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Ahem, he's not the only one against Brisbane holding the Games, in fact, judging by the comments posted on Nine, Ten and Seven's Facebook pages, there's a pretty hefty desire to literally cut Australia off from the rest of the world forever, take Australia out of international events/organizations and permanently ban travel to and from the country to keep viruses like COVID out of the country, and if that means becoming a hermit state, so be it. That's the views of the posters, not mine, just to be clear.

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Very exciting!!!! This is real now!!!    A live in Melbourne and as much as I love my city, I would’ve had soccer in Queensland instead. A missed opportunity to not have Metricon Stadium used. 

IOC EB Meetings aren’t broadcast. There is a press conference after each one that can be accessed via the IOC Media YouTube Channel. IOC Sessions are generally broadcast to the same channel and O

in my day job i'm a lawyer and in the past ive dealt with domain name disputes. i can tell you know auDA will roll over and turn over any .com.au domains with a quick lawyers letter, especilly when so

2 minutes ago, LinkParkFn said:

Ahem, he's not the only one against Brisbane holding the Games, in fact, judging by the comments posted on Nine, Ten and Seven's Facebook pages, there's a pretty hefty desire to literally cut Australia off from the rest of the world forever, take Australia out of international events/organizations and permanently ban travel to and from the country to keep viruses like COVID out of the country, and if that means becoming a hermit state, so be it. That's the views of the posters, not mine, just to be clear.

 

Of course that happened.

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3 minutes ago, LinkParkFn said:

Ahem, he's not the only one against Brisbane holding the Games, in fact, judging by the comments posted on Nine, Ten and Seven's Facebook pages, there's a pretty hefty desire to literally cut Australia off from the rest of the world forever, take Australia out of international events/organizations and permanently ban travel to and from the country to keep viruses like COVID out of the country, and if that means becoming a hermit state, so be it. That's the views of the posters, not mine, just to be clear.

Thank goodness, these decisions are not made based on blogging comments on  whatever media platform.

Three indicators show clearly that a majority of Queenslanders support the Olympics coming to the state.

One of those polls was the recent Queensland State Election won in a landslide by this Olympics Government.

The second was The Courier Mail’s recent opinion poll which found that 60% of Queenslanders support the Olympics coming to the state.

A third indicator is that the infamous petition by Pauline Hanson’s party to cancel the Bid was signed by a paltry 5,003 from a state population of 5.174 million Queenslanders.

The IOC has taken note of the majority support, actually specifically mentioned it in their Assessment Report ahead of the recent announcement and is now on the cusp of voting to award the 2032 Games to Queenland.

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I know it is early BUT

Sally Pearson surely is the one to light the cauldron

What performances would be at the ceremonies? Would they focus on Queensland artists or bring in other Aussie artists too?

I was at the Commonwealth Games 2018 ceremony and was shocked there was no Waltzing Matilda or those famous australian songs. Maybe there is an aussie song medley? I thought the national anthem was done well though.

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Brisbane Olympic athletes’ village could be modelled on Gold Coast success

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Tony Moore

March 8, 2021 — 3.57pm

 

If you want to imagine how the Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games athletes’ village might look and operate, glance about 80 kilometres to the south on the Gold Coast.

More than 2500 people now live in the build-to-rent community Smith Collective at Southport, which has evolved over three years from the 2018 Commonwealth Games athletes’ village.

By July, the community’s population will be about 3000. All residents are renting for between six months and two years.

With Hamilton Northshore emerging as a potential Brisbane Games athletes’ village, the transition at Southport shows how the state government-owned riverside land could transition from Olympics infrastructure to a residential and commercial precinct.

Both parcels of land are managed by the property arm of the state government’s Economic Development Queensland.

At Southport, between 2012 and 2018, EDQ oversaw the development of 30 hectares into the 2018 Commonwealth Games athletes’ village precinct.

Here, one small success story is Datarwe, a start-up that provides a data platform for researching patient care. It won a $1.5 million grant from the Queensland government’s Department of Innovation.

Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct business development manager Kathy Kruger described it as a “precision-data medicine platform that looks at all the data that comes out of intensive care units”.

“It de-identifies that data but it uses the cumulative data to predict better outcomes for patients going through intensive care units,” she said.

Hamilton, a suburb about six kilometres north-east of the Brisbane CBD, is firming as the site for the 14,000-bed athletes’ village should Brisbane win the bid to host the 2032 Olympic Games.

The site is on the bank of the Brisbane River, between Hamilton Portside and the Gateway Bridge, and stretches back from the river towards Kingsford Smith Drive.

In total, 1251 units were built in 19 apartment towers to house 6000 athletes in a mix of one-, two- and three-bedroom units.

Today, 17 of the 19 former athletes’ village towers have been transformed, with kitchen facilities added, into modern one-, two- and three-bedroom units that are all rented.

The residential transformation was completed by James Lang LaSalle, which appointed Grocon to do the work, and subsequently enlisted real estate company Smith Collective to rent and manage the new community.

These 17 towers are 80 per cent full. COVID-19 slowed things last year, but it has since bounced back.

The concept had two steps.

The first was to renovate the buildings in the athletes’ village, occupying about 16 hectares of the precinct, and then renting the units out. The prices are mid-range.

The second step was maximising the commercial opportunities from the nearby Griffith University and Gold Coast University Hospital.

Smith Collective general manager Matt Taplin said the build-to-rent scheme was popular because, while housing was in demand, “not everybody wants to buy a house”.

“For a lot of people, home ownership does not feature in the future at the moment,” Mr Taplin said.

“Renting has always been a part of what people do when they enter the workforce and from the other side renting is where a lot of people feel comfortable as they approach retirement.

“They free up equity, or perhaps they never had the chance to gain it.”

Renting at Australia’s 2018 Commonwealth Games athletes’ village at Southport

  • 1251 apartments in 19 buildings at Village Boulevard at Southport
  • The buildings are the former athletes’ rooms but have been transformed
  • The rent is $380 for a one-bedroom unit and $420 for a two-bedroom unit
  • A three-bedroom townhouse rents for $595
  • It is 80 per occupied to employees of nearby Griffith University, Gold Coast University Hospital and the nearby private hospital and some double-income professional couples
  • Some university students live in the smaller one-bedroom units

The proximity to Griffith University and the Gold Coast University Hospital plus a private hospital was a drawcard for businesses in the medical and advanced manufacturing areas. This Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct is now the commercial driver.

There are now 14,000 employees and students in the area and the Gold Coast light rail runs to the top of the hill.

The 2018 Commonwealth Games athletes’ recreation rooms are now home to small start-up businesses in a centre called Cohort.

On Cohort’s top floor, a bar during the Games has become an artificial intelligence laboratory.

A master plan has existed since 2008, showing where high and medium-density residential, open space and mixed-use spaces could be established.

The private sector has built several unit complexes, but there is plenty of space. About 50 hectares is still owned by the Queensland government.

The 2018 Southport athletes’ village could be the model for Hamilton, Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct staff said. The challenge was identifying the commercial driver to transform the site after the Olympic Games.

Brisbane Times asked State Development questions about the Hamilton site and its potential use during and after the Olympics.

In response, the department said: “All Games partners continue to work through the options around the proposed Games masterplan to be submitted as part of Brisbane’s candidature.”

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7 hours ago, Victorian said:

What performances would be at the ceremonies? Would they focus on Queensland artists or bring in other Aussie artists too?

i suspect the event will have national artists - sydney 2000 had John Farnham (Lives in melbourne), Human Nature (Sydney), Vanessa Amorossi (Melbourne),  Tina Arena (Melbourne) and Pee Wee Ferris (Sydney) amongst others

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On 3/8/2021 at 4:17 PM, Victorian said:

I know it is early BUT

Sally Pearson surely is the one to light the cauldron

What performances would be at the ceremonies? Would they focus on Queensland artists or bring in other Aussie artists too?

I was at the Commonwealth Games 2018 ceremony and was shocked there was no Waltzing Matilda or those famous australian songs. Maybe there is an aussie song medley? I thought the national anthem was done well though.

Sally would be an excellent choice.

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Can the 2023 FIFA Women's World Cup leave a legacy for the potential Brisbane 2032 Olympics?

Credit: ABC News Australia

By Daniela Intili

9 March, 2021

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup in France was watched by a record 1.12 billion viewers, and that figure could double by 2023 when Australia and New Zealand co-host what will be the biggest Women's World Cup.

The tournament will debut an expanded format of 32 teams, up from 24, making it arguably the biggest sporting event held in Australia since the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

"When FIFA rolls into town, they don't do things by half," said Football Australia's Head of Women's Football, Sarah Walsh.

"We'll see the benefits of that long after the actual tournament is delivered beyond 2023."

With Brisbane in the box seat to host the 2032 Olympic games, Walsh believes some of the strategies outlined in FFA's Legacy 23 plan could provide a blueprint for the 2032 Summer games. 

The extensive document outlined five key factors that focuses on increasing female participation, greater female representation in leadership roles, improved football facilities, maximising tourism and international trade, and a high-performance program for the Matildas.

"I think we have something here that can be adopted by the Queensland and federal governments to start thinking about what they'll need for the 2032 Olympics," said Walsh, who represented Australia at an Olympics and a World Cup.

Moya Dodd played in the first-ever FIFA women's world tournament in 1988, which led to the first FIFA Women's World Cup taking place in China in 1991.

"I think Australia's sporting reputation as a host feeds off every successful tournament that we are able to implement, and I know that every one of these bids will list all the other tournaments Australia has successfully pulled off, right back to Sydney 2000," Dodd said.

"So I'm sure [the 2023 Women's World Cup] will add to the case for Australia to host in 2032."

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Brisbane bid for 2032 Olympics closer with IOC meeting

9:10pm Mar 10, 2021

Japan’s battle with COVID-19 to help Brisbane’s bid for 2032 Olympics

The potential for Brisbane to host the 2032 Olympic Games is strengthening with the International Olympic Committee meeting tonight to further discussions.

All 103 members of the committee will convene via Zoom, to hear why the Queensland capital should be the preferred host city.

Nine News can exclusively reveal Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner have recorded a joint message for committee members, publicly backing the bid.

Part of Nine's 'The Sporting Bubble' - a documentary about how the 2020 AFL season was saved - will be played to the IOC, highlighting Queensland's ability to keep high-level sport going during the coronavirus pandemic.

A special task force has been created to finalise the venue master plan and key decisions include checking the viability of the $2 billion Brisbane Arena at Roma Street.

They will also decide whether to renovate the Gabba or build a new stadium at Albion Park Raceway which will mean construction of a major transport line, likely a train network.

 

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Queensland MPs launch Olympic and Paralympic Group as Brisbane prepares to be awarded 2032 Games

Credit: Inside the Games

By Duncan Mackay

Wednesday, 10 March 2021

A Parliamentary Friendship Group celebrating the important role Olympic and Paralympic sports play in the Queensland community has launched, with an opening function at Parliament House in Brisbane, the city set to be awarded the 2032 Games.

 

The Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic and Paralympic Movements is a bi-partisan group open to all Members of Parliament (MP) and will promote the values of Olympism and Paralympism in Queensland.

The Group is to be co-chaired by Joe Kelly, a Labor MP for the Brisbane suburb of Greenslopes and Tim Mander, the Liberal National Party Member for Everton, another area in the city.

More than 40 MPs were joined by Matt Carroll and Lynne Anderson, the chief executives of the Australian Olympic Committee and Australian Paralympic Committee, respectively.

They were joined by several Olympians, Paralympians, sports administrators and business and government representatives.

The Group's objectives include promoting, raising awareness of and encourage participation in sport for benefits of health, longevity, fitness, skill, achievement, social interaction, wellbeing and other benefits of exercise for all individuals in Queensland.

It also aims to recognise the heritage, culture and contribution of the country’s first people, and to give practical support to the issue of Indigenous reconciliation through sport.

The establishment of the Group follows last month’s announcement that the International Olympic Committee had entered opened “targeted dialogue” with the Australian Olympic Committee to award the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games to Brisbane.

"Thank you to all the Queensland members for supporting this wonderful initiative and for your embrace of the immense benefits that Olympic and Paralympic sport can bring to your communities," Carroll said.

"From improving health and wellbeing in communities through sport across the state to inspiring our next generation of Olympians and Paralympians. Olympic and Paralympic sport is a unifying force for good.

"Queensland has shown it’s incredible enthusiasm for the Olympic and Paralympic ideals; since launching in Queensland in 2018, Olympics Unleashed, presented by Optus, has taken Olympians and athletes aspiring for Tokyo into more than 600 schools from Cape York to Coolangatta, inspiring more than 94 000 Queensland students to be the best they can be.

"Right now, hundreds of Queensland athletes are training and competing to realise their Olympic or Paralympic dream in Tokyo - and in less than 140 days those athletes will help inspire, thrill and unite millions of Australians cheering them on back home.

"With the exciting prospect of a potential home Games in 2032, we look forward to continuing to work with the members of the PFG to promote and maximise the benefits Olympic and Paralympic sport can deliver to the people of Queensland."

Anderson claimed the value of the newly launched group will extend far beyond Olympic and Paralympic sport.

“The Olympic and Paralympic Movements our unique," she said.  

"We seek, through sport, to improve health, equality and social inclusion for people,” she said.

“Central to this objective for Paralympics Australia is changing the narrative around disability and highlighting the benefits and opportunities that come from diversity and inclusion. 

"Our athletes have shown us that real change comes from what can be done, rather than what can’t be done.

"We’re keenly focused on taking practical steps to ensure that all Australians, particularly those with a disability, can find the opportunity to engage in sport to the level of their choice, free from barriers that have previously been in the way.

“A potential 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Queensland presents a tremendous opportunity to champion societal change for all Australians with a disability. 

"This is a ‘once in a generation’ chance to potentially bridge the gap when it comes to creating access to increased health, education, employment, transport and accessibility and the related social inclusion benefits."

Co-chairs Kelly and Mander were excited to launch the bi-partisan group.

“The Olympic and Paralympic Movements inspire young people to try, to get involved in sport and to strive to keep improving," Kelly said.

"There will be young kids watching our athletes in Tokyo and thinking ‘I want to do that in Brisbane in 2032’.

"There’s many lessons for everybody in society from the Olympic and Paralympic Movements, including members of Parliament. Lessons of trying to do your best, trying to rise above the day to day to see the bigger picture."

Mander, a former leading Australian rugby league referee, hopes hosting the Olympics in 2032 will help the development of Queensland.

"This is a once in a generation opportunity for Queensland as a whole," he said.

"As a sports lover I’m excited about it but also using this as a catalyst for infrastructure development.

"In these tough times in recent years, Olympians and Paralympians have shown they can lift the morale of the country."

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Japan’s battle with COVID-19 to help Brisbane’s bid for 2032 Olympics

Credit: Brisbane Times

March 10, 2021 — 7.26pm

There are fears COVID-19 will prevent international spectators from attending the Tokyo Olympics but it serves Brisbane's pitch for 2032, reinforcing Queensland's position as a safe option to host the Olympics.

Video

 

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Reduce, re-use, recycle: how the new relaxed Olympic rules make Brisbane’s 2032 bid affordable

Credit: The Conversation

Judith Mair, The University of Queensland

March 9, 2021 6.05am AEDT

Brisbane is in pole position to win the rights to stage the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032, after being named as the preferred candidate city last month. The excitement is building, but the hard economic realities of staging a mega-event can’t be ignored. 

Previous Olympic and Paralympic Games have mixed legacies. There have been stories of venues lying abandoned and host cities left with crippling debts that have taken years to pay off. So will things be different for Brisbane?

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) is well aware of the risks for host cities. In 2018, it introduced the “New Norm” for candidate cities bidding to host the Olympics from 2024 onwards, with 118 reforms to “re-imagine” how they deliver the event.

The key takeaway is the need to cut costs and risks for host cities by introducing more flexibility and efficiency. The aim of the New Norm is to produce a more sustainable legacy for host cities. But how will it work in practice?

Reduce, re-use and recycle

An example of how the New Norm will reduce costs is the relaxation of the IOC demand that each sport/sporting federation needs its own venue. From now on, venues can be used for multiple sports. This means less new infrastructure is needed. 

Another example is the idea that athletes will be able to fly in, compete in their events, then fly home. In previous Games, athletes were accommodated for the full duration of the Games. 

This means we will be able to construct a smaller athletes’ village with multiple occupancies over the Games period. The village will become commercial/retail premises following the Olympics.

The IOC will now allow the use of temporary venues for the Olympics. Previously, everything was purpose-built. Now we will be able to construct venues that can be dismantled after the event, or temporarily adapt existing venues. This will keep the costs of building new venues to a minimum.

The economic implications

The New Norm means the costs of staging Olympic and Paralympic Games have been substantially reduced. But there is still big cash involved. 

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) president John Coates has said the operational budget for the 2032 Games will be A$4.5 billion.

Coates is also optimistic the Games will be delivered as near to cost-neutral as possible. He said:

[O]n a budget of A$4.5 billion, the IOC is putting in $2.5 billion […] then you get approximately $1 billion from national sponsorship and $1 billion from the ticketing.

That’s enough then to pay for both the Olympics and Paralympic Games without any call on the state, or federal or local governments.

But it is not strictly accurate to say the Games will end up costing Brisbane nothing. “Operating costs” for the Olympic and Paralympic Games basically means the cost of putting on the event. Nothing more, nothing less.

To be ready for the event, both the state and federal governments will need to invest significant sums in building venues and the athletes’ village and upgrading roads and public transport. These are capital costs, which will be taxpayer money along with private investment. 

The tourism sweetener

So what might be the lasting benefits of hosting the Olympics that make it a cost worth bearing?

Based on studies of previous Olympics, three significant positive outcomes are worth highlighting.

Firstly, Brisbane and Queensland will be in the global limelight – we couldn’t afford to pay for that kind of publicity. This global attention is likely to result in increased tourism, trade and investment.

In London, more than 800,000 international visitors attended a 2012 Olympic event, delivering a boost of almost £600 million “excluding ticket sales”.

While tourism is almost certain to increase in the short term following the event, evidence for long-term increases in tourism after hosting a mega-event is mixed. 

Secondly, there are many intangible benefits to the residents of host cities, including increased civic pride and social cohesion as well as community health and well-being benefits. 

Thirdly, it can be argued that hosting a mega-event like this can be the catalyst to bring forward many improvements in public transport, roads and services that might otherwise have taken decades to deliver.

Not everyone stands to benefit

Although there should be an ongoing positive legacy from new roads and sporting infrastructure, there will be opportunity costs – maybe a school extension that gets delayed, or a new hospital that gets postponed. 

Also, it is very likely any positive social impacts will not be dispersed equally. Those living in rural and regional Queensland and in already disadvantaged or marginalised communities might not see how the Games help them at all.

The IOC’s New Norm has allowed Brisbane to bid to host the Olympics at a much lower cost than previous host cities have had to bear. But we need to make sure that hosting the Games maximises the potential benefits and minimises the impacts of the negatives.

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BRISBANE OLYMPICS 2032: THE FIRST CLIMATE POSITIVE OLYMPICS

Credit: Climate Council

09.03.21

You might have heard that Brisbane is, in all likelihood, set to host the Olympic Games in 2032. And while this is a big win for Brisbane it could also be a big win for the planet, since the 2032 Games will be the first climate positive summer Olympics.

Sporting events in Australia, and across the planet, are under threat from climate change. Summer sports, already hazardous with high temperatures and potentially noxious conditions such as the smoke haze created by the Black Summer fires, stand to suffer further with heatwaves in Melbourne and Sydney likely to reach 50˚C by the year 2040, making outdoor sport untenable.

The sporting industry isn’t just a witness of climate change but a contributor, too, with estimates placing sports’ global emissions on par with those of Spain. And while sport is a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions, its star power and command of global attention also make it a promising advocate for solutions.

The promise of a climate positive Olympics—and all those following 2030—is a step in the right direction, but only if it’s followed up with successive steps to make tangible and realised change. So what does being climate positive mean? How does it happen? And who’s responsible?

What is a climate positive Olympics?

A ‘climate positive’ Olympics describes an Olympics that doesn’t settle for reducing its emissions to zero and offsetting those emissions it can’t avoid (carbon neutral), but goes further to absorb or remove more than it produces to become ‘carbon negative’—a synonym for climate positive.

“This way, the Olympic Games will become climate positive, meaning that the carbon savings they create will exceed the potential negative impacts of their operations,” the International Olympic Committee says.

It’s not difficult to imagine the emissions toll from a traditional Olympic games: the international travel of countless far-flung athletes, the transport of masses of specialised equipment, and the construction of brand-new infrastructure (transport systems, Olympic villages, stadia, and Olympic parks) whose carbon footprint can be gauged by recalling that cement, for instance, is the source of about 8% of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. So, how does one host a climate positive Olympics?

How to host a climate positive Olympics

While the details of a climate positive Brisbane 2032 Olympics are yet to be laid out, the International Olympic Committee and other interim host nations—Japan (2021), France (2024), the United States (2028)—provide an outline for how emissions might be reduced.

Infrastructure

One simple change will see Brisbane 2032 using pre-existing buildings to house athletes and host sports wherever possible:

  • Athletes and team officials will be accommodated in pre-existing hotels across South East Queensland, including the Gold Coast
  • Athletics and basketball competitions are planned to take place in the Albion Precinct
  • Archery will be in the South Bank Cultural Forecourt
  • Equestrian and BMX will be at Victoria Park
  • Table tennis and fencing will take place in the Exhibition Centre
  • Even the Gabba has been earmarked as a potential host for the opening and closing ceremonies.

Sporting complexes could also implement solar systems and batteries to operate on 100% renewable electricity. One such renewable facility is Queensland’s Metricon Stadium, host to the 2018 Commonwealth Games, that possesses a ‘solar rim’—a five metre-wide ring of solar panels around the entire inner roofline—that supplies roughly 20 percent of the stadium’s total electricity needs.

Though a bespoke ‘Olympic village’, and potential stadium, is planned, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has stated that, where possible, the venues used by the games will be pre-existing.

Transport and travel

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has identified transport as one of sport’s largest sources of emissions. In order to curb these emissions, the IOC recommends:

  • Meet virtually, wherever possible
  • Use public, not personal, transport
  • Share vehicles to reduce total number of journeys
  • Use fuel-efficient and low/zero-emissions vehicles

While many of these solutions are aimed at the emissions associated with sportspeople, those derived from fans and spectators—driving to a large-scale sporting event, for instance—can be reduced by encouraging the use of public transport, cycling, or walking such as the ‘Fan Trail’ used in the 2011 Rugby World Cup in Auckland that featured entertainment and food and drink en route.

Infrastructure and transport aren’t the only way to counter a games’ carbon footprint. Brisbane 2032 might also co opt some of the emissions reduction practices of the upcoming Tokyo, Beijing (Winter Olympics), and Paris games, such as those outlined below.

Influence from the International Olympic Committee and upcoming Olympic Games

If thrift is the spirit of Brisbane 2032, we might give recognition to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) who, in 2014, adopted sustainability as a primary pillar. In recent years the IOC has, with increasing breadth and boldness, made moves to reduce its carbon footprint and address ‘the growing climate crisis’, promising to collaborate with each Olympic Host City to achieve a climate positive games.

“Climate change is a challenge of unprecedented proportions, and it requires an unprecedented response,” said IOC President Thomas Bach. “Looking ahead, we want to do more than reducing and compensating our own impact. We want to ensure that, in sport, we are at the forefront of the global efforts to address climate change and leave a tangible, positive legacy for the planet.”

The IOC headquarters in Switzerland leads by example on sustainability, hosting a fleet of renewable hydrogen-fuelled vehicles and a renewable hydrogen production and refuelling station.

Upcoming Olympics promise to reduce their emissions to zero too:

  • Tokyo 2021 is aiming for carbon neutrality
  • Olympic Partner Toyota will provide zero-emissions vehicles, including cars powered by renewable hydrogen, for the Tokyo Olympic fleet
  • For Beijing 2022, all venues will be powered by renewable energy
  • Paris 2024 is on track to becoming carbon-neutral
  • For LA 2028, all venues already exist

The commitments of the IOC and its Host Cities are valiant and, for the attention they garner for climate action, invaluable. That makes the Brisbane Olympics 2032 so important. The world’s attention will be turned to the land down under, to Queensland—where the sun does shine—when Brisbane will need to set the bar to new heights and show the world how a climate positive summer games is done.

To learn how Australian sport can already cut back on carbon emissions, read our sports report, Game, Set, Match: Calling Time on Climate Inaction.

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Olympics: Brisbane 2032 Games bid gets backing from Australian PM

Credit: Channel News Asia

12 Mar 2021 12:01AM

Brisbane's bid to host the 2032 summer Olympics got the backing of Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday, who told the International Olympic Committee all levels of government were firmly behind the candidacy.

 

REUTERS: Brisbane's bid to host the 2032 summer Olympics got the backing of Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison on Thursday, who told the International Olympic Committee all levels of government were firmly behind the candidacy.

Brisbane was named as the preferred choice for the 2032 Games late last month, beating several other cities and countries who had publicly expressed an interest, and will now enter into a detailed dialogue with the IOC before any final decision is taken.

"Every level of government is working together to deliver Brisbane 2032," Morrison told the IOC session via a short video message. "We will leave nothing to chance as we work with you during this period of dialogue."

"We want to be a trusted partner, a certain partner in uncertain times," Morrison said, adding his country could deliver another successful Games after Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000.

"It would be a greater honour for Australia to once again host your Games."

The IOC praised Brisbane's candidacy, saying it provided stability to the Olympic movement amid turbulent times.

The Tokyo 2020 Olympics last year became the first Games to be postponed outside world-war periods, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"Brisbane presented an excellent opportunity to secure the future of the Olympic movement at times of uncertainty," Kristin Kloster Aasen, who heads the IOC's future host commission, told the session.

She cited the positive technical assessment of Brisbane's plans, a favourable economic outlook for the region and the country as well as strong political, private sector and public support.

"Moving to a targeted dialogue means we are moving the project to a second stage," Kloster Aasen said. "It does not however mean we are electing an Olympic host now."

Other countries and cities interested in the 2032 Games included, Indonesia, the Hungarian capital Budapest, China, Doha and Germany’s Ruhr valley.

(Reporting by Karolos Grohmann; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: Reuters

 

 

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EXCLUSIVE: New $135m facility could bring Olympics to Lockyer

Credit: The Courier Mail

By Ali Kuchel

March 11, 2021 - 4:53PM
 
Plans for a new $135 million equine facility in Gatton have been revealed putting it in the hot seat to potentially host 2032 Olympic events. DETAILS:
Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.
Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club

Plans to build a $135 million, multi-stage world-class equine facility at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club has the potential to boost provincial racing, the local equine industry as well as bring the Olympics to town.

Currently in the business case stage, News Corp can exclusively reveal the plans to build the Lockyer Equine Precinct on the grounds of the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.

It is understood the facility would be rolled out in several stages, with a $32m racetrack upgrade structured around facilities at the Sunshine Coast earmarked for Stage 1. 

The multi-use racing and equine precinct is aimed at enhancing the growth of thoroughbred racing, equine industries and related businesses in the Lockyer.

Brisbane’s bid for the 2032 Olympics would be a regional push, delivering a number of sports into regional communities - such as the Lockyer Valley.

But with Brisbane’s bid for the 2032 Olympics, the equine precinct would become a “legacy” project and an option to host international events including dressage, showjumping and eventing.

Lockyer Valley Turf Club president Terry Kirkwood.
Lockyer Valley Turf Club president Terry Kirkwood

With an increasing number of trainers racing their horses at Gatton, Lockyer Valley Turf Club president Terry Kirkwood said the club and its “unique” land was ideal for expansion. 

“We’re not going to be an Eagle Farm or Doomben. We will always have that country feel and vibe because we’ve got the creek around us,” Mr Kirkwood said.

The Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct has been in the pipelines for a couple of years, and the formation of the Lockyer Valley Equine Collaborative has brought the project to fruition.


It involves maintaining the racing facilities, while converting “dead space” in the middle of the track to a horse sports precinct, capable of holding dressage, showjumping, polocrosse and stockhorse events.

The Lockyer Valley Regional Council have contributed about $35,000 to developing the project and deputy mayor Jason Cook said a number of equine organisations had identified the need for the facility.

“If the business case stacks up, we will have a venue that can be considered for the Olympics,” he said.

“The Olympic body has stated the new model of the Olympics is regional, not city centric.

“They are about having legacy facilities. This is regional, this is a legacy facility. The legacy here is it’s needed, not just something we are building for the Olympics.

“If we fail with the Olympics, it’s still a needed facility.”

Lockyer Valley Regional Council deputy mayor Jason Cook with concept designs of the new Lockyer Valley Equine precinct: PHOTO: Ali Kuchel

Lockyer Valley Regional Council deputy mayor Jason Cook with concept designs of the new Lockyer Valley Equine precinct: PHOTO: Ali Kuchel

The Turf Club, Lockyer Valley Regional Council, Racing Queensland, Equestrian Queensland and the University of Queensland and the Regional Development Australia Ipswich and West Moreton have come on board for the project.

Each collaborative organisation has contributed to developing the project masterplan. 

Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.

Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.

It’s expected the business case study will be completed by the end of June, but it is unknown when construction would begin – if it gets the green light.

Mr Kirkwood, who has been president of the turf club for five years, said trainers were wanting to bring and train their horses in Gatton.

“We don’t have to go to Brisbane, it’s in our own back yard. We’ve got a unique piece of land,” Mr Kirkwood said.

The big picture

Stage One

  • Realigning the course proper track, making it 25m wide
  • Adding a second grass track for unofficial and official trials
  • 10m all-weather poly surfaced training track
  • First block of 60 on-ground stabling
  • Underground eastern tunnel to access the centre of the track
  • Jockey, stewards, change room facilities

Future Stages

  • Horse walker
  • Horse swimming pool
  • ‘Beehive’ functions/operations centre
  • Community Parkland
  • 120 race day stables
  • Centre arenas
Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.

Concept designs for the Lockyer Valley Equine Precinct, which will be built at the Lockyer Valley Turf Club.

Cr Cook said the council’s contribution to the project would be the land, and that the upgrade would rely on the collaborative and the state and federal government contributions.

He said it’s one of the largest projects the Lockyer Valley has seen for several years.

“It will be heavily reliant on the government saying yes,” he said.

“Initially this was mainly racing, then equestrian Queensland came in and said they were chasing some facilities, then the possibility of the Olympics, it’s got us to the point where we are now.”

To view the full plan, click here.

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Where will sailing be held at a SE Queensland Olympics?

Credit: My Sailing

8 March 2021

 

Last week, the authoritative Olympic website Inside the Games reported that Brisbane had taken “a huge step” towards securing the hosting rights for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) confirmed the Australian region as its preferred candidate.

There has been considerable media discussion about possible venues for the various sports, but as yet no firm decisions have been made about sailing venues – assuming that sailing remains an Olympic sport in 11 years time.

An Australian Olympic Committee spokesperson said that “a number of sailing venues” have been identified in the Venue Masterplan.

“Work will continue during the Targeted Dialogue phase in refining all venue options. There is no timeline on these discussions, which are ongoing,"the person told Mysailing.

What we do know is that the Whitsundays is being heavily considered for the two-person double-handed offshore keelboat race – if that event survives a vote at World Sailing later in the year. World Sailing voted to include it for Paris 2024 in place of the Finn class, but a change of President and well-targeted lobbying by the Finn class mean the decision is being re-visited.

Even if the event survives the re-vote, and takes place at Paris as currently planned, there is no guarantee that it will still be an Olympic event in 2032. If there are logistical problems with security, massive costs, or if the race, that could last 12 times as long as the marathon and goes through the night, simply bores the pants off the TV audience, it will go the way of the Women’s Match Racing, which appeared only at London 2012 before being canned for Rio 2016.

If the event takes place, and it’s obviously a big “if”, the Whitsundays would be an ideal venue with all those islands and a good chance of trade winds and fine weather. It would probably be raced out of Hamilton Island, where CEO Glenn Bourke would provide plenty of experience at running major events, having been CEO of the Volvo Ocean Race and competition manager for sailing at Sydney 2000, among many other claims to fame.

There have also been unconfirmed rumours that kitesurfing would be held on the Sunshine Coast if SEQ gets the 2032 Games. Again, this makes sense from a TV point of view.

But the big question is, where will the traditional sailing events be held – the Laser, 49er and multihull classes?

Sailing has often suffered for its need to have a venue that provides a big rigging area and a fair contest out on the water. More often than not, that means the sailing venue is in a different city to the major Games events such as track and field, swimming and cycling.

At London 2012, for example, the venue at Portland/Weymouth was excellent from a sailing point of view, but was 137km from the athletes village in London. This meant that the sailors missed out on rubbing shoulders with sporting superstars like Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps, with several of them saying the Olympics was “just a big Worlds”.

Even at Rio 2016, where the sailing was held in the city of Rio, it was still over an hour on the bus to the main stadium. And Enoshima, the sailing venue for Tokyo 2021, is over 60km from the main village.

One of the logical venues for sailing at SEQ 2032 is Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron at Manly, a coastal suburb of Brisbane. RQ has a huge rigging area and has run major events like Sail Brisbane and class world championships.

Manly is only 30km, or about half an hour by road, from the centre of Brisbane, meaning sailors would be able to stay in the main athletes village, making them feel part of the greater Games. Swimming, cycling and possibly canoeing would all be taking place within 10km of the sailing venue.

The downside is that Moreton Bay, while a nice enough place to sail, is not exactly “iconic Australia”. Protected from the ocean by North Stradbroke Island, the water colour is rarely a sparkling blue and the view from the water is primarily suburban Brisbane on one side and tree-covered island on the other. The wind, too, can be a bit fickle, making setting courses a challenge on light days.

The other venue that has been suggested is the Gold Coast. According to the IOC Feasibility Assessment document, there would be two athletes villages if SEQ gets the Games. The main one, a new development will be in Brisbane, while existing hotels would be used to host athletes based on the Gold Coast.

From a television perspective, the Gold Coast, with its iconic beaches and highrise towers, would certainly provide a spectacular backdrop for sailing events. Assuming that the rigging area would be on the Broadwater and sailing would take place on the open ocean, steady winds would be likely.

But, in my opinion, there is only one opinion that counts when deciding where to sail – that of the sailors. I would suggest that Australian Sailing asks current and past Olympic sailors and coaches which venue they would prefer – and then strongly recommends that venue to the AOC. They should do this soon, so that planning can commence immediately.

I know that this is a novel concept for Australian Sailing – asking the people most affected by a decision for their opinion before that decision is etched into stone – but I think it’s worth trying, just this once…

Sailors, check out the various options by clicking on the pictures above, and please make your opinions known by commenting below.

Roger McMillan - Editor

 

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IOC pushes back on idea of 2032 and 2036 double awarding of Summer Olympic Games

Credit:  Gamesbids.com

Posted on Mar 11, 2021 2:06 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) Thursday rejected any chance that the 2032 and 2036 Summer Games could be awarded at the same time.

IOC Future Host Commission chair Kristin Kloster Aasen presents at 137th IOC Session March 11, 2021 (IOC Photo)

IOC Future Host Commission chair Kristin Kloster Aasen (on screen) presents at 137th IOC Session March 11, 2021 (IOC Photo)

During a presentation of the Brisbane 2032 Olympic bid that was elevated to the ‘targeted dialogue’ stage last month, Future Host Commission chair Kristin Kloster Aasen addressed the question that had apparently been shared among IOC members ahead of the virtual online Session taking place this week.

In 2017 both Paris and Los Angeles were awarded the 2024 and 2028 Games respectively after the two cities were the only remaining candidates in the hunt for the earlier edition.

But Kloster Aasen told members “The 2024, 2028 double award was a very different situation for many reasons.

“Not least was that it was an election 11 years ahead while 2036 would represent 15 years before the Games.

“In addition the Olympic Games will evolve tremendously during this period.  The Games are a reflection of society and there is going to be an evolution of national and international priorities on sustainability, human development and many other topics.”

Brisbane was singled out as the preferred candidate in February meaning that it will likely become the third Australian Olympic Games host city once completing a questionnaire, providing financial and venue guarantees and agreeing to contract terms.  If completed this year Brisbane could be elected with the most lead time ever for a Games.

IOC members generally supported the Commission’s decisions when providing feedback in the Session.

Senior Canadian IOC member Dick Pound said “I strongly support the position of the Commission to consider only a single Summer Games host at this time.

“In the circumstances I think to go beyond Games in 2032 would be unwise, and I must say even 11 years is a long time in a world that is changing as quickly as it does today.

“On the other hand I think perhaps the resilience and certainty that can be derived from choosing a host for 2032, especially in a post COVID world could send the reassuring message to the world.”

Pound added that choosing a 2036 host city now would unduly “tie the hands” of a future president and membership.

Other members including Prince Albert of Monaco were aligned with Pound’s reasoning.

Rival cities were blindsided by the IOC’s surprise decision last month that followed new bidding guidelines permitting Host City Commissions to choose a candidate at any time without interim reporting.

Bids from Germany, Qatar and North and South Korea were disappointed and claimed they will continue to campaign for 2032 in the event IOC negotiations with Australia fall through.  These cities would likely be interested in a quick 2036 award – but Kloster Aasen ruled out the possibility.

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Olympics 2032: Brisbane takes another big step towards securing Games

Credit:  The Courier Mail

By Julian Linden

March 12, 2021 - 3:41PM

Brisbane’s bid for the 2032 Olympics has taken another step in the right direction, after getting the thumbs up from a crucial ally.
 

Brisbane is another big step closer to being officially named as the host of the 2032 Olympics and Paralympics after getting the thumbs up from the full International Olympic Committee (IOC) membership.

The IOC executive board already announced last month that it had agreed to enter into ‘targeted dialogue” with Southeast Queensland after it was identified as the preferred candidate for the 2032 Games.

But now that decision has been supported by the full IOC membership after re-elected IOC President Thomas Bach gave his endorsement to the new procedures for selecting host cities.

“The new approach is focused on keeping costs to a minimum and it prevents undue influence and lobbying,” Bach said. 

“Our revolution had immediate positive results.”

With Paris (2024) and Los Angeles (2028) already locked in for the next two Summer Olympics after this year’s rescheduled Tokyo Games, one of the keys to fast-tracking Brisbane as the preferred candidate for 2032 has been the unwavering support of the government.

All three levels of government are backing the bid, with Prime Minister Scott Morrison personally appearing in a video presentation that was aired to the full IOC Session during this week’s virtual meeting.

“We will leave nothing to chance as we work with you during this period of dialogue,” the Prime Minister said.

“We want to be a trusted partner, a thorough and reliable partner of the International Olympic Committee.

“We’ll be a certain partner in uncertain times. We take nothing for granted and look forward to working with you. We know there is still much more ahead and the ultimate decision is yours.”

Queensland state premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner also appeared on the video, along with Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President John Coates, who was one of the architects of the new Future Host Commission.

The commission was established after an alarming drop off in the number of candidates for the 2024 Summer Games and the 2022 Winter Games, awarded to Beijing.

Coates’ role in helping to develop the framework for selecting future hosts has led to some grumblings from other candidates for 2032 but the commission chair, Norway’s Kristin Kloster Aasen, told the Session the new system was completely transparent.

“IOC Executive Board Members and representatives of countries who have expressed an interest in hosting the Games are not allowed to serve on the Future Host Commissions,” she said.

“The Commissions represent all stakeholder groups – the International Federations, the National Olympic Committees, athletes and the International Paralympic Committee. And there are strict rules in regard to confidentiality, conflict of interest and abiding by the IOC‘s Code of Ethics.

Exactly when Brisbane is officially named as 2032 host remains unknown but it could be as early as July 20 or 21, when the IOC Session next meets, just days before the opening ceremony for the Tokyo Olympics.

It is up to the IOC executive board to decide when to proceed with the formal election of the 2032 host. The executive board will meet in Tokyo on July 17 and 18.

In the meantime, Brisbane 2032 and the AOC have been asked to submit their responses before the Future Host Commission reports back to the executive board.

Only once Brisbane meets all the requirements can the vote proceed but the IOC will also continue talks with other candidates in case they are not met.

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'Great honour': Scott Morrison makes massive Olympics statement

Credit: Yahoo Sport

By Riley Morgan

12 March 2021, 3:14 pM

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison has promised the International Olympic Committee (IOC) potential host city Brisbane would be the ideal location for the Games during uncertain times.

Brisbane was named as the IOC's preferred choice for the 2032 Games late last month, beating several other cities and countries who had publicly expressed an interest, and will now enter into a detailed dialogue with Olympic chiefs before any final decision is taken.

Speaking to the IOC, Morrison promised Brisbane, and Australia, would be a "certain partner in uncertain times".

In a promising step, the IOC said Brisbane bid could help "secure the future of the Olympic movement".

"Every level of government is working together to deliver Brisbane 2032," Morrison told the virtual IOC session via a short video message.

"We will leave nothing to chance as we work with you during this period of dialogue.

"We want to be a trusted partner, a certain partner in uncertain times."

Brisbane favoured for 2032 Olympic Games

Brisbane got the leg up after being announced as the preferred choice for the 2032 Olympics, by the committee, but other countries are putting forward cities to host the games.

The IOC will enter dialogue before choosing the city and nation to host the Games.

Morrison added that Australia country could deliver another successful Games after Melbourne 1956 and Sydney 2000.

"It would be a greater honour for Australia to once again host your Games," Morrison added.

In a promising move, the IOC defended its choice of getting behind Brisbane's candidacy, which has effectively ended the hopes of other bidders.

"Brisbane presented an excellent opportunity to secure the future of the Olympic movement at times of uncertainty," Kristin Kloster Aasen, who heads the IOC's future host commission, told the session. 

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Brisbane 2032 Olympic Games Progression Extremely Positive for New Zealand

Credit: Olympic.org.nz

New Zealand’s athletes, sports fans and youth are just some of the parties set to benefit if Brisbane’s bid for the 2032 Olympic Games is successful.

The IOC (International Olympic Committee) this week entered a targeted dialogue with the Brisbane candidature to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, confirming the city as the preferred host.

NZOC CEO Kereyn Smith welcomed the news and says an Australian Olympic Games would provide a huge boost for Olympic sport in New Zealand.

“This is really significant for New Zealand and our athletes,” said Smith.

“A Brisbane Olympic Games would see athletes from all over the world preparing to compete and train in the Southern Hemisphere in the years ahead of the Games. This presents a huge opportunity for New Zealand to join Australia in hosting athletes, qualification tournaments and pre-Games training camps in the build-up to 2032.

“The New Zealand Team performed exceptionally well at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and we would love the opportunity to again compete in this part of the world.”

And athletes wouldn’t be the only group to benefit, with a 2032 Games in Brisbane also presenting opportunities for other New Zealanders to be involved in the Olympic Games.

“We have amazing sporting officials in New Zealand so it provides the chance for them to help bring the Games to life and be involved in an Olympic Games close to home,” said Smith.

“And of-course we can’t forget our sports fans who would be able to jump on a quick flight and enjoy amazing Olympic competition and all the atmosphere that comes with being a part of the world’s largest sporting event.”

The IOC is now advancing a targeted dialogue with the Brisbane 2032 Committee and will report back to its Executive Board. If all the requirements are met, the Board will then propose the election of the future host of the Games of XXXV Olympiad to an upcoming IOC Session.

Smith says if the Games are awarded to Brisbane it would provide Olympic sport in New Zealand with both momentum and a milestone.

“We would be able to start looking towards these Games, planning investment and targeting our approach in order to maximise our opportunities.”

“As well it would be amazing for our youth. Young boys and girls would be able to say ‘I want to compete at the Olympic Games in Australia in 11-years-time’ which is pretty special.”

Australia has hosted two previous editions of the Olympic Games; Sydney 2000 and Melbourne 1956. If successful, Brisbane 2032 would follow the Paris 2024 and LA 2028 Olympic Games. 

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OpEd: Brisbane 2032 Signals an Olympic Shift

Credit:  Around The Rings

03/12/21

The selection of a new Olympic host city generates worldwide interest and speculation. Michael Pirrie, a founding member of London’s bid of the 2012 Games, looks at the elusive critical success factors behind Brisbane’s preferred nomination for the 2032 Olympics. 
 

The art of calling an Olympic Games host city contest can be cloaked in mystery and fraught with uncertainty - like picking the winning lottery ticket numbers or first wisps of white smoke signaling a new Pope. 

Vast amounts of time, energy and resources have been invested by many aspiring Olympic cities and nations to assemble a successful Olympic bid or candidacy.

The pending announcement of a new Olympic host city attracts world attention and renewed speculation on the winning formula and factors.

Most campaigning cities invariably believe they have the successful combination. While many factors can play a role, only a few really matter or make a difference. 

Brisbane had the elusive elements that make preferred host city nomination more than a random choice or date with destiny.

While a new host city selection process is now in place, many of the critical success factors underpinning previous successful bids were also highly influential in Brisbane’s nomination.  

I saw those factors up close and in full force working for London on the great race for the 2012 Olympic Games, eventually won by the British capital following a landmark three year global contest involving an unprecedented cavalcade of cities – Paris, New York, Moscow, Madrid and London.

Successful Olympic Games depends on reliability and predictability in timing and planning.
 

http://aroundtherings.com//articles/images/ysssixie.pfw.jpgBrisbane, Australia (Wikimedia Commons)

The key challenge facing the IOC Executive Board for 2032 was choosing the city that offered most stability and security for the global Olympic Games event in the looming decade of uncertainty ahead.

London’s bid centered on how it would advance the Olympic Movement: delivering an electrifying host city experience for athletes; inspiring young people; and regenerating disadvantaged communities.

Brisbane’s capacity to advance and strengthen the Olympic Movement, in the radically different circumstances of COVID, also was fundamental to its nomination.

CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS

Like the London bid, which was expertly counseled by the British Olympic Association chaired by senior IOC member Sir Craig Reedie, Brisbane was guided by the high performing Australian Olympic Committee.

This was critical for Brisbane in order to understand what was important for NOCs, IFs and the wider Olympic Movement in planning for 2032.

Leadership was absolutely critical to the success of both London and Brisbane.  

In London, along with Sir Keith Mills, a world marketing leader with deep belief in sport, we had Seb Coe, the highly decorated and respected world and Olympic running champion with an intuitive understanding of international sport and politics. 

Coe’s reassuring leadership generated compelling credibility and confidence in London.
 

Brisbane had highly respected champion of Olympic sports administrator and senior IOC Games strategist, John Coates, who helped to design the blueprint for the contemporary Games era as architect of the iconic Sydney 2000 Games. 

As executive adviser for the London Olympic Games organizing committee, I saw Coates also play a key role in the universally acclaimed London Olympics through his work on the IOC’s high level planning coordination commission, along with Denis Oswald, Gilbert Felli, Gunilla Lindberg and others.  

Coates’s vast experience and understanding of complex Olympic Games operations, stakeholder priorities and involvement as Australia’s senior IOC member generated Coe-like confidence for Brisbane.  

NEW GAMES FOCUS

Brisbane also had Olympic Games technical expert Craig McLatchey leading the vital 2032 master planning process.

This focused on fitting the Olympic Games to the contours of the city through extensive temporary adaptation of existing venues and infrastructure for Olympic events to minimize costs.

New infrastructure, services and facilities needed to develop the rapidly growing Brisbane and southeast Queensland region preferred for the Games would also be used in the short term to help host the Olympics.

This would result in new jobs, economic growth and community benefits as part of Australia’s wider recovery from the pandemic.

Government and national support are highest level success factors

This support was demonstrated for London through the involvement of British Prime Minister Tony Blair and dynamic Minister for Culture, Media and Sport and Olympic bid, the late Tessa Jowell.
 

http://aroundtherings.com//articles/images/gxf3v15x.3o1.jpgCoates, Thomas Bach, Australian prime minister Scott Morrison & Australian ambassador to Japan Jan Adams meet in Tokyo. (Australian NOC)

Similar support for Brisbane came through constant government contact and discussions with the IOC. This culminated in a strategically and symbolically important meeting between IOC President Thomas Bach and Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who expressed full support for the Brisbane Games.

FUTURE PROOFING THE GAMES: THE BRISBANE BUBBLE

Brisbane is the first city preferred for the COVID era.

After Australia flattened the virus through early border closures, lockdowns, extensive testing, contact tracing and quarantine, Brisbane hopes to fast track its region, economy, profile and future through the Olympic Games as a project of national and international significance while the world slowly recovers.

With Australia’s sophisticated internal defense, intelligence and rapid response emergency services and systems, advanced medical and hospital facilities, communications technology, and mature sports marketing culture, Brisbane also provides a unique opportunity to future-proof the Olympics against sudden new threats.

Australia also rests in geopolitically stable Oceania, distant from most volatile world regions that can endanger major sporting events. These have included the Gulf blockade that threatened to isolate the pre-pandemic Doha 2019 World Athletics championships.
 

http://aroundtherings.com//articles/images/33ek1d1v.fb1.jpgSpectators were welcomed back for the Australian Open. (Australian Open)

Australia’s history as a nation that does what it says was also critical. 

The recent Australian Open tennis Grand Slam was the first major international sporting event of the pandemic with large numbers of spectators; not a single case of infection was detected or linked to the event or wider community.

Speaking at the Grand Slam, tennis superstar, Rafael Nadal said: “The country is doing great with the pandemic. Australia is probably one of the best examples in the world with how they react to these very challenging times.”

The future of the Olympic Movement depends on the future of the Olympic Games, and Brisbane’s nomination marks the next stage in the evolution of the vital host city selection process.

As the 2032 preferred city nomination deadline approached, a consensus of support coalesced amongst EB members that Brisbane could best meet the most pressing needs of the Games in turbulent times – stability, safety, and flexibility. 

Support also formed among key stakeholders and partners, including athletes and NBC, that Brisbane offered the safest environment for Olympic sport and a rich global broadcast and digital experience of the Games. 

NEW CONSOLIDATION ERA 

The message from Brisbane’s nomination is that this is a time for consolidation in the Olympic Movement; a time for prudence, probity and risk minimization in the selection of host cities.

The era of expansion and experimentation that led to Rio and Sochi is over.

The further migration of the Olympic Games up the east coast of Australia to Brisbane is a journey towards that safety and stability. 
 

http://aroundtherings.com//articles/images/i01cwqeb.jxx.jpgSydney 2000 was the last Olympics to be held in Australia. (ATR)

Brisbane follows Olympic Games stop overs in Melbourne and Sydney in a nation with some of the world's best sports venues and support services located in nearby coastal cities.

These will support Olympic training and qualifying for Brisbane and provide enormous redundancy as potential reserve venues if necessary. 

OLYMPIC CIRCUIT BREAKER

The IOC faced a make or break decision as the new year dawned with the next two Olympic cities in Tokyo and Beijing again in the grip of the pandemic.

A climate of fear and uncertainty had engulfed the world and Olympic Movement in the wake of the pandemic and postponement of Tokyo.

Preparations for Games scheduled later in the decade in Paris and Los Angeles also were challenged as COVID continued to threaten France and US and other nations.

This was creating deep uncertainty over future prospects and options for the Games as the IOC sought to determine where the Olympics belonged in a rapidly changing world of growing social, economic and political unrest.

This included international calls for a boycott of next year’s Beijing Games over human rights concerns; also China’s initial notification of COVID cases to the international community as the virus began its global killing spree shutting down sport worldwide. 

Brisbane provides a much needed COVID circuit breaker.

SECOND CITIES  
 

http://aroundtherings.com//articles/images/drgi1vc4.r5j.jpgBrisbane's selection could help Budapest in a future bid. (GAISF)

With so much virus still circulating in the world’s super cities and sports capitals from London and New York to Moscow, Brisbane opens up a new tier of second or midsized cities to follow in the footsteps of Barcelona’s spectacular success as a smaller Olympic city. 

Brisbane’s regional Games model also will help to pave the way for Budapest and Doha and other smaller cities as alternatives to traditional major cities in globally troubled times.

CONCLUSION

Unlike any previous Olympic city selection cycle, the pandemic has emerged as the most important new factor in deciding Games locations.

The Olympic Movement can’t afford another Games postponement. Until the full impact of vaccines and new medications on transmission and new variants can be properly assessed, the capacity of cities and nations to control virus levels will be essential to selecting hosts. 

OLYMPIC OASIS

Brisbane and Australia provide a hub of stability and safety where the Olympic Games can adapt to current and new challenges in the decade ahead.

Australia is a location where the Games can belong and feel at home in a nation with a mythical connection to sport, filling the 115,000 Sydney 2000 Olympic stadium – the biggest in history - night after night and day after day.

Australia has long basked in the glow of its goldfields, wheat farms, surf beaches, amber beer, coastal culture and Olympic gold medals. 

Brisbane’s golden landscapes for sport, after suppressing the virus to near zero daily new cases, offer light and hope in dark pandemic times.

Michael Pirrie led London's global media campaign for the 2012 Olympic Games and was a founding member of the highly regarded bid, and has worked on several Olympic and major event campaigns and committees.

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Suppose Brisbane becomes the host of 2032 Olympics. Which stadium will host Ceremonies/Athletics??

Lang Park is the biggest stadium and its capacity is 52.500 seats.

Also i dont see any major arenas in Brisbane (over 10.000 seats) for sports like Gymnastics, Basketball and Volleyball that Olympics capacity requirements are too high. In commonwealth games these sports where conducted mainly in convention centres with much lower capacity

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1 hour ago, George_D said:

Suppose Brisbane becomes the host of 2032 Olympics. Which stadium will host Ceremonies/Athletics??

Lang Park is the biggest stadium and its capacity is 52.500 seats.

Also i dont see any major arenas in Brisbane (over 10.000 seats) for sports like Gymnastics, Basketball and Volleyball that Olympics capacity requirements are too high. In commonwealth games these sports where conducted mainly in convention centres with much lower capacity

DETAILS REVEALED OF NEW AND EXISTING VENUES THAT WOULD HOST BRISBANE’S 2032 OLYMPICS

Credit: Ausleisure.com.au

1 March 2021

Details revealed of new and existing venues that would host Brisbane’s 2032 Olympics
MARCH 1, 2021
AQUATICS / EVENTS / SPORT / VENUES

With the International Olympic Committee (IOC) having last week declared Brisbane as the ‘preferred candidate city’ to host the 2032 Olympics, venues that would potentially host Games events have revealed in the bid document.

With the bid relying heavily on using existing facilities and sporting infrastructure for the event, it has been promoted as a Games that will break-even, avoiding incurring massive overspends such as those faced by past Olympics.

To achieve its aims, Brisbane’s Olympics would include venues across south-east Queensland, including a number of facilities built for the 2018 Commonwealth Games and possible some built for Sydney’s 2000 Olympics, while football preliminaries would also be played in Sydney and Melbourne.

Brisbane’s bid document suggested that between two and seven new venues would be built including a new 50,000-capacity stadium at Albion Park to serve as the main stadium, hosting athletics and the ceremonies.

However, in the feasibility document released last Thursday, the IOC said it was open to using existing facilities instead that might see athletics staged at Metricon Stadium which staged the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, with the ceremonies at either the Gabba or Suncorp Stadium.

While the "two new venues" may well include a new Olympic Stadium, they may well include a new 15,000-capacity venue for indoor sports - which could be the new Brisbane Live venue, although it is not referred to in the bid document and/or a new 10,000 plus capacity aquatic centre

However, the new aquatic facility could be temporary - perhaps within the 'Brisbane Arena' referred to in the bid document - while the IOC has suggested that the bid will consider switching swimming and water polo to the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre.

The prospect of a new aquatic centre has excited sports marketeer Ian Hanson, the Oceania Correspondent for Swimming World.

Writing online for Swimming World on Thursday, he suggested that a new inner-city pool facility would “deliver a golden legacy from Australia’s third Olympic Games”.

Looking at the Olympics proposal, he wrote “a new Brisbane Swimming Arena or the existing Gold Coast Aquatic Centre would host swimming and water polo, with diving, artistic swimming and water polo at the existing Brisbane Aquatic Centre, holding 4,300 people with marathon swimming at the Broadwater Parklands on the Gold Coast, with temporary seating for 5000.”

Chandler_Aquatic_Centre_Brisbane.jpg

Advocating for a new aquatic facility he went on to state “the SEQ region has become a swimming stronghold in Australia from the famed ‘Chandler Pool’ – now the Brisbane Aquatic Centre - situated 14 kilometres south east of the CBD to facilities that would satisfy visiting teams in some of the best locations in the world for lead up and pre-Games training camps and competitions.

“While SEQ is surrounded by more 50m pools – both public and school facilities – than any other region in the world – it lacks a modern day international standard pool – a facility that will leave a legacy from the Games for a swimming-mad city.

“Discussions are also continuing for Bond University (on the Gold Coast) and its new revamped aquatic facility (with an existing 50m pool and new 25m outdoor racing pool with scoreboard and screen) to host the International Swimming League – a major attraction for the world’s fastest swimmers – in the lead up to 2032.

“And while a major selling point for the 2032 Games is centred around existing venues and infrastructure a new aquatic centre will be central to the success of these Games – as Australia’s most successful and popular Olympic sport.”

The Brisbane masterplan even allows for canoe slalom and sprint as well as rowing to be held at the same facilities that were used during the Sydney 2000 Olympics if a whitewater and flat water canoe/kayak centre is not built in the state.

Venues proposed for a Brisbane Games.

Brisbane Venues
Athletics, Ceremonies - Brisbane Olympic Stadium (new, 50,000 capacity). (Alternative venues: Metricon Stadium, Gabba)

Swimming, Water Polo - Brisbane Arena (new, 15,000). (Alternative venue: Gold Coast Aquatic Centre)

Diving, Artistic Swimming, Water Polo - Brisbane Aquatic Centre (existing, 4,300).

Archery - South Bank Culture Forecourt (temporary, 4,000).

Basketball - Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre (new, 15,000).

3x3 Basketball - South Bank Piazza (existing, 4,500).

Track Cycling, BMX racing - Anna Meares Velodrome (existing, 5,000)

Freestyle BMX, Cross Country Equestrian - Victoria Park (temporary, 5,000/25,000)

Equestrian - Brisbane Showgrounds (existing, 15,000)

Football, Rugby Sevens - Suncorp Stadium (existing, 52,500)

Gymnastics - Chandler Indoor Sports Centre (new, 10,000)

Hockey - Ballymore (upgrade, 10,000). (Alternative venue: Gold Coast Hockey Centre)

Shooting - Brisbane International Shooting Centre (existing, 2,000)

Table Tennis, Fencing, Taekwondo, Badminton - Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre (existing, 6,500)

Boxing - Nissan Arena (existing, 6,000)

Slalom Canoe - Redland Whitewater Centre (new, 8,000). (Alternative venue: Penrith Whitewater Stadium, NSW)

Handball - Brisbane Entertainment Centre (existing, 11,000)

Modern pentathlon - Ipswich Stadium (upgrade, 20,000)

Rowing, Sprint Canoe - Larapinta Flatwater Centre (new, 14,000). (Alternative venue: Sydney International Regatta Centre, NSW)

Sailing - Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron (existing, 10,000)

Tennis - Queensland Tennis Centre (existing, 6,000)

Queensland_Tennis_Centre_Brisbane_River.

Gold Coast venues
Beach Volleyball - Broadbeach Park Stadium (temporary, 12,000)

Golf - Royal Pines Resort (existing, 15,000)

Judo, Wrestling - Gold Coast Sports and Leisure Centre (existing, 7,500)

Triathlon, Marathon Swim - Broadwater Parklands (temporary 5,000)

Volleyball - Coomera Indoor Sports Centre (existing, 11,000)

Weightlifting - Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre (existing, 6,000)

Sunshine Coast venues
Basketball (pool games) - Sunshine Coast Convention and Entertainment Centre (new, 6,000)

Road Cycling, Race Walking, Kiteboarding - Alexandra Headland (temporary, 5,000)

Mountain Biking - Sunshine Coast Mountain Bike Park (existing, 10,000)

Other venues
Keelboat Sailing - Whitsunday Islands (existing, 2,000)

Football Preliminaries -
Ipswich Stadium (upgrade, 20,000)
Cbus Super Stadium, Gold Coast (existing, 27,400)
Sunshine Coast Stadium (upgrade, 16,500)
Clive Berghofer Stadium, Toowoomba (upgrade, TBC)
Queensland Country Bank Stadium, Townsville (existing, 25,000)
Barlow Park, Cairns (upgrade, TBC)
Sydney Football Stadium (under construction, 45,000)
AAMI Park, Melbourne (existing, 30,050)

Athletes will stay in one of two Olympic villages - a 14,000-bed Brisbane development that will be converted to housing after the Games, while existing hotels on the Gold Coast would supply a further 2000 beds.

Images: Concept for a new Brisbane Olympic Stadium at Albion Park (top, credit: Urbis), the Brisbane Aquatic Centre was purpose built for 1982 Commonwealth Games (middle, credit: Sleeman Sports Centre) and the Queensland Tennis Centre (below). 

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Investing in Brisbane: how you can capitalise in the thriving property market

Domain.com.au

SUE WILLIAMSMAR 10, 2021

 

Brisbane has emerged as one of Australia’s best spots for investors after two major studies put it close to the top of their lists, even before the announcement that it’s the preferred candidate for hosting the the 2032 Summer Olympics.

Westpac’s Housing Pulse report for February 2021 reported that Brisbane dwelling prices are veering into “boom market” territory, predicting over 10 per cent growth this year.

 

“Queensland’s upswing has accelerated over the last three moths and is starting to tip into boom territory,” says the Westpac report author, senior economist Matthew Hassan. 

“Sales are running well ahead of listings, especially for houses, with stock on market down to just 3.4 months of sales in Brisbane – the long run average is five months.”

The only softer markets in the city are top- and middle-tier Brisbane units and the inner CBD.

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2 hours ago, George_D said:

Suppose Brisbane becomes the host of 2032 Olympics. Which stadium will host Ceremonies/Athletics??

Lang Park is the biggest stadium and its capacity is 52.500 seats.

Also i dont see any major arenas in Brisbane (over 10.000 seats) for sports like Gymnastics, Basketball and Volleyball that Olympics capacity requirements are too high. In commonwealth games these sports where conducted mainly in convention centres with much lower capacity

 

Brisbane the Preferred Choice for 2032 Olympics; New Aquatic Center Part of Plan

 

Credit: Swimming World Magazine

25 February 2021, 11.36pm

By Ian Hanson - Oceania Correspondent

 

A proposed new 15,000 seat aquatic centre, the Brisbane Arena, would provide the South East Queensland (SEQ) 2032 Olympics with a long sought-after Brisbane inner-city pool facility and deliver a golden legacy from Australia’s third Olympic Games.

With the International Olympic Committee’s nod of approval for the Brisbane bid this week all eyes are on the Queensland capital and surrounding Gold and Sunshine Coast cities.

And a new pool is very much in the pipeline for Australia’s swimming mecca.

A new Brisbane Swimming Arena or the existing Gold Coast Aquatic Centre would host swimming and water polo, with diving, artistic swimming and water polo at the existing Brisbane Aquatic Centre, holding 4,300 people with marathon swimming at the Broadwater Parklands on the Gold Coast, with temporary seating for 5000.

Gold_Coast_Aquatic_Centre_competition

GOLD COAST AQUATIC CENTRE: A key venue for 2032. Photo Courtesy: Gold Coast City Council.

The SEQ region has certainly been abuzz this week as BREAKING NEWS hit the airwaves that Brisbane and the SEQ region (including the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast as well as other regional centres) had been anointed as the preferred candidate for the Games of the 35th Olympiad.

The Queensland Government has revealed initial plans for a Main Stadium, an Aquatic Centre and initiated major discussion around the Athletes Village.

Both the proposed aquatic facility and a new Main Stadium would be built on the northern side of the Brisbane River.

The SEQ region has become a swimming stronghold in Australia from the famed “Chandler Pool” – now the Brisbane Aquatic Centre – situated 14 kilometres south east of the CBD to facilities that would satisfy visiting teams in some of the best locations in the world for lead up and pre-Games training camps and competitions.

It was purpose built for the 1982 Commonwealth Games and 2032 will see a special 50th anniversary milestone for the new Olympic city.

While SEQ is surrounded by more 50m pools – both public and school facilities – than any other region in the world – it lacks a modern day international standard pool – a facility that will leave a legacy from the Games for a swimming-mad city.

Discussions are also continuing for Bond University (on the Gold Coast) and its new revamped aquatic facility (with an existing 50m pool and new 25m outdoor racing pool with scoreboard and screen) to host the International Swimming League – a major attraction for the world’s fastest swimmers – in the lead up to 2032.

And while a major selling point for the 2032 Games is centred around existing venues and infrastructure a new aquatic centre will be central to the success of these Games – as Australia’s most successful and popular Olympic sport.

Vikings Luch Olympians and board

OLYMPIANS ALL ABOARD FOR 2032: Jon Sieben, Laurie Lawrence, Brooke Hanson, Justin Lemberg and Duncan Armstrong. Photo Courtesy: Hanson Media/TBD

Home to a host of individual Olympic champions from backstroking’s 1956 and 1960 back-to-back golden boy David Theile to a modern day who’s who of Australian swimming, Jon Sieben, Duncan Armstrong, Kieren Perkins, Susie O’Neill, Grant Hackett, Jodie Henry, Libby Trickett, Leisel Jones and Stephanie Rice.

And of current day stars Cate and Bronte Campbell, reigning world champion Ariarne Titmus and the likes of Emma McKeon, Mitch Larkin, Emily Seebohm, open water qualifier for Tokyo Kareena Lee and rising stars Kaylee McKeown, Minna Atherton and Lani Pallister.

Perkins is now a major power broker with his appointment as the president of Swimming Australia and he will play a key role in ensuring that his city will be ready, willing and able to host a Games to remember.

Already working tirelessly behind the scenes to make 2032 a reality has been a group of Olympic swimmers and swimming-like people who wanted to see their city join Melbourne and Sydney – making Australia the fourth country to host three or more Games – behind the USA, France and England.

People like Craig McLatchey, the former Swimming Australia executive director and former Australian Olympic Committee executive director – now Managing Director of EKS (Event Knowledge Services) – who provide the Games blueprint – and the genius behind Brisbane’s infrastructure planning – under the Sportfive (Lagardere/Sports Marketing) brand.

And Mark Stockwell, 1984 triple Olympic medallist, chairman of the Australian Sports Foundation and Chairman of the 2018 Commonwealth Games who knew if he delivered a successful Games then it would tick a huge box for 2032.

Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates, praised Stockwell and his team saying the successful Gold Coast Commonwealth Games in 2018 paved the way to secure Queensland’s case.

For Stockwell, now one of Brisbane’s most successful property developers and Olympic fundraisers, 2032 will be a huge success story for him personally – and in his city.

An 18-year-old Stockwell was a program seller at the 1982 Commonwealth Games in Brisbane so for him, a golden anniversary worth celebrating.

Along with the Aquatic Centre, Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczukflagged a proposed Brisbane Olympic Stadium with capacity to seat 50,000 people for track and field events.

Although using “The Gabba” (home of cricket and Brisbane Lions AFL) for the Opening and Closing Ceremonies and the Gold Coast’s Metricon Stadium (home of the Gold Coast Suns AFL) for the athletics were also possibilities.

“There is the option of one new big venue in terms of where we would have the opening eremony … but we may use Metricon (Carrara) as well,” Palaszczuk said.

She said the new aquatics facility, the Brisbane Arena, that is expected to hold 15,000 spectators had been proposed to host swimming and water polo events.

Ms Palaszczuk said the infrastructure required is already part of Queensland’s five-to-10-year plan.

“The Olympic Committee (is) looking for existing structures,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“They don’t want countries or states to go and invest in monumental stadiums that are not going to be used in the future.

“This is transformational infrastructure for our city and our region and it would bring huge economic benefit and jobs as part of our economic recovery as we come out of COVID.”

The Gold Coast Commonwealth Games Optus Aquatic Centre (at Southport) that also hosted the 2014 Pan Pacs, could also be used as an alternative for water-based events.

 
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