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I take it that approval from all relevant governments permitting, we can expect the confirmatory vote to be at the Session attached to Tokyo 2020? Can’t see any point in dragging out any more than that - from either party’s point of view. 

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2 hours ago, yoshi said:

I take it that approval from all relevant governments permitting, we can expect the confirmatory vote to be at the Session attached to Tokyo 2020? Can’t see any point in dragging out any more than that - from either party’s point of view. 

Yes, it certainly is possible for the 2032 host city to be elected at the IOC Session at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Confirmed IOC Session dates in 2020 are:

Jan 10, 2020:  Lausanne, Switzerland

July 21-22, 2020: Tokyo, Japan

(IOC Session dates for 2021 do not yet appear to have been confirmed)

Source:  https://www.olympic.org/ioc-event-calendar

 

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3 hours ago, yoshi said:

Is all government approval & red tape already sorted - could it all be signed & sealed on January 10?

My bet is that the 2032 vote will be in 2021, but I wouldn’t rule out a vote at the Tokyo 2020 Session.

Jan 10 is probably too soon.

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AOC President John Coates On Brisbane 2032

Today Show (Nine Network Australia) interview with John Coates, President of Australian Olympic Committee and President of the Court of Arbitration for Sport about Russia’s world sport ban and Brisbane’s 2032 Olympics bid.

Source: Brisbane Times, December 10, 2019:  https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/sport/coates-on-russia-ban-brisbane-bid-20191210-p53ifz.html

 

Today Show Journalist:   “Lets talk about Brisbane, the official bid for 2032: where to from here?”

John Coates:   “Ok the councils of South East Queensland, they’ve investigated it, they’ve signed off on it at the end of last year (2018).

The Prime Minister enthusiastically embraced it in the meeting he had with (IOC) President Bach and myself off the back of the G20 in Osaka in August.  The Federal Government’s in. 

Correctly, the Queensland Government wanted to be certain of all the figures and ensure it wasn’t going to be a burden on anyone, taxpayers particularly. They’ve now signed off on the fact that the operating budget for the Games will cut even without any contribution from ratepayers or taxpayers.  The cost is a little bit more, I understand, than the budgeting we had for Sydney back 20 years ago.

But these days the IOC contributes from the television and sponsorship rights what for Los Angeles in 2028 is $1.8 billion USD , so $2.5 billion has been committed by the IOC towards a budget around $4.4 billion.  Then you cover the rest through ticketing and through national sponsors so it cuts even. 

 The issue then is the infrastructure and, understandably, the Queensland Government has said look we want to know in our priority over the next six months is to be sure that the Federal Government will participate in the infrastructure that’s required to improve the connectivity between the 3 cities.”

Journalist:   “But of course for Queenslanders best place to host the Olympic Games, I’m sure, come on, we’ll get it?”

John Coates:  “We are now before the IOC.  They’ve received it very well in the meeting we’ve had with them and I think it’s a real chance.  This is the opportunity.”

 Journalist: ““Bring it on.”

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Seems like Brisbane's to lose, but $4.4 billion? Are they serious about hosting a SOGs for this? I am assuming they aren't factoring in costs for transportation improvements. Even so, Brisbane is woefully short on the venue front (I highly doubt an 80,000 or 60,000 seat Olympic Stadium will be temporary). I'll be interested to see what an actual venue plan looks like. Compared to Mebourne, the only thing Brisbane has going for it is the weather but if Coates really pushed for Brisbane, I'll be interested to see how spins this when the actual costs start coming out because these figures are in fantasy land.

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22 minutes ago, stryker said:

Seems like Brisbane's to lose, but $4.4 billion? Are they serious about hosting a SOGs for this? I am assuming they aren't factoring in costs for transportation improvements. Even so, Brisbane is woefully short on the venue front (I highly doubt an 80,000 or 60,000 seat Olympic Stadium will be temporary). I'll be interested to see what an actual venue plan looks like. Compared to Mebourne, the only thing Brisbane has going for it is the weather but if Coates really pushed for Brisbane, I'll be interested to see how spins this when the actual costs start coming out because these figures are in fantasy land.

Adding the recent popular anger related to the incompetence of the government (national and province) to stop the bushfires, it may backfire when the real costs came to the light. 

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On 1/10/2020 at 6:08 PM, stryker said:

 I am assuming they aren't factoring in costs for transportation improvements. Even so, Brisbane is woefully short on the venue front (I highly doubt an 80,000 or 60,000 seat Olympic Stadium will be temporary).

There are transport improvements happening anyway - Cross river rail is under construction and work has begun planning the brisbane metro. these projects are happenign regardless of the outcome of the games bid, but will be a massive help with games transport.

On 1/10/2020 at 6:31 PM, Roger87 said:

Adding the recent popular anger related to the incompetence of the government (national and province) to stop the bushfires, it may backfire when the real costs came to the light. 

Most of the anger is at the federal government, and in particular the PM. it won't have much effect on the Qld state government, and our current PM has a marketing background so he knows the value of the games to sell himself (and it won't matter anyway because by the time the games fallout hits he will be long gone) 

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Just to expand on my previous post, the below projects are underway in Brisbane regardless of the outcome of the games bid. 

Cross River Rail

  • Main feature is a 3.7 Mile underground tunnel 
  • 2 new stations on on the tunnel route including one across the road from the Woolloongabba Station and the first new city station in 130 years (Albert St) along with 3 New stations on the gold coast line (Pimpama, Helensvale North and Merrimac)
  • upgrades to another 10 stations (4 on the tunnel route (Boggo Road, Roma St, Exhibition and  Dutton Park on the route, and Major upgrades to Salisbury, Rocklea, Moorooka, Yeerongpilly, Yeronga, and Fairfield stations on the southside

Brisbane Live

  • As part of the changes to Roma St station (putting the station underground) a significant amount of public space will be made available. Some of this will be made available for a new venue known at the moment as "Brisbane Live" 
  • Brisbane Live will be privately funded 18,000 seat venue which will be at no cost to the taxpayers of Brisbane
  • This venue will sit on top of the biggest train station in Brisbane (long distance busses and trains also leave from  this venue)
  • This venue is market driven and it was AEG Ogden who approached the government for this

Brisbane Metro

  • The first stage of Brisbane Metro is underway and will provide a 21 kilometre service
  • will have 18 stations along dedicated busways between Eight Mile Plains and Roma Street, and Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and University of Queensland
  • Will use Bi-articulated EV Busses
  • Will also connect to wolloongabba.

 

Brisbane also has an extensive network of Busways - these are not just bus lanes on existing roads but are fully grade separated bus only roads that generally follow major roadways to keep busses off the roads. These were used when brisbane hosted the G20 conference as motorcade routes.

 

On 1/10/2020 at 6:31 PM, Roger87 said:

Adding the recent popular anger related to the incompetence of the government (national and province) to stop the bushfires, it may backfire when the real costs came to the light. 

To add onto what i said above. There is very little anger directed at the Qld government. This is probably due to the fact Qld is pretty much unaffected by the fires. The major local newspaper (The Courier Mail) tried to manufacture some outrage against the state government but it did not work (The Courier Mail has a distinct slant to the right and the current state government is left leaning. We also have a state election in October)

 The anger is directed at the federal government and in particular the prime minister who is a climate change denier and even brought a lump of coal into parliament. The PM also took a holiday to Hawaii just before christmas when the full scale of the bushfires was known rather than stay back and lead.

 

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On 1/10/2020 at 4:08 PM, stryker said:

Seems like Brisbane's to lose, but $4.4 billion? Are they serious about hosting a SOGs for this? I am assuming they aren't factoring in costs for transportation improvements. Even so, Brisbane is woefully short on the venue front (I highly doubt an 80,000 or 60,000 seat Olympic Stadium will be temporary). I'll be interested to see what an actual venue plan looks like. Compared to Mebourne, the only thing Brisbane has going for it is the weather but if Coates really pushed for Brisbane, I'll be interested to see how spins this when the actual costs start coming out because these figures are in fantasy land.

John Coates was actually talking about LA 2028, not Brisbane 2032, when he mentions the figure $4.4 billion.  He was only using Los Angeles 2028 as an example of the scale of funding that the IOC contributes.

He then goes on to talk about the rest of the Host City budget when he says following the $4.4 billion:   “Then you cover the rest through ticketing and through national sponsors so it cuts even”.

Until a Host City contract is signed,  the IOC cannot commit funding.

 
 

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Qld Olympic bid 'something to look forward to following shocking year' 

Source: Skynews Australia, 10/12/2019

 
Skynews Reporter, Peter Stefanovic, interviews Anastasia Pakasczuk, Premier of Queenlsand
 

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews:   “Back to the Olympic Bid for 2032 Premier, what has the International Olympic Committee told you that has given you confidence that you will get the Games in 2032?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:  “Earlier this year John Coates and myself travelled over to Lausanne in Switzerland, we met with Thomas Bach.  Thomas Bach has been out to Queensland, he loves Queensland. And really Queensland is in the box seat for the hosting of an Olympics in 2032.

If you think about it, Sydney had their time to shine in 2000 and this is a great opportunity for Brisbane and for Queensland and now we need to get down and do the hard work, we need to finalise all of the venues, we need to finalise where the openeing ceremony and the athletes village is going to be, as well as where the athletics competition is going to take place.

We want to make sure it will be a great experience for our athletes but also too, I think Queensland showed that with the Commonwealth Games we can deliver a world class event and to have the eyes (of the world) on Queensland, the tourism and trade benefits are just phenomenal and into the tens of billions of dollars.”

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews:    “For the gamblers out there Premier, what do you think Queensland’s odds are of getting it?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:   “I always keep my fingers crossed and of course when I met with Thomas Bach he said basically that are the frontrunners. But course there is a lot of work to happen.

Over the course of next year is the detailed assessment and the detailed work, we need to get down to the fine tuning of costings.

The new norm means that its not these big huge Olympics that Australians are used to seeing across the world, its about utilising existing infrastructure, making sure that its Games Friendly and I think that we have the experience to do that.

We want to make it a world class event. But we need everybody to be working together and that means working together financially as well.  I think if we can have that level of cooperation, its a good thing for Queensland and Australia can share in the pride of having an Olympics back in Australia.”

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews:   “Premier what is the cost, or what will the cost be to the state?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:  “So what’s happening for the first time under the new norm, the Olympics federation (IOC) are putting in substantial amounts of money so the operating costs  of the Games are actually covered.

So what we now need to do because we have 80% of the venues, which is a huge tick, we need to work ot those final venues and then work out the key infrastructure that’s actually needed to bring about these Games.

But also too its infrastructure that Queensland would need. What we’re saying is can we move forward some of this infrastructure, this transport infrastructure.  We’ve got estimates of 130,000 jobs, that’s good for the Queensland economy.

But also too hosting an Olympics gives incredible pride to Queenslanders to think, hang on a minute, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity.  We’re in the box seat. Let’s do everything we can to see if we can bring this about.”

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews: “Well as I understand it, Queensland is about 90 billion dollars in debt, how can the state afford it?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:  “It’s actually 8 billion net debt, it’s actually less than New South Wales and Victoria.  What we know is that this infratructure is needed for the South East anyway.

We will make sure that we go through detailed planning and processes and what we will definitely working with the Commonwealth, the local Councils and the State Government in terms of shared financial responsibility.”

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews:   “There’s no doubt that there would be a boom in jobs but at the moment much of the state is struggling with fires, its struggling with drought as well, so is the timing right to be spending do much money on an Olympic Games Bid and potentially an Olympic Games as well?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:  “That’s a really good question. But we haven’t even got the bid yet so lets take one step at a time.  We’re doing the costings.  Yes we know, we’ve had drought and natural disasters, we’ve had bushfires, we’ve had monsoonal floods.  It has been a shocker offa year in terms of natural disasters.

But you know what? Queenslanders have rallied together and we’ve got through it. We work best when we work tobether and I think after the year that after the year that we’ve had its good to have something to look forward.

This is about our children and future generations. At the end of the day, it’s a great legacy to leave our kids.”

Peter Stefanovic, Skynews:  “A lot of the cities that host the Olympic Games do end up falling into re ession afterwards Premier, although London was a rare success story. It basically rejuvenated the troubled Eastern parts of London.   Do you have a legacy plan? Will you be introducing a legacy plan for beyond the Games?”

Premier Anastasia Palaszuk:   “Yes absolutely.  We’ve already been talking about that. 

There’s a couple of things. The first thing is that any housing for example that’s built for the athletes, we want to make sure that it is utilised as housing that can benefit Queenslanders into the future.

Also too, we have been talking about rejuvenating some areas that are a bit run down in the city and bringing about new venues, which is a positve. But also too, what worked really well for the Commonwealth Games we had a Coomera Indoors Centre.     The Coomera Indoors Centre now utilise for that growing part of Queensland. It’s one of the fastest growing parts of the country actually.  It is now utilised basically allthe time.

So now we are looking at where we can place those legacy halls across the South East but also we want to make sure we are delivering legacy items for the rest of Queensland as well.”

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On 1/10/2020 at 7:08 PM, stryker said:

Even so, Brisbane is woefully short on the venue front

80% of venues already exist. That’s not woefully short.

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BRISBANE 2032 VENUES

Excerpts From ‘2032 SEQ Olympic and Paralympic Games Feasibility Study’

Source: https://seqmayors.qld.gov.au/initiatives/2mfHY5whV6uNpagYpw2v

 

VENUE HUBS

Three primary ‘hubs’ of Games venues in Brisbane, Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast.

 

VENUES REQUIRED

 41

 

EXISTING VENUES

25

  • Including venues requiring upgrades to meet IOC / International Federation Requirements
  • A total of 28 existing venues were identified as meeting, or having the potential to meet, Olympic Games requirements.

 

VENUE CATEGORISATION COMPARISON TO RECENT BIDS

Venue Category

EXISTING VENUES

Including venues requiring upgrades to meet IOC / IF requirements:

RIO 2016:   53%

TOKYO 2020: 41%

PARIS 2024:   73%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (current): 60%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (2021):     70%

 

PLANNED VENUES

To be built irrespective of a Games, with initial planning underway:

RIO 2016:   26%

TOKYO 2020:   29%

PARIS 2024:   6%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (current):  30%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (2021):     20%

 

TEMPORARY VENUES

Venues which would typically be delivered primarily as temporary:

RIO 2016:   21%

TOKYO 2020:   30%

PARIS 2024:   21%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (current):  10%

SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND (2021):     10%

 

BRISBANE 2032 VENUES,

By Location:

 

BRISBANE

Olympic Stadium

ATHLETICS

TRACK AND FIELD

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 55,000

 

Development options discussed:

1. Utilise / adapt existing stadium

2. Develop new stadium (based on legacy need)

 

>>Proposed legacy strategy – Option 2:

  • Prior to the Stadiums Taskforce review, there was an identified need for a 25,000 - 30,000-capacity stadium to supplement Suncorp Stadium at some stage in the period from 2028-2047.
  • While the Stadiums Taskforce review considered the period up to 2038 it also noted that a future Games and the future of professional sporting codes in SEQ may have a bearing on the need for additional capacity and this should be aligned with key stakeholders, 
  • Therefore, a new stadium has been included in the Indicative Master Plan, allowing for temporary adaptation to increase the seating capacity to 55,000 at Games time.

 

AQUATICS

SWIMMING

ARTISTIC SWIMMING

Planned Venue

Capacity: 15,000

Development options discussed:

1. Temporary pool within indoor arena

2. Permanent aquatics facility with temporary expansion

3. Temporary / relocatable aquatics stadium

 

>>Proposed legacy strategy – Option 1:

Following discussions with key stakeholders, including key Queensland Government and sport agencies, a strategy has been proposed for the sport of Aquatics as follows:

  • For Swimming and Artistic Swimming competition, a potential solution would be to utilise a major indoor arena using a temporary pool as done for the 2007 FINA World Championships in Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne, should a new arena be developed as is currently planned. This would achieve a suitable showcasing and a significant capacity of over 15,000 for a key sport, that does not exist in a current aquatic venue in the region
  • This recommendation aligns with the outcomes of the Venue Audit process, which determined there was no legacy for a new major Aquatic Centre within SEQ.

 

AQUATICS

DIVING

WATER POLO

Existing Venue

Capacity: 5000

 

ARCHERY

(Qualification)

Existing Venue

Capacity: 1000

 

BASKETBALL      

(Preliminaries / Finals)

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 15,000

 

ROWING

CANOE-KAYAK  (Sprint)

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 14,000

  • Discussions are ongoing as relates to a potential legacy venue in the Brisbane area, with a specific site being considered.
  • Should the proposed legacy venue in Brisbane not be developed, further analysis will be undertaken on existing Rowing facilities
  • in Scenic Rim and regional Queensland, with input from the International Rowing Federation (World Rowing) to determine the feasibility of these venues.
  • If a Queensland location is not viable the existing facility in Penrith, NSW (site for the 2000 Olympic Games) will meet requirements, subject to weather considerations.

 

CYCLING BMX

Existing Venue

Capacity: 5000

 

CYCLING TRACK

Existing Venue

Capacity: 5000

 

FENCING

Existing Venue

Capacity: 6000

 

FOOTBALL FINALS

Existing Venue

Capacity: 52,000

 

GYMNASTICS

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 10,000

 

HOCKEY

Existing Venue

Capacity: 18,000

 

JUDO

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 8,000

 

ROWING

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 14,000

 

RUGBY

Existing Venue

Capacity: 52,000

 

SAILING

Existing Venue

Capacity: 5,000

 

SHOOTING

Existing Venue

Capacity: 3,000

 

TABLE TENNIS

Existing Venue

Capacity: 6,000

 

TAEKWONDO

Existing Venue

Capacity: 6,000

 

TENNIS

Existing Venue

Capacity: 7,500  5,000  3,000

 

VOLLEYBALL

Existing Venue

Capacity: 13,000

 

WRESTLING

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 8,000

 

OLYMPIC VILLAGE  

  • Based on stakeholder consultation, a site of suitable area has been identified for an Olympic Village with a possible legacy use of housing and additional community facilities.

 

INTERNATIONAL BROADCAST CENTRE (IBC)

MAIN PRESS CENTRE (MPC)

  • Sites have been identified within Brisbane which could accommodate a suitable scale of development.
  • As seen in previous Games, a successful model for this facility would be the provision of a building ‘shell’ within the 2032 timeframe, which could transition into a major retail and / or cultural facility post-Games to align with legacy needs

MEDIA VILLAGES

  • Two potential sites have been identified within Brisbane which are considered optimal locations for future legacy residential developments, subject to appropriate development timeframes could provide central locations for media accommodation during the Games.
  • The amount of Media Village accommodation required would be based on availability of hotel and serviced apartment accommodation within Brisbane and the Gold Coast

 

MORETON BAY

EQUESTRIAN

Existing Venue

Capacity: 12,000

 

REDLAND

CANOE-KAYAK  (Slalom)

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 8,000

A number of potential locations for a Whitewater facility were considered across the region with a view to identifying the best potential legacy concept.

  • A legacy venue (with a potential use as a emergency services training facility) has been identified as a potential solution and this is being studied.
  • Should this or other potential locations not be feasible, the existing facility in Penrith, NSW (site for the 2000 Olympic Games) could meet requirements, subject to weather considerations.

 

GOLD COAST

ATHLETICS

WALKING

Temporary Venue

Capacity: 2,500

 

ATHLETICS

MARATHON

Temporary Venue

Capacity: 2,500

 

BASKETBALL

Preliminaries

Existing Venue

Capacity: 6,000

 

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Existing Venue

Capacity: 27,400

 

GOLF

Existing Venue

Capacity: 15,000

 

HANDBALL

Existing Venue

Capacity: 10,000

 

ATHLETE SATELLITE VILLAGE

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

 

SUNSHINE COAST

AQUATICS

SWIMMING MARATHON

Existing Venue

Capacity: 2,500

 

CYCLING

ROAD

Existing Venue

Capacity: 2,500

 

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Existing Venue

Capacity: 20,000

 

BEACH VOLLEYBALL

Temporary Venue

Capacity: 12,000

 

ATHLETE SATELLITE VILLAGE

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

 

IPSWICH

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Planned Venue

Capacity: 20,000

 

WEIGHTLIFTING

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 5,000

 

TOOWOOMBA

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Planned Venue

Capacity: 20,000

 

CYCLING

MOUNTAIN BIKE

Existing Venue

Capacity: 10,000

 

LOGAN

BOXING

Planned Venue

Legacy Opportunity

Capacity: 5,000

 

TOWNSVILLE

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Existing Venue

Capacity: 25,000

 

INTERSTATE  FOOTBALL VENUES

FOOTBALL

Preliminaries

Existing Venue x 2

Capacity: 45,000   30,000

 

ACCOMMODATION

  • Around 81,000 rooms are required to accommodate a Games - IOC / Olympic Family (41,000), Workforce (15,000), Visitors/Spectators (25,000) and an assumption that 10 percent of hotel and apartment rooms are left to serve other business during Games time.
  • Current hotel and apartment stock in SEQ sits at 40,500 rooms, and is forecast to reach 55,890 rooms by 2032.
  • While the study acknowledges this is a challenge for an SEQ Games, it can be addressed through temporary solutions such as student accommodation and cruise ship facilities (noting that Brisbane will have an international cruise ship terminal by 2032).

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Foreigners flock to Brisbane in record numbers, bringing their billions

Source:  Brisbane Times - By  Lucy Stone. January 17, 2020 — 11.12am

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/national/queensland/foreigners-flock-to-brisbane-in-record-numbers-bringing-their-billions-20200117-p53sbt.html

“A surging international and interstate tourism market has generated record-breaking visitor figures for Brisbane and other Queensland destinations.

In the year to September 2019, international visits to Brisbane were up 3.6 per cent to a record 1.4 million, of which 747,000 people were visiting for holidays.

International visitors who came to Brisbane to see family and friends also created a record, with a 9.1 per cent increase to 456,000.

Those international visitors spent $2.8 billion in the city, also up 4.4 per cent from the year prior.

Visitor numbers from China and the US also set records of 264,000 and 106,000 respectively, while visitors from Taiwan fell 9.4 per cent to 55,000.

The figures were released from Tourism Research Australia's annual International Visitor Survey on Friday.

Brisbane lord mayor Adrian Schrinner said the international markets had seen sustained growth with Brisbane in "hot pursuit of the lucrative North American market".

The number of interstate visitors to Brisbane also rose, with Sydney and Melbourne leading the charge to the Sunshine State.

A record high of 7.9 million interstate visitors came hand in hand with a 16.6 per cent leap in spending to $5.1 billion.

Interstate visitors also increasingly came to Brisbane specifically to holiday, with holidaymakers up 11.4 per cent and people visiting family and friends up 14.2 per cent.
 

Statewide, a record 239,000 Americans spent $422 million in Queensland over the year.

Acting Tourism Industry Development Minister Grace Grace said New Zealand and Japan contributed strongly to Queensland's tourism figures.

"These are great numbers that should be bolstered further by new flights from San Francisco, Chicago and Tokyo set to take off later this year and the destination marketing campaigns that will support them," she said.

Ms Grace said tropical North Queensland, the Sunshine Coast and the Fraser Coast generated record expenditure for combined international and domestic figures, while tropical North Queensland, southern Queensland country, the outback and the Fraser Coast also had record overnight visits for combined international and domestic figures.

Destination Gold Coast chief executive Annaliese Battista said the Gold Coast saw a resurgence in visitors from Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne.

“Increasing domestic market share through our marketing, which unapologetically plays to Gold Coast’s strengths, is paying off,” Ms Battista said.

“Australia is responding to our call to come and play on our beaches, in the hinterland and at our theme parks and other attractions."

China, New Zealand and Japan contributed to a boost to Gold Coast international visitor figures over the year, with 70,000 Japanese visitors, an increase of 3.7 per cent.

A record 45,000 Americans also visited the Gold Coast, up 9.7 per cent.”
(end of article’
———————————————-
 
This is also after a very successful Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in 2018.   It appears the 2032 Olympics Brisbane/SEQ Bid enjoys great support,  despite the negative spin of a certain politician.
 

 

 
 

 

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On 1/13/2020 at 5:56 PM, AustralianFan said:

80% of venues already exist. That’s not woefully short.

This is a bit disingenuous, though, considering that the structures that need to be built are the most expensive venues. There are many cities that are "only" lacking the main stadium, aquatics center, and two large arenas for gymnastics and basketball.

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2 hours ago, Nacre said:

This is a bit disingenuous, though, considering that the structures that need to be built are the most expensive venues. There are many cities that are "only" lacking the main stadium, aquatics center, and two large arenas for gymnastics and basketball.

I thought the exact same thing when I saw the 80% figure cited. In addition, how many of the planned venues are simply listed as legacy opportunity. The feasibility study simply called them community centres, not exactly a viable legacy as has already been pointed out. I'm a bit perplexed on the main aquatics venue. I get the idea of using a planned arena but I would assume that arena is the Brisbane Live Arena which seems like it is also marked as the basketball arena unless there's a second arena also being planned? And the stadium issue will continue to be a problem. Brisbane is relying on the much talked about but failed stadium with huge amounts of temporary seating. Now going from 55,000 to 30,000 might be easier than say London's original plan or the Incheon Asian Games Stadium fiasco, but it still leaves the city with a stadium with no permanent tenant. It's a big assumption to assume a team will be ready to move in.

A few weeks back I remember an article here dismissing an idea of co-hosting with New Zealand. While I think that's definitely out, it would not surprise me to see Sydney included in the final venue plan especially when the costs start going up for some of these new venues. Brisbane has no need for a rowing or slalom canoe course when Penrith Lakes would work just fine. I could even see the likes of Acer Arena included.

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On 1/17/2020 at 9:43 AM, Nacre said:

This is a bit disingenuous, though, considering that the structures that need to be built are the most expensive venues. There are many cities that are "only" lacking the main stadium, aquatics center, and two large arenas for gymnastics and basketball.

2032 SEQ Olympic and Paralympic Feasibility Study

https://firebasestorage.googleapis.com/v0/b/seqmaps-25ef7.appspot.com/o/publications%2Fsp4dv2zdezomPjqhxWEm?alt=media&token=aade24fd-27fc-43be-9f79-0b472d44000b

 

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2032 Olympic Games Candidature

Source: https://www.olympics.com.au/resources/articles/2032-olympic-games-candidature/

The Australian Olympic Committee believes sport in Queensland and Australia more broadly will be super-charged if Queensland was successful in convincing the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to bring the Games back to Australia.

Following the Queensland Government’s decision on December 9th 2019 to formally support a 2032 candidature, work is underway to finalise Queensland’s vision and plans for the Games.

The Games will be more than a two-week sporting event. There’s a ten-year runway of opportunity leading into the Games and decades of benefit to flow afterwards.

A Government study has predicted 129,000 jobs in tourism, hospitality and construction to be created by a Queensland Games.  A tourism study has identified a $20 billion uplift from 2021-2036.

With the IOC’s New Norm process in place, the cost of bidding for and hosting an Olympic Games has been significantly reduced.

The New Norm means hosts are encouraged to use existing sports infrastructure wherever possible, only creating new facilities if there’s a long-term sport and community benefit.

The operational cost of running the Games in Queensland would also be offset by a minimum $2.5 billion contribution from the IOC, plus sponsorship and ticket sales. A Queensland Games will be cost neutral or may even turn a profit in terms of operations.

Queensland will need to upgrade transport infrastructure between the Sunshine Coast, Brisbane and the Gold Coast if it hopes to host the 2032 Games, but these transport improvements are needed anyway because of the rapidly growing population. The improvements are not Games dependent.

Queensland offers a unified approach with the Federal Government, Queensland Government, Council of Mayors South East Queensland (COMSEQ) and the Australian Olympic Committee joined together to take a candidature forward.

This group has formed the Olympic Candidature Leadership Group (OCLG) which will undertake discussions with the IOC through the Future Host Commission, which is a body created to conduct discussions with cities and regions interested in hosting the Games.

In 2020, the OLCG will form the core of a new entity, a company which will take the candidature forward with representation from sport including Paralympics Australia, athletes and business.

 

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What Happens Now

Source: https://www.olympics.com.au/resources/articles/2032-olympic-games-candidature/

Continuous Dialogue With the IOC Future Host Commission

Targeted Dialogue

Future Host Commission recommends preferred candidate to IOC Executive Board

Executive Board recommends preferred candidate to IOC Session

IOC Session votes on Games’ Host

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Olympic Candidature Leadership Group (OCLG)

-  The Australian Prime Minister, Scott Morrison

-  The Queensland State Premier, Anastacia Palasczuk

-  The Brisbane Lord Mayor, Adrian Schrinner

-  The Australian Olympic Committee President, John Coates

-  The Queensland Minister for Innovation and Tourism Industry Development, Kate Jones

-  The Sunshine Coast Council Mayor, Mark Jamieson

-  The Federal Member for Fairfax, Ted O’Brien

 

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Reading the feasibility report reminds me the idea of Stockholm 2026. Nice at the beginning, but then you start questioning key aspects in consideration related to the costs and needs of the venues. And considering how Brisbane looks just a year ago, sorry but I don't believe these numbers for few venues. Brisbane can be the third Australian city but it's not Melbourne or Sydney in this kind of development

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1 hour ago, Roger87 said:

Reading the feasibility report reminds me the idea of Stockholm 2026. Nice at the beginning, but then you start questioning key aspects in consideration related to the costs and needs of the venues. And considering how Brisbane looks just a year ago, sorry but I don't believe these numbers for few venues. Brisbane can be the third Australian city but it's not Melbourne or Sydney in this kind of development

 Forget the old way of thinking.  

The IOC bidding rules, especially around venue requirements have changed in a big way,  eg viable legacy venue plans, temporary venues, maximum standard of venues not to exceed the standard required for the world championships in each sport, etc.

Brisbane and Australia has proven that it has what it takes to get this done.   

The IOC agrees, even so far as publicly stating that the Election of the 2032 Host City is likely to be held early.

Forget Sydney or Melbourne, forget their facilities - irrelevant. Those cities did not bid.

Brisbane/SEQ did.

All levels of government are joined at the hip re this Candidature and are advancing and are now finalising the detail of venues, etc  in the Candidature File.

Madrid, Indonesia and “all the rest of those cities thinking about 2032”  are way, way behind.

Brisbane and South East Queensland is close to the finish line.

The Olympic Candidature File for Brisbane/SEQ 2032 will be presented to the IOC before the Tokyo Olympic Games which commence 24 July 2020.

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How long would the process take between candidature file submission & executive board approval? 

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8 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

 Forget the old way of thinking.  

The IOC bidding rules, especially around venue requirements have changed in a big way,  eg viable legacy venue plans, temporary venues, maximum standard of venues not to exceed the standard required for the world championships in each sport, etc.

Brisbane and Australia has proven that it has what it takes to get this done.   

The IOC agrees, even so far as publicly stating that the Election of the 2032 Host City is likely to be held early.

Forget Sydney or Melbourne, forget their facilities - irrelevant. Those cities did not bid.

Brisbane/SEQ did.

All levels of government are joined at the hip re this Candidature and are advancing and are now finalising the detail of venues, etc  in the Candidature File.

Madrid, Indonesia and “all the rest of those cities thinking about 2032”  are way, way behind.

Brisbane and South East Queensland is close to the finish line.

The Olympic Candidature File for Brisbane/SEQ 2032 will be presented to the IOC before the Tokyo Olympic Games which commence 24 July 202

This has been precisely the point of Stockholm 2026. And still they lost to a bid which needs a full process for constructing venues (including the main stadiums). Even some aspects of the Agenda 2020 has been in blury lones precisely for the lack of limits about the "adaptation of the city's needs".

"Brisbane and Australia has proven that it has what it takes to get this done. "

How? The only reference we have it's the feasibility study, which as we can verify in every race, this plan is adapted and on top of that, like Nacre said, the main venues are the most expensive to build.

Madrid can still spoil the party if they present the 2020 bid adapted. Jakarta is a non sense agreed. There's still 7 months to reconsider the race to say way behind. 

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