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Yes I loved the outdoor pool at Athens 2004, I ended up going to the Monday night swimming finals and was a glorious electric atmospher :D

Yes, you’re right, the two outdoor pools were permanent and the additional grandstand seating was temporary. I would wander over and watchthe swimmers doing warm up laps in that second pool.

I went over to Athens 2004 and worked as a volunteer there for 3 weeks and had the best time, especially that night at the swimming, seeing Ian Thorpe win a gold medal and some other aussie medallists that night too.

I’ll have to dig up my photos from that beauiful exciting memorable summer in Greece. 

I’ve been to Greece every year since 2003, except for 2020.

 

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Thank goodness, these decisions are not made based on blogging comments on  whatever media platform. Three indicators show clearly that a majority of Queenslanders support the Olympics coming to

Sorry George_D, I should have clarified. At Athens 2004,  there was 2 outside permanent pools, one 50m  for the swimming competition and one permanent 25m pool in an area between the swimming pool and

I must have missed our referendum. 

 

 

Councillors to be briefed on secret Olympic bid details before vote

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Matt Dennien

March 15, 2021 — 5.34pm

Brisbane City Council will hold its first extraordinary closed-doors meeting in more than a decade next week to be briefed on confidential details of the 2032 Olympics Games pitch and formally vote to put itself forward as the host city.

The meeting, to be held on Tuesday, March 23, will be the first of its kind since councillors voted on Clem7 tunnel proposals in 2007, lord mayor Adrian Schrinner told reporters on Monday.

 

Cr Schrinner said a majority of the council would need to vote in favour of putting the city forward as host in the formal submission, to be handed to the International Olympic Committee next month.

He expected bipartisan support as both major parties were “clearly on board at all three levels of government”.

“This is a formal step, but this is also an opportunity for everyone to show their formal support for Brisbane being the host city for the 2032 Olympic Games,” he said. “This is something that the IOC will need from us next month. And this is something that we would like to seek the support of all councillors for.”

IOC vice-president John Coates and Paralympics Australia president Jock O’Callaghan, along with state and federal government representatives, are among those slated to brief the chamber on a “whole range of confidential details” about early planning for the Games.

This would include a “sport-by-sport” breakdown of venues to be used, back-up locations and any new infrastructure plans.

Councillors will then have an opportunity to ask questions and hold a debate, before voting to sign the host contract — an action also required by the state government — before the formal bid documentation is passed to the IOC next month.

 

The council will also vote to start negotiations with neighbouring councils and the state around “guarantees and indemnities” required to host the Olympics across multiple local government areas and Queensland government-owned facilities, Cr Schrinner said.

South-east Queensland appeared all but certain to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games after the bid was installed as the preferred candidate by the IOC last month.

 

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1 hour ago, George_D said:

in Athens we have an aquatics center with 2 pools. One indoor (6.200 seats) where water polo and diving were held  and one outdoor with 8.000 seats where swimming was held. So the biggest pool (for swimming events) wasnt temporay, it was just outdoor :D. Seats were there before the games and there were just some additional added for the games so as its capacity to be raised to 11.500 seats. The project was to be covered for the Olympics but IOC didnt demand it finally and it didnt happen

Indoor pool
https://www.wikiwand.com/el/Ολυμπιακό_Κέντρο_Υγρού_Στίβου_Αθηνών

Outdoor pool

https://www.oaka.com.gr/ολυμπιακό-κέντρο-υγρού-στίβου/ανοικτό-κολυμβητήριο/

Yes I loved the outdoor pool at Athens 2004, I ended up going to the Monday night swimming finals and was a glorious electric atmospher :D

Yes, you’re right, the two outdoor pools were permanent and the additional grandstand seating was temporary. I would wander over and watchthe swimmers doing warm up laps in that second pool.

I went over to Athens 2004 and worked as a volunteer there for 3 weeks and had the best time, especially that night at the swimming, seeing Ian Thorpe win a gold medal and some other aussie medallists that night too.

I’ll have to dig up my photos from that beauiful exciting memorable summer in Greece. 

I’ve been to Greece every year since 2003, except for 2020.

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Sorry George_D, I should have clarified. At Athens 2004,  there was 2 outside permanent pools, one 50m  for the swimming competition and one permanent 25m pool in an area between the swimming pool and the next building, which was used for warm-up laps by swimmers and also some of the water polo preliminary rounds.

 There was in fact a third outside permanent pool which was the old diving pool but this was not used at Athens 2004 and was instead covered over to create extra  space for swimming medal presentations and a temporary grandstand.

As you said, there was also the permanent indoor pool as well used for diving and water polo.   Great memories of those ‘Welcome Home Olympic Games’.

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4 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

 

Sorry George_D, I should have clarified. At Athens 2004,  there was 2 outside permanent pools, one 50m  for the swimming competition and one permanent 25m pool in an area between the swimming pool and the next building, which was used for warm-up laps by swimmers and also some of the water polo preliminary rounds.

 There was in fact a third outside permanent pool which was the old diving pool but this was not used at Athens 2004 and was instead covered over to create extra  space for swimming medal presentations and a temporary grandstand.

As you said, there was also the permanent indoor pool as well used for diving and water polo.   Great memories of those ‘Welcome Home Olympic Games’.

Sydney2000 and Athens2004 = Best Olympics ever ! :)

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Coomera Connector: New images of second M1 revealed with construction ‘just around the corner’

Credit:  Gold Coast Bulletin

By Andrew Potts

March 15, 2021 10:14am

 

THIS is how the city’s new $2.4 billion major highway will connect with existing infrastructure and transform the Gold Coast’s northern suburbs. 

New images released by the state government show the Coomera Connector hovering over Arundel’s Napper Road, straddling the Coomera River and crossing through Monterey Keys and Arundel Springs.

HOW COOMERA CONNECTOR WILL TRANSFORM NORTHERN SUBURBS

Transport Minister Mark Bailey said the project was moving at a “rapid pace” ahead of construction beginning mid-year.

“Construction is just around the corner, and these new artist impressions give Gold Coasters an idea of the route, how this project will tackle congestion and important aspects like the shared path and noise barriers,” he said.

“Building on consultation we’ve already done, Gold Coasters can have their say on these new artist impressions and I encourage everyone to have their say.

“In addition to driving our economic recovery, the second M1 will support growth on the northern Gold Coast and free up the M1 for heavy vehicles and people travelling between Brisbane, the coast and Logan.”

Community consultation has launched on Monday on the new images and will run until April 30.

Construction of the first stage is set to begin by July and will run for more than three years.

The Coomera Connector will be a six-lane, 45km arterial road to run from Nerang to Logan.

It is expected to take up to 60,000 vehicles off the M1 every day and was fully gazetted in 2019 by the state government.

The federal government set aside $750 million for the first stage of the arterial road between Nerang and Coomera in the October budget.

It matched the $755 million put forward in September by the Palaszczuk government to fund the 16.6km first stage of the arterial road between Carrara and the Coomera Marine Precinct.

The road, formerly known as the intra-regional transport corridor (IRTC), has long been part of the state government’s future plans to reduce congestion but was dumped by the former Newman government in 2013, against the wishes of the Gold Coast City Council.

The project was restored in 2015, with early scoping works and a $20 million business case having already been completed.

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Venue Locations

Brisbane 2032 Olympics briefing for councillors will require them to to sign confidentiality agreements

Credit:  ABC Radio Brisbane

 
Posted 16 March, 2021

Brisbane City councillors will be required to sign confidentiality agreements before being briefed in detail on expected venue locations for the city's 2032 Olympics bid next week.

Key points:

Brisbane was selected as the sole bid city for exclusive negotiations with the IOC in February

AOC President John Coates will brief Brisbane councillors next week

Councillors must sign a confidentiality agreement ahead of the closed meeting

The council will hold its first closed meeting since 2007 next Tuesday for the special briefing, after the International Olympics Committee in February announced Brisbane had been selected for "exclusive negotiations" to host the 2032 Olympics.

Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner on Tuesday said the meeting was "quite unique" and would give councillors confidential information on the Olympics bid that could affect Brisbane's property prices.

"The information to which councillors will be privy to is not speculation on where venues might go but narrowing down to a more specific decision on where those venues will be," Cr Schrinner said.

"That does have impacts on things like the property market — significant impacts.

"So, councillors will be getting this information before general members of the public, and for that reason, it is important it is confidential."

A letter sent to councillors from the council's chief executive officer Colin Jensen said the special meeting would be limited to councillors and staff who had signed the agreement and would not be live streamed.

Phones and laptops will be taken from participants by security at the start of the meeting and all documents will only be available to councillors in hard copy.

Suggested locations narrowed down

The Olympics vision was announced in February when the IOC laid out plans for 31 venues across South East Queensland, with 21 in Brisbane, six on the Gold Coast and three on the Sunshine Coast, of which the majority will be existing venues.

In all, seven new venues will need to be built for the expected Olympic sports, according to the IOC's feasibility assessment.

Victoria Park in the city centre could be used for equestrian cross-country and BMX freestyle, for instance, while rugby and football could be held at Lang Park, archery at South Bank and hockey at Ballymore Stadium.

Detailed briefing needed

Australian Olympics Committee president John Coates will fly to Brisbane to give councillors a "fulsome" briefing, Cr Schrinner said, as will a representative from Paralympics Australia.

Federal and state representatives, including Queensland Local Government Minister Stirling Hinchliffe, will also be at the briefing.

"Both the State of Queensland and the City of Brisbane will sign a contract with the IOC to host the Olympic Games, obviously if we are successful, for the 2032 Games," Cr Schrinner said.

"It is important, I believe, that all councillors are fully briefed on what is being put forward to the IOC."

Cr Schrinner said the final submission from the three levels of government and the AOC was due in April.

 
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New roads, schools to be mapped out under 10-year Queensland blueprint

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Lydia Lynch

March 16, 2021 — 10.00pm

How to tackle Brisbane bottlenecks and safeguard drinking water in regional Queensland will be part of a review into the state’s long-term infrastructure strategy.

On Wednesday, Deputy Premier Steven Miles will announce plans to overhaul the state’s infrastructure planning, with consultation to begin by the end of the month.

The strategy will set out a 10-year infrastructure vision, but focus on what transport, energy, education, water and health projects must be prioritised during the next four years to meet demand.

Queensland’s population is expected to grow by an extra 1 million people to 6.2 million in the next 10 years before ballooning to 7.1 million in 2041.

Mr Miles said the building blueprint would be made up of seven regional plans and was set to be released by the end of the year.

“The state-wide strategy will set out a more contemporary infrastructure agenda based on economic recovery,” he said.

“The seven regional infrastructure plans will drill down to support recovery and resilience at a regional level.

“These will provide a clear vision for infrastructure investment and prioritisation that will drive economic recovery, boost regional productivity and resilience, and sustain jobs.”

The strategy will map out where new roads and schools need to be built to accommodate south-east Queensland’s rapid population growth.

The last state infrastructure plan was released in 2016 and prioritised the expansion of the Gold Coast light rail to link the hospital to Helensvale station, which was finished in 2017.

The former strategy also planned for land preservation to begin for a high-speed rail link between Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane, which was yet to start and likely would not unless Labor won the next federal election.

A specialist team to ensure land stretching between Tweed Heads and Noosa was able to keep pace with population growth and housing demand, announced earlier this month, would assist with the new strategy.

In the next 20 years, south-east Queensland’s “200-kilometre city” was predicted to expand to about the same size as Sydney today.

In an address to the Infrastructure Association of Queensland breakfast on Wednesday, Mr Miles was also set to announce funding to support growth within two Logan master-planned communities.

Cash from the Building Acceleration Fund, set up to help the state build its way out of recession, would be spent on infrastructure to support two master-planned communities in Logan where populations were at tipping point.

The state government has teamed up with Lendlease to expand its Yarrabilba development, first launched eight years ago.

Mr Miles said the state would contribute $15 million and Lendlease $9.8 million, to increase residential land supply and “enable planning to commence for community and health services”.

“Construction including earthworks, water, sewer, electrical and communications mains, street-scaping and roadworks will support around 100 jobs and pave the way for the site of a new school.

“Access to over 2000 affordable residential lots is expected to be unlocked as part of this infrastructure being progressed.”

A further $15 million would be spent to tackle road congestion around the Brookhaven master-planned community.

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New team behind ‘fundamental rethink’ of Brisbane’s mega-city planning

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Lydia Lynch

March 2, 2021 — 10.00pm

 

A specialist team will be created to ensure land stretching between Tweed Heads and Noosa is able to keep pace with population growth and housing demand.

South-east Queensland’s “200-kilometre city” is predicted to grow by 1.5 million to 5 million in 20 years, making it about the same population as Sydney today.

An extra 794,000 new homes will be needed to accommodate the boom, as the lines between Brisbane and the Gold and Sunshine coasts continue to blur.

The new planning team set up by the state government will be announced by Deputy Premier Steven Miles on Wednesday to ensure new developments can manage the surge in new residents.

“Queenslanders want to know that when they’re ready to buy their first home, they will be able to do so without being priced out of the market,” Mr Miles said.

“They want to know that when they’ve retired and they’re looking to downsize to a more manageable property, that they’ll be able to without needing to move very far away.

“And in between those stages in life they may want a family home with a big backyard.”

Mr Miles said, from 2019 to 2020, there had been a 200 per cent increase in net migration from cities to regional areas.

“We’ve also seen a 23 per cent increase in the use of our national parks and green spaces,” he said.

“This must result in a fundamental rethink of our approach to infrastructure planning and delivery.”

Mr Miles said the team’s first task would be to choose a pilot site for a new growth area by the end of the month.

“The pilot site identified will be an example of how local and state governments and the private sector can work together to plan for better communities,” he said.

“The team will also work to bring land in the under-utilised urban footprint to market sooner.

“Queensland’s population is booming, and I want to ensure our government and local councils can keep up with the increase in demand for land, housing and the supporting infrastructure that comes with it.”

The new Growth Areas Delivery team, will be an arm of state government agency Economic Development Queensland.

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Hosting the Olympics in SEQ would deliver infrastructure bonanza for Coast

Credit: Sunshine Coast News

By Kat Donaghey

26 FEBRUARY 2021

 

Mayor Mark Jamieson is counting on an infrastructure bonanza for the Sunshine Coast if the Olympics comes to South East Queensland in 2032, with better transport connections, new facilities and more jobs.

But a leading property analyst has warned we need to prepare for the growth expected to flow from hosting the global games or face an escalation of the region’s housing crisis.

Brisbane and South East Queensland are considered almost certain to host the Olympics in 2032 after the International Olympic Committee endorsed Australia as the preferred bidder.

Mayor Jamieson, who has been pushing for the event with the Council of Mayors since 2015, said the Games would “supercharge” the Sunshine Coast by fast-tracking big projects and creating new ones.

“This will bring forward the development of our (Maroochydore) City Centre,” he said.

“I would like to think it will bring forward the development of a major convention and exhibition centre.

“Certainly it should ensure that our stadium is finalised. By 2032, we want to be a full stadium with seating for around 24,000 people.”

shutterstock_1891862692-e1614230004586.j Sunshine Coast Stadium could have capacity for 24,000 people by 2032. Picture: Shutterstock

Mayor Jamieson said he wanted one of the lasting legacies of the Games to be better transport infrastructure for the Sunshine Coast.

“The Games will come and go and they’ll be fantastic … they’ll put Australia on show to the rest of the world,” he said.

“But but what’s really important is the focus on infrastructure and using that to bring forward … investment in transportation.

“That’s always been the objective of the Council of Mayors and that remains our objective.

“In 11 years time, there’ll be at least another 1 million people move to South East Queensland, probably more, and that requires much improved transportation and that’s our objective.”

Mayor Jamieson said the rail duplication to Nambour should be on the list as well as “outstanding connectivity” between the Sunshine Coast and Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Toowoomba, Ipswich and Moreton Bay.

He said more people would move to the Coast for jobs and lifestyle, and the exposure of our region beaming into television screens around the world was something money could not buy.

“We are seeing incredible growth at the moment as a consequence of the COVID crisis and people seeing the Sunshine Coast as a very safe area to be.

“Adding the Olympic Games to that I think will prove the place as being more attractive to people and we will see more people come here.”

However, Direct Collective chief operating officer Mal Cayley said the Olympics would be a double-edged sword, bringing jobs and growth, but exacerbating an already worrying housing crisis.

Mr Cayley said the COVID pandemic had accelerated the current housing crisis he had predicted would happen by three to five years.

He said the Olympics would also shower the city in new infrastructure a decade ahead of time, which would create more jobs and attract more people who would have to compete in an already under-supplied housing market.

Mr Cayley warned of an “extended housing crisis” that could last for years, with people living in tent cities, unless all stakeholders came together to find solutions before the next wave of growth.

He said the Sunshine Coast was suffering the “most significant undersupply” of housing of any top 10 city in Australia “probably in history”.

“Unless we start immediate discussions and get solutions in place, what we could see are little tent cities popping up around the place because we need to house people in the short-term,” he said.

“It could be two to three years at crisis level.”

“We need to start discussions at every level to find solutions,” he said, adding that vocal minority groups that were opposed to development should not be allowed to drive the agenda.

“We don’t want over-development but we need a sophisticated response to the challenge.”

 
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Mayors demand transport deal

A high-powered coalition of Queensland mayors is calling on the Prime Minister to push through a deal they say will unlock the Brisbane 2032 Olympics.

Credit: The Chronicle

By Dan Knowles

March 16, 2021 - 11:02PM

A high-powered coalition of Queensland mayors is calling on the Prime Minister to push through a deal they say will unlock the Brisbane 2032 Olympics.

The SEQ Council of Mayors says a City Deal would outline a timetable of new roads, rail and public transport that the region is desperately crying out for as well has help secure the 2032 Olympics and Paralympics.

The 20-year agreement between three levels of government and industry was due for completion last year, the 11 council mayors headed by Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner say, but it stalled with COVID and delayed Federal and State Budgets.

Cr Schrinner said without significant transport investment through an SEQ City Deal, the region’s public transport network would struggle to cater for population growth let alone the additional load of a Brisbane 2032 Games.

“This delegation to Canberra will focus on one clear message to our Commonwealth counterparts, it’s time to finalise the SEQ City Deal and deliver the infrastructure the region needs to support its growing population,” Cr Schrinner said.

“As we edge closer to a potential host decision for the 2032 Games, the region needs to demonstrate it can deliver a fast, efficient and reliable public transport network that is able to support the growth of South East Queensland.

“As part of the International Olympic Committee’s recent Brisbane 2032 announcement, it acknowledged how important the SEQ City Deal is to our proposal. It will be a powerful tool in ensuring the region is ready to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.”

The mayors are expected to meet with Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Deputy PM Michael McCormack and Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese as well as Cities Minister Paul Fletcher.

A spokesperson for Cities Minister Paul Fletcher said the City Deal had been postponed last year by agreement but was moving again.


“Last year the South East Queensland City Deal partners agreed to postpone development of the deal until 2021 because of the impacts of COVID,” they said.

“Work has now restarted and a productive meeting was held last week between Minister Fletcher for the Commonwealth, Deputy Premier Miles for Queensland and Lord Mayor Schrinner for the SEQ Council of Mayors.

“The meeting reviewed progress to date and agreed that all three levels of government would keep working towards developing and agreeing the terms of a South East Queensland City Deal.”

Brisbane was named preferred candidate by the International Olympic Committee to host the 2032 Olympic Games last month, with IOC president Thomas Bach saying the International Olympic Committee’s Executive Board had voted unanimously to support a recommendation from the Future Host Commission to enter into a targeted dialogue with Brisbane’s bid committee and the Australian Olympic Committee.

Securing the Games would create more than 100,000 new jobs and priceless international tourism exposure, bid organisers have told The Courier-Mail, turbocharge the economic recovery from COVID statewide as well as committing governments to a deadline to build and open the roads and rail the southeast needs.

The SEQ Council of Mayors proposed a Games bid to fast-track public transport with a feasibility study which gathered momentum on the back of The Courier-Mail’s Future SEQ campaign that warned the southeast risked grinding to a halt as major roads hit peak congestion by the early 2030s as the population grew from 3.5m to 5.5m people.

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Can Rowing / Canoeing be held at a SEQ Venue instead of Sydney in 2032?

Below is an excerpt from an article from ‘The Australian’ titled “Brisbane passes next step on journey to 2032 Olympics” about holding the Rowing / Canoe (sprint) competitons not at the Sydney 2000 venue, but at Wyaralong, west of Beaudesert, Queensland.

The article appeared in The Australian on March 12, 2021

By Wayne Smith, Senior Sports Writer

4:31PM MARCH 12, 2021

There was some suggestion at the Session that Australian organisers were considering taking part of the Olympics — specifically rowing — back to the Penrith venue used for the 2000 Sydney Games but, on reflection, this idea has been abandoned.

It was quashed primarily because Sydney would be too cold for an Olympics held in the July 23-August 8 window envisaged by the Brisbane planners. Moreover, as one of the Games’ major sports, it also was hoped that rowing in Queensland would be left with a legacy venue to hold major events.

With privately-owned Larapinta being ruled out, the rowing venue almost certainly will be at Wyaralong, west of Beaudesert, where Australian titles and King’s Cup regattas already have been contested. It would entail building a temporary Village at the lake for rowers, as was done at Penrith for the 2000 Games, but this is not regarded as a major obstacle.

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The story of the Temporary Pool at the 2007 FINA World Swimming Championships in Melbourne’s Rod Laver Arena

With Brisbane/SEQ’s 2032 swimming competition tipped to be held in a temporary pool installed in the Brisbane Live indoor arena, this is the story behind a similar installation at Melbourne’s Rod Laver Arena in 2007.

________________________________________________

Melbourne's slam dunk

Credit: The Age

By Chris Johnston
December 8, 2006 — 7.45am

OUT at sea today, somewhere just this side of Singapore, is a freight ship. On that ship are 40 containers. They hold the precious cargo that, in 99 days, will be unveiled as the remarkable kitset pools for Melbourne’s glamour world swimming championships.

The pools are called "skypools" and there are two of them. At the moment, encased within the containers fl oating on a ship, they’re in pieces like giant Meccano sets, about 500 pieces in all — galvanised steel panels, lengths of steel cable and thousands of metres of rubber lining. They will arrive at the Port of Melbourne any time from Tuesday next week.

Then they will wait, untouched, until February 9, when, in an unprecedented, almost unthinkable feat of engineering and logistics, they’ll be installed at the Rod Laver Arena.

This will mark the first time a temporary competition swimming pool has been installed in an existing stadium in the southern hemisphere. Rod Laver is the home of tennis, of course: the Australian Open. And big rock concerts. Classical music concerts. Motorcycle supercross. And now swimming.

"It is hard to imagine," admits Michael Scott, the event’s chief executive. "Melbourne people are so used to the Rod Laver Arena being for things other than swimming. But when the average punter comes in it will look like the pool has always been there.

"I don’t have the conceptual skills like some people do," said Scott, a former head of the AIS in Canberra. "I fi nd it a little hard to visualise myself. But we’re all looking forward to seeing it in the flesh."

The only way to conceive of it 99 days out is to imagine. Think of the main tennis court at Rod Laver, the one where Serena and Lleyton and Roger and Amelie do their thing with racquets and balls. Now strip all those things away and imagine it as a pit. One of the kitset pools — the competition pool — goes into this pit.

The other, for the swimmers to warm up in, will be in an adjoining indoor area where the practice tennis courts usually are. But this competition pool, constructed from the galvanised steel panels, once they’re joined together on site, doesn’t sit on the tennis court pit’s surface. Instead, it is held above the ground by a complex system of cross-hatched cables that suspends it. The pool effectively "floats", hence the name "skypool".

The cables also act as tensioners to correct any sway on the pool from the immense pressure exerted by nearly 4000 cubic metres of water. These cables, says Pedro Arrebola, a director of the Barcelona company Astral Pool, who invented the "skypool", are the key to its construction.

They prevent movement, and allow correction in the case of movement, and they mean a concrete base for a temporary pool doesn’t have to be built in a permanent stadium. "The pools go in suspended without drilling a single hole in the ground," Arrebola says.

The pool’s heaters, pumps and filter systems sit in the void between the tennis court surface and the bottom of the temporary pool. Because the competition pool is raised, the front row of seats will be roughly at water level. Organisers expect about 11,000 spectators to the big swimming races.

The technology was developed by Astral Pool’s head engineer, Xiyivr Yila, for the 2003 swimming world titles in Spain. It was also used at the world titles in Shanghai this year. The pools do not cost the Melbourne event anything because Astral Pool is a major sponsor of FINA and is obliged to supply them for free.

Yila will be in Melbourne to oversee the Rod Laver Arena operation, which will take about a month, starting not long after the Australian Open ends, using 10 technicians from Barcelona and about 30 Melbourne labourers. The last event before the pools go in is an Eric Clapton concert, on February 4.

The event, under the auspices of the sport’s international governing body FINA, runs from March 17 until April 1. It features 2500 athletes in five aquatic sports — swimming, diving, open-water swimming, water polo and synchronised swimming.

Only swimming and synchronised swimming will be held in the drop-in pool at Rod Laver. Water polo and diving will be at the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre, which will be extended at a cost of $2 million following an edict from FINA. Open-water swimming is at St Kilda Beach.

The likes of Grant Hackett, Libby Lenton, American superfish Michael Phelps and Dutch master Pieter van den Hoogenband will swim in the drop-in pool. Arrebola said another skypool innovation — the overflow channel on all four sides — meant the water surface would be flat and fast because ripples would be reduced.

After the FINA event finishes on April 1, the pools will be dismantled, packed away and sent back to Barcelona. Organisers have until April 17 to return the stadium to normal.

It adds to an already busy March for Melbourne; FINA already overlaps with one day of the Grand Prix and round one of the AFL 2007 season.

Also in March is Moomba, the Food and Wine Festival, the Melbourne- Osaka Yacht race, and the International Flower and Garden Show.

There’s also the question of water. The two skypools hold 6 million litres of Melbourne mains water, which will be heated and treated once it is in the pools. What to do with it afterwards, in a drought? Truck it to the Wimmera? Top up the reservoirs?

In one of his first public statements, the Bracks Government’s new Sports Minister, James Merlino, said he was "acutely aware of the current water crisis facing Victoria and totally committed to re-using every drop of water from the temporary pools at next year’s FINA World Championships".

The Government was deciding what to do with it, he said, and how to extract the chemicals put in before the swimming to make it useful again. It would announce a decision early in 2007.

The Botanic Gardens and the grasslands around Olympic Park have been cited as possible beneficiaries. So was the MCG, but it has been taken off the list. The kitset pools, meanwhile, empty for now and in 450 pieces, are confined to their containers on that ship just beyond Singapore.

AT A GLANCE

THE FINA SKYPOOLS AT ROD LAVER ARENA

A "suspended" 50-metre, 10-lane, Olympic-size swimming pool will be built inside Rod Laver Arena for the 2007 World Swimming Championships.

■ The first five rows of seats in the arena will be covered by decking and will not be used.
■ The front row of spectators will be close to water level.
■ The competition pool is made from 350 galvanised steel panels. The pool will be lined with rubber.
■ A warm-up pool will be built on top of the indoor practice courts. The pools will contain 6 million litres of water, which will be recycled after the event.
■ The pools are the first temporary pools to be installed in an existing sports stadium in the southern hemisphere. Both will be dismantled and removed after the championships.
■ Specially developed overflow channels keep the water surface flat for faster swimming.
■ No concreting or bolts are used and the pools are considered to be like a giant Meccano set.
■ Because the pools are "suspended" the bottom does not sit on the tennis court surface.
■ They were built in Barcelona and are being shipped to Melbourne as prefabricated pieces.
■ They will be assembled from February 9 to March 5.

_______________________________________________________________
 

 

This story below from Melbourne Olympic Parks:

Rod Laver Arena’s 30th Anniversary March Memory

A remarkable transformation saw the venue’s floor transformed into an Olympic-sized swimming pool to host the 2007 FINA World Swimming Championships.

To construct the temporary swimming pool, structures called ‘skypools’ were brought in from Barcelona, Spain.

The skypools were made of ‘galvanised steel panels, lengths of steel cable and thousands of metres of rubber lining’ which were joined together to hold 6 million litres of water.

The competition pool did not actually sit on the tennis court, it was held suspended above the ground by a complex system of cross-hatched cables.

This was the first time a temporary competition swimming pool had been installed in an existing stadium in the southern hemisphere.

When swimming legend Susie O’Neill viewed the pool (which was named after her) she commented:

“When I first walked into the Rod Laver Arena a month ago, I could barely imagine just how it might look now and I can say without any doubt that this is one of the most exciting international swimming venues I have ever seen.

“I’m just really-excited and proud. I can’t wait to pop in the water.”

(The Age, 11 March 2007)

FINA-world-swimming-championships-Swim-3

 

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Inside the $3.6 billion Queen’s Wharf development

Credit: The Courier Mail

By Jeremy Pierce, Tourism Reporter, Gold Coast Bureau

March 17, 2021 - 10:00PM

 

From a hole in the ground to the jewel in the crown – the multibillion-dollar Queen’s Wharf development is set to send Brisbane bolting into the future. 

The Courier-Mail has been granted exclusive access to the CBD building site where the $3.6 billion Queen’s Wharf is literally rising before our eyes.

While most of the structures under construction stand only a few levels above the CBD streets, the sheer size of the project means the work already completed is the equivalent of two 60-storey buildings.

It is just over 18 months since work started on the game-changing project, with artist impressions of some of the development’s signature features slowly transforming to reality.

Already 26 Olympic swimming pools worth of concrete has been poured while 8700 tonnes of reinforced steel has been installed.

Construction of the level five precinct is already underway, with work starting on a pedestrian bridge which will soar above the Riverside Expressway and across the Brisbane River.

The monumental operation of fitting the bridge segments above the expressway is expected to take just one day.

Already, 600 workers are involved in the construction phase, with that number expected to increase to some 1,500 by the end of the year when the tradesmen arrive on-site.

Towers 2 and 3 The Star Grand will top out January 2022, with Tower 1, the Rosewood and Dorsett hotels to top out at 200 metres by the middle of next year.

Nine historic buildings in the precinct will be incorporated into the development, including the existing hotel and casino structures which will form part of a new Ritz Carlton hotel and retain spaces, while the old Department of Primary Industries building, Brisbane's original Immigration headquarters from 1865, is earmarked for a microbrewery.

The first part of the development, featuring hotels, restaurants and entertainment venues, is on track to open late next year, delivering up to 8000 jobs and bringing an estimated 1.39 million additional visitors to Brisbane.

The Destination Brisbane Consortium project, a joint-venture between Star Entertainment and Hong Kong-based Chow Tai Fook Enterprises and Far East Consortium

Star is also busily transforming the company’s Gold Coast casino into a mini-Manhattan of apartment and resort towers.

Star CEO Matt Bekier said Queen’s Wharf would become one of Brisbane’s most prized assets.

Concept art

Concept art

March 17, 2021

March 17, 2021

“We’re delivering a project that will change the face of Brisbane,” he said.

“It’s a privilege to have that responsibility and we will deliver a tourism and entertainment destination of which Queenslanders can be justifiably proud.

“The vision is now becoming reality.

“From late next year this will be a must-visit location for locals, interstate and hopefully by then international visitors.

“At a time when we’re looking to rebuild the economy, Queen’s Wharf will provide an economic stimulus led by employment opportunities.”

Destination Brisbane Consortium project director Simon Crooks said the precinct would be a huge focal point for the river city at a key moment in its history.

“It is exciting times ahead for Brisbane with the development now clearly on people’s radar as it quickly takes shape,” he said.

“Already we’ve locked in a major retailer (DFS) in the Printery Building, with our attention turning to the heritage buildings and the more than 50 bars, restaurants and cafes within the precinct.

“Queen’s Wharf will light up the evenings and turn an under-utilised section of the CBD into a thriving entertainment hub.”

Meanwhile, Star’s Gold Coast expansion also continues apace, with a 53-storey Dorsett hotel and apartment tower on track to open early next year while a second hotel and apartment tower is slated to open two years later.

By the time the second tower opens, The Star Gold Coast precinct will offer nearly 1200 rooms and suites across four hotels in what would be an Australian first.

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Just throwing this idea out there- the World University Games (Universiade) have never been in Oceania. Could Brisbane bid for the games to help lead in and prepare for the 2032 Olympics? 2025 is the first year where there isn't a host as yet.

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53 minutes ago, Victorian said:

Just throwing this idea out there- the World University Games (Universiade) have never been in Oceania. Could Brisbane bid for the games to help lead in and prepare for the 2032 Olympics? 2025 is the first year where there isn't a host as yet.

I'd prefer to see them host the World Athletics Championships and FINA World Championships and they've both been mentioned as goals in the media since Brisbane was announcd as preferred candidate.

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6 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

 

The story of the Temporary Pool at the 2007 FINA World Swimming Championships in Melbourne’s Rod Laver Arena

 

really interesting stuff. thanks for sharing that

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3 hours ago, Victorian said:

Just throwing this idea out there- the World University Games (Universiade) have never been in Oceania. Could Brisbane bid for the games to help lead in and prepare for the 2032 Olympics? 2025 is the first year where there isn't a host as yet.

Germany has all but been awarded the 2025 Summer Universaide from my understanding. North Carolina also recently announced their bid for the 2027 Summer Universaide. So perhaps Brisbane could consider 2029 or 2031 if they wanted to use the Universaide as a test event.

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Coates plans to retire from AOC, wants to oversee Brisbane Games

By Aaron Patrick on Mar 19, 2021 – 3.43pm

The IOC has selected Brisbane as the preferred candidate for the 2032 Games, and could ratify the decision at a meeting of all 103 members just before the opening of the Tokyo Olympic Games in July.

Mr Coates’ position in the international movement would automatically make him a board member of the Brisbane Games organising committee until 2024.

After that, it would probably be up to the Queensland government to decide if the veteran sports administrator would remain on the committee, which might be known as BOCOG.

“It’s up to them if they want to find a place for me after that,” he told AFR Weekend. “I think I have plenty to offer, or if along the way I didn’t think I had anything to offer I’d pull the plug at the appropriate time.”

Mr Coates declined to name his preferred successor at the Australian Olympic Committee, but praised several board members, including Australian Sailing president Matt Allen, Athletics Australia president Mark Arbib, Volleyball Australia president Craig Carracher, Winter Olympic team chef de mission Ian Chesterman, Gymnastics Australia chief executive Kitty Chiller, Olympic fencer Evelyn Halls and Diving Australia chair Michael Murphy.

 

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Coomera Connector: New images of second M1 revealed with construction ‘just around the corner’

Credit:  Gold Coast Bulletin

By Andrew Potts

March 19, 2021 9:06am

 

THIS is how the city’s new $2.4 billion major highway will connect with existing infrastructure and transform the Gold Coast’s northern suburbs. 

New images released by the state government show the Coomera Connector hovering over Arundel’s Napper Road, straddling the Coomera River and crossing through Monterey Keys and Arundel Springs.

However Bulletin readers remain unconvinced.

“Will be a useless piece of ugly infrastructure, will still bottle neck at either end, put the money in to a decent public transport system, isn’t the idea to get cars off the road?,” Cam Wise wrote.

James Stuart Sparks added: “Either build the access or choke the current roads, people are hardly keeping the population down.”

Allan Mcdonnell is on board.

“There’s more trees and wildlife being displaced by the housing estates being allowed to be developed than this road ever will, but that’s why we need it,” he wrote.


New artist impression of the Coomera Connector at Napper Road New artist impression of the Coomera Connector at Napper Road

Transport Minister Mark Bailey said the project was moving at a “rapid pace” ahead of construction beginning mid-year.

“Construction is just around the corner, and these new artist impressions give Gold Coasters an idea of the route, how this project will tackle congestion and important aspects like the shared path and noise barriers,” he said.

“Building on consultation we’ve already done, Gold Coasters can have their say on these new artist impressions and I encourage everyone to have their say.

“In addition to driving our economic recovery, the second M1 will support growth on the northern Gold Coast and free up the M1 for heavy vehicles and people travelling between Brisbane, the coast and Logan.”

Community consultation has launched on Monday on the new images and will run until April 30.

Construction of the first stage is set to begin by July and will run for more than three years.

The Coomera Connector will be a six-lane, 45km arterial road to run from Nerang to Logan.

It is expected to take up to 60,000 vehicles off the M1 every day and was fully gazetted in 2019 by the state government.

The federal government set aside $750 million for the first stage of the arterial road between Nerang and Coomera in the October budget.

It matched the $755 million put forward in September by the Palaszczuk government to fund the 16.6km first stage of the arterial road between Carrara and the Coomera Marine Precinct.

The new road crossing the Coomera River The new road crossing the Coomera River

The road, formerly known as the intra-regional transport corridor (IRTC), has long been part of the state government’s future plans to reduce congestion but was dumped by the former Newman government in 2013, against the wishes of the Gold Coast City Council.

The project was restored in 2015, with early scoping works and a $20 million business case having already been completed.

How the Coomera Connector will appear at The Shores
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1 hour ago, ulu said:

After that, it would probably be up to the Queensland government to decide if the veteran sports administrator would remain on the committee, which might be known as BOCOG.

 

 

it would be madness to not keep him on BOGOG  - his experiance and connections alone would be worth it

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‘An opportunity for Qld’: SEQ must build legacy if Games bid successful, Olympics boss says

 

credit: brisbane times

 

By Tony Moore
March 19, 2021 — 5.45pm
 
 

In the lead-up to the 2032 Olympic Games, national and international sporting bodies should base themselves in south-east Queensland, the preferred host bidder, Australia’s Olympics boss said during a visit to Brisbane on Friday.

The idea was one of 20 economic and cultural potential legacies of the 2032 Games proposed by the Committee for Brisbane, if the region was confirmed as the host of the Games of the XXXV Olympiad.

 

The Committee for Brisbane is a think-tank that examines urban planning issues in south-east Queensland.

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates said the region would attract athletes, coaches, teams and officials for training and competition in the lead-up to the Games.

 

He said planning ahead would allow the region to take better advantage of these moves.

“Legacy is far more than the physical venues,” Mr Coates said.

 

“Legacy is something that doesn’t just happen after an event. It is something you have to plan for.

“You get the benefit on the way through to the event and then afterwards, the planning should carry you through afterwards.”

Mr Coates said Sydney had staged a successful 2000 Olympics, but it could be argued it did not plan well for its legacy.

On the sporting front, Mr Coates said Brisbane should make a concerted effort to attract national and international representative squads to train in the region for competitions held overseas.

“For example, the proximity of Queensland going into the Tokyo [Olympics]; it is going to be very good for teams to be able to train in the better months up here,” he said.

Mr Coates said he hoped international sports squads would view Brisbane in the same way as international businesses that first set up offices in Melbourne and Sydney, before setting up offices in Brisbane.

“A lot of Australia’s big companies move from Melbourne to Sydney, or at least have large offices in Sydney,” he said.

 

Mr Coates said the Queensland capital was attracting international and national businesses to headquarter in Brisbane and said sports squads should follow.

“That is an opportunity for Queensland and I hope the Department of Sport, the Queensland Academy of Sport and all the sports federations take the opportunities the Games might present to improve their pathways for young kids.

“We are really on the doorstep to Asia, is the way I put it, and there really are a lot of opportunities there.”

More than 2 million extra people were expected to be living in south-east Queensland over the next 25 years, making it one of Australia’s more compact urban centres.

The AFL moved all non-Victorian teams to south-east Queensland for 10 weeks during the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, followed by the Supercars motor racing teams.

 

South-east Queensland hosted the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, the AFL grand final at the Gabba in September 2020, while Melbourne Storm was based on the Sunshine Coast during the height of the pandemic last year.

Brisbane will also host games at the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2023.

South-east Queensland’s 2032 Olympics Games bid includes some new Olympic venues, with a stadium most likely at Albion Raceway, and a proposed Games Village at Hamilton Northshore.

Mr Coates said Brisbane needed to work hard to position itself because 170 sports events had been staged throughout the world in 2020 despite the impact of COVID-19.

 

He said the region’s liveability was its advantage.

“It’s a lifestyle with good schooling, but you’ve got to get out and sell yourself,” he said.

The Committee for Brisbane also supported the concept of recycling Games infrastructure into housing, like how the Commonwealth Games Athletes Village at Southport was repurposed.

Among the other goals for south-east Queensland from the 2032 Olympics were:

  • road and rail connectivity;
  • regional data and digital competency;
  • First Nations recognition and exclusivity and enterprise;
  • health and well-being, including mental health;
  • investments in arts and culture;
  • improved environmental standards;
  • repurpose 2032 Games infrastructure for affordable housing; and
  • aim for zero net waste in Australia’s first circular economy by 2032.

The International Olympic Committee installed Brisbane as preferred candidate for the 2032 Games last month.

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TRANSFERRED FROM BUDAPEST 2032 THREAD:

(21 March, 2021)

4 hours ago, Nacre said:      

I don't hate anything about Brisbane's plan. For me this is not an emotional issue . . .

Many of those venues are not able to meet the technical requirements of the Olympics. The larger issue, though, is that Brisbane does not meet the requirements for tourism infrastructure. Brisbane only has about a third of the required number of hotel rooms for the Summer Olympics, for example.

Brisbane would not have been chosen in a competitive bid process based on technical merits. It may very well be successful in establishing a new format for host cities with a much smaller burden of international fans and new venue construction. And I personally hope that happens, because it is what the Olympics need. But it is demonstrably true that Brisbane's hotel capacity, airport, and venues cannot compare with those of cities like London, Paris, Los Angeles, Tokyo or Beijing.

If you cut the required number of hotel rooms and venue capacities (and thus overall fan numbers) by two thirds, then Budapest could also host the summer Olympics successfully.

______________________________________________________________________________
 

(21 March, 2021)

5 minutes ago, AustralianFan said:      

No part of Brisbane’s Bid or the IOC’s Assessment involves a comparison with other cities around the world and such comparisons are seriously irrelevant to Brisbane/SEQ’s capabilities.

The IOC did do a Technical Assessment of Brisbane/SEQ’s plans, beginning at Page 18 of 63 page IOC Feasibility Assessment, including use of the many existing facilities such as the Sydney 2000 rowing/sprint canoeing/whitewater venue for instance.

Brisbane/SEQ was chosen exclusively as Preferred Bidder on the IOC’s Technical Assessment on 24 February 2021.

Your assertion: 

Brisbane does not meet the requirements for tourism infrastructure.  Brisbane only has about a third of the required number of hotel rooms for the Summer Olympics

Totally Incorrect.  I did advise you to read the IOC Report and I gave you the link to it.

Brisbane/SEQ has more than enough right now.

 

See ‘Accommodation’ - page 54, IOC Feasibility Assessment, as follows:

The Games needs 42,000 rooms (2-5 stars for Games stakeholders).

Hotel Accommodation

Existing:   Brisbane 20,000 rooms

                  Gold Coast 20,000 rooms

                  Sunshine Coast 9,200 rooms

                 Total:   49,200

Other Accommodation

Existing:    Airbnb and Cabins

                  Brisbane 7,500

                  Gold Coast 7,400

                  Sunshine Coast 6,200

The IOC has assessed there are more than enough of all types of accommodation right now.

New Dedicaed Cruise Ship Terminal

Brisbane also opened a new dedicated standalone cruise ship terminal in 2020 which will likely add further accommodation at Games time. 

 

See also page 57, IOC Assessment of Brisbane - Transport 

The IOC said “Meets Games needs”.

Brisbane Airport

New second runway opened 2020 / Capacity 43 million per year - 24,000 per hour

Gold Coast Airport

Capacity 6.4 million per year / Terminal expansion started

Sunshine Coast Airport   3.5 million per year / new second runway opened 2020

 

Your assertion:

Many of those venues are not able to meet the technical requirements of the Olympics.

What the ? Seriously, where did you pull that one from? Totally incorrect.

Of course all venues will be at Olympic standard at Games time. Never in question. 

IOC, page 44: “Almost all venues have already been discussed with the respective International Federations”.

 

Your assertion:

Brisbane's hotel capacity, airport, and venues cannot compare with those of cities like London, Paris, Los Angeles, Tokyo or Beijing.”

Seriously? As Aussies say, this is not a pissing contest. 

It is the IOC’s Assessment of Brisbane/SEQ’s Bid including existing and planned facilities.

 

Brisbane/SEQ 2032 venue capacities

Page 24 of IOC Report:

Brisbane Zone:

Brisbane Olympic Stadium (new)    50,000

or use existing at Carrara, CWG 2018 venue for athletics with temporary grandstands

Existing Gabba for ceremonies 40,000 is an option

Swimming/Water Polo - new 15,000

Other aquatics - existing 4,300

Archery - temporary 4,000

Basketball - new 15,000

Basketball 3x3 - existing 4,500

Boxing - existing 6,000

Canoe slalom whitewater - new 8,000 (IOC advises to consider using existing Sydney 2000 venue)

Cycling - existing 5,000 (some works required)

BMX - temporary 5,000

Equestrian  - temporary 25,000 and existing 15,000

Hockey - 2 existing venues @15,000 each - temporary seating

Handball - existing 11,000

Modern Penthalon - existing 20,000

Rowing/Canoe - new venue 14,000 (IOC advises to consider using existing Sydney 2000 venue)

Sailing - existing 10,000

Tennis - existing 6,000 + 4,000 + 2,000

 

Gold Coast Zone:

Beach Volleyball - temporary 12,000

Golf - existing 15,000

Judo/Wrestling - existing 7,500

Triathlon/Aquatics - temporary 5,000

Volleyball - existing 11,000

Volleyball/Weightlifting - existing 6,000 + 5,000

 

Sunshine Coast Zone:

Basketball preliminaries - new 6,000 (IOC said this venuevnot needed)

Cycling/Athletics/Kiteboard Sailing - temporary 5,000

Mountain Bike - existing 10,000

Sailing keelboat - existing 2,000

 

Football Preliminaries: - all existing venues

Brisbane 20,000

Gold Coast 27,400

Sunshine Coast 20,000

Toowoomba 20,000

Townsville 25,000

Cairns 20,000

Sydney 42,500

Melbourne 30,000

*************************************

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to those coming in here and having a moan about Brisbane 2032:

 

look at this from the IOC's point of view

 

you have a country with a successful history of hosting international sporting events - at one point they hosted what the IOC president called "the best games ever", along with sports such as the commonwealth games, and other various events.

this city that is putting there hand up has support from all 3 levels of government, large public support and no need for a referendum. Approx 80% of the venues already exist 11 years out.

your also struggling for hosts, so much so you award your last two games in one swoop to lock in 2 hosts.

on the other hand you have potential bids from Qatar (way too hot), Germany (no where near at the level of the Australian bid at this time), India and indonesia (no way they would go either of these after the debacle of Rio) and a combined north and south korea bid (fanciful at best, could go nuclear hot)

suddenly Brisbane does not look too bad

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