertible (same as eden park in auckland that can be used for Rugby and Cricket) and the NRL have brought in a second brisbane team by than (Could happen in 2023) and they might want there own venue rather than using suncorp.

 

 

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On 1/24/2020 at 9:48 AM, yoshi said:

As an English cricket fan, I’ve often thought an 80000 seat Gabba would be pretty cool. Even if it’s not actually at the Gabba itself (the site’s pretty closed in isn’t it?). Unless the cricket/Aussie rules teams are so committed to the current Gabba that they’d never move, I can’t imagine you’d struggle to fill a bigger version. 

The problem with AFL is that it is a secondary sport in Qld. people only show up in big numbers when the lions are winning. if they are not you would really struggle to get 20,000 to a game (look at the Qld reds where if they play a south African side in super rugby they struggle to get 10,000) 

 

In terms of cricket, people only come out if we are playing the Poms for the ashes or india. if we are playing pakistan or someone else they also struggle to get numbers.  Even the MCG with a capacity of 100,000 really only sells out a few times a year

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I think if Madrid enter the games they represent a severe threat to the current front runner.

Facing facts were are talking about the 3rd largest city vs. a capital city and soon to be 2nd largest in the EU.

Dust off the 2012/2016/2020 bids there is a low risk bid for the IOC with no white elephants but lacking one venue - the Olympic stadium ....

... how about a temporary expansion of the Estadio de Vallhermoso, an existing 12,000 seat venue with temporary stands up to 60,000 seats currently hosting the Meeting de Athletismo Madrid?

 

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Booville said:

I think if Madrid enter the games they represent a severe threat to the current front runner.

Facing facts were are talking about the 3rd largest city vs. a capital city and soon to be 2nd largest in the EU.

Dust off the 2012/2016/2020 bids there is a low risk bid for the IOC with no white elephants but lacking one venue - the Olympic stadium ....

... how about a temporary expansion of the Estadio de Vallhermoso, an existing 12,000 seat venue with temporary stands up to 60,000 seats currently hosting the Meeting de Athletismo Madrid?

 

 

 

Your post should be in ‘Madrid 2032’.

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New 80,000-seat Brisbane stadium central to 2032 Olympics bid

(This story from ‘Austadiums’ appeared around the time the Brisbane/SEQ 2032 delegation was meeting with the IOC in Lausanne)

Source: Austadiums   |  Wednesday 11th September 2019 

https://www.austadiums.com/news/news.php?id=695

 

Details for Brisbane’s bid for the 2032 Olympics have been revealed, with a new world-class 80,000-seat stadium central to the plans.

 It comes as an Australian delegation met with Olympics powerbrokers in Switzerland, with Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk telling the congregation that Queensland would stage a “safe and welcoming” Olympic Games.

 The new stadium would host the athletics and opening and closing ceremonies of a south east Queensland Games.     

 Potential locations for the new venue include the RNA Showgrounds, QEII Stadium at Nathan, the Mayne Rodd Rail Yards at Bowen Hills and Albion Park.

 The masterplan also includes two athletes villages - one in Brisbane and the other on the Gold Coast - a faster rail network linking the region and a second M1 Highway between the Gold Coast and Brisbane.

 Specific details of the new stadium or other venues to be used as part of a Brisbane Olympic are yet to be revealed, however Suncorp Stadium, the Gabba, Queensland Tennis Centre and the Sleeman Sports Complex would likely be part of the bid.

 The Brisbane Aquatic Centre, Entertainment Centre & QEII Stadium, among others, are already considered dated facilities and would need work to be considered.

 There’s also a host of facilities on the Gold Coast built or upgraded as part of the 2018 Commonwealth Games that could feature.

If the IOC likes what it hears, Queensland will proceed on its final bid, which will go before the IOC just before the Tokyo Olympics in July next year. A final decision would then be likely by 2022. China and Russia loom as the main rivals to a Queensland bid. Shanghai and St Petersburg also are understood to be readying bids for 2032.

 If Brisbane was to host the Olympics, it would be the third Games held in Australia, with Melbourne the first in 1956 and Sydney the most recent in 2000.

 (end of story)

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————

It should be noted that Australian Olympic Committee President, John Coates, said there was no requirement for a new 80,000-seat stadium in Brisbane, arguing a smaller venue could be built.

 "The maximum is 60,000, that's what's been provided in Tokyo, that's what London provided," he said.

 "And that could be a stadium that could reduce to a lesser amount afterwards, depending on what the legacy is going to be - no requirement for 80,000."

For the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020, Japan is building a 68,000-seat stadium with a capacity of more than 80,000 using temporary seating.

 (by Felicity Caldwell, Brisbane Times, 11:30am September 11, 2019)

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/queensland/queensland-does-not-need-new-80-000-seat-olympics-stadium-coates-20190911-p52q69.html

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1 hour ago, Roger87 said:

I confirm this thread has become promotion tour lol.

Welcome to what a thread is.

Discussion, debate, promotion or disregarding of ideas or points of view.

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