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48 minutes ago, Tejas57 said:

thats my understanding it will be a 17,000 seat arena that will hopefully take over from the outdated (and middle of nowhere) Brisbane entertainment center in Boondall (which is a 1/2 hour train ride from the CBD, and if an event goes late there is a real chance you will miss the last connecting train or bus home)

Here's one celebrating a new aquatic centre:

Brisbane the Preferred Choice for 2032 Olympics; New Aquatic Center Part of Plan

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A proposed new 15,000 seat aquatic centre, the Brisbane Arena, would provide the South East Queensland (SEQ) 2032 Olympics with a long sought-after Brisbane inner-city pool facility and deliver a golden legacy from Australia’s third Olympic Games.

As if they'd put an aquatic centre above Roma Street station.

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i believe i read somewhere (and i can not find it now) that the bid docs have been submitted to the IOC. now we wait for July

Coates plans to retire from AOC, wants to oversee Brisbane Games By Aaron Patrick on Mar 19, 2021 – 3.43pm The IOC has selected Brisbane as the preferred candidate for the 2032 G

theres already a ton of infrastructure going in anyway - Cross River Rail, Brisbane Metro, Queens Wharf for starters. This is stuff we already need and was being done. The good thing about my city hos

3 hours ago, ulu said:

Here's one celebrating a new aquatic centre:

Brisbane the Preferred Choice for 2032 Olympics; New Aquatic Center Part of Plan

As if they'd put an aquatic centre above Roma Street station.

any sugestion brisbane live would be a full time aquatic centre is ludicrous. There is simply no need for it - there is much more need for a good centrally located concert and entertainment venue in brisbane since the demolition of festival hall. 

 

if people want to swim that bad, southbank has the lagoons and the beach just down the road and the valley pool is not too far away

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36 minutes ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

One thing about Aquatic Centres in Australian cities they tend to be jammed full from opening day- they are a very successful legacy.

 

 

very true but in this case, i suspect there is some cross-communication going on. I suspect Brisbane Live will not be a full time aquatic venue but will be a general entertainment venue, with a temp pool installed for the games

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Pool above Roma Street would be pulled down after Brisbane Olympics

 

credit: Brisbane Times

By Lydia Lynch
March 2, 2021 — 3.44pm
 

An indoor swimming pool proposed atop of Roma Street station would be turned into an entertainment centre after athletes headed home from a 2032 Olympic Games hosted in Brisbane.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk confirmed on Tuesday the aquatic centre inside the planned Brisbane Live arena would be temporary.

An agreement was expected in the first half of 2021 about whether an aquatics centre would be built in Brisbane to host the swimming and water polo competitions for the Games, which the Queensland capital was favoured to host.

“We have a lot of existing venues and over the next few months and years we need to work on those missing pieces,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

 

“We know that we do need a swimming venue, so there are options there about utilising a potential Brisbane Live for swimming but there are discussions that are ongoing.

“I think that Queenslanders would love a music entertainment venue, which would be the legacy [of the Games].”

The state government has cleared the way for a new 18,000-seat venue over the Roma Street train station, which it wants the private sector to build.

Brisbane Live was conceived by music entrepreneur Harvey Lister’s company ASM Global, which operates the Brisbane Entertainment Centre at Boondall.

 

If a temporary aquatic centre was to be built inside Brisbane Live, sheets of aluminum could be clipped together and dropped to the bottom of the arena to create a pool, Mr Lister said.

“I don’t think you would build a building like this to keep a pool permanently,” he said.

 

“It would be temporary. This has been done many times, it was done in the Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne for the World Swimming Championships [in 2007].

“They can go in, and go out, it takes a little bit of time but there is no reason why that can not be done very successfully in an indoor arena.”

 

Mr Lister said after the Games the venue would be used for concerts, monster truck shows, events such as Disney on Ice and indoor sport.

“It is time that Queensland’s capital city has a venue that is similar in scale to the one in Sydney, the one in Melbourne, the one in Perth and that is certainly what the vision is for Brisbane Live,” he said.

“The Brisbane Entertainment Centre has suited its purpose really well, but it was designed about 38 years ago now.”

He said if Brisbane Live was constructed “then the government will be able to decide what it does with that building at Boondall”.

 

Mr Lister said the company had “offered right from day one to take an equity stake in the project”.

“I do not think there is anywhere in the world where a major arena like this can be built and funded by the private sector, from what the general public pays for tickets,” he said.

Ms Palaszczuk could not rule out pitching in taxpayer money to build the arena “because it may be that the federal government and the council and the state all put in a contribution”.

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Anyone have access to The Australian? This article has an interesting description in Google:

Swimming Australia president Kieren Perkins not only is completely backing the idea of Brisbane staging the 2031 world aquatic championships as a test event for the 2032 Olympics but also believes the city should chase the Pan Pacs titles in the lead-up to those events.

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/olympics/perkins-wants-brisbane-to-chase-pan-pacs/news-story/dd7c95f768199f7a157db2c0a2f54713

Pan Pacs would be due in 2030 with Canada due to host the one in 2026.

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Premier says final master planning for Olympic infrastructure underway

Credit: The Courier Mail

By Shiloh Payne

March 3, 2021 - 12:00AM
 

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has revealed infrastructure plans for the 2032 Olympic Games will be a “balancing act” as the Queensland Government looks at finalising venues for events. 

Final master planning is expected to determine a swimming venue for the Olympics, as well as the potential for a new 50,000-seat stadium.

The Premier said practical solutions were needed to prevent unnecessary infrastructure.

“There’s a lot of options that we are looking at there, whether we utilise existing stadiums or whether there can be some collaboration between local, state and federal of a new around-50,000-seat stadium,” she said.

“But this is a balancing act, we don’t want to build big new stadiums we need practical solutions.”

Ms Palaszczuk said there was potential for a temporary swimming venue at the river city’s proposed entertainment precinct Brisbane Live, with discussions ongoing. 

“Between 85 and 90 per cent of the venues are already in the southeast of our state plus utilising the Townsville Stadium as well.”

“It’s got to be practical and it’s got to be a part of the legacy – what the Olympic committee wants us to do, they want us to look at what we already have.”

It comes as Ms Palaszczuk officially opened the new Asia Pacific headquarters of Olympic venue design firm Populous.

Populous managing director Paul Henry said the architecture firm had been involved in infrastructure for about 12 Olympic Games.

“There’s a lot of work to do to define what exactly is needed for the Olympics, and one of the beauties about the announcement now is that we have more time than any other Olympic city to actually prepare in a considered way,” he said.

“Look at the Commonwealth Games on what was done with Metricon Stadium; we have the permanent facility there and then we had the temporary seats to bump up the capacity just for the Commonwealth Games; that’s the kind of initiative and thinking that happens around major Games now.”

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1 hour ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

The Aquatic Centre is a funny one- it is one legacy people actual want and use- will be financially successful, no need for a temporary fix! 

The Brisbane live area is not the right place for a permanent pool. but for the games it works great as a temp venue. It's literally on top of a major transit hub (long distance trains and buses as well as commuter trains and buses stop there)  

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17 hours ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

One thing about Aquatic Centres in Australian cities they tend to be jammed full from opening day- they are a very successful legacy.

The problem is that community pools and Olympic aquatics centres are designed very differently. London did a pretty good job of designing theirs to minimize the long-term problems of Olympic facilities and make it viable as a community swimming complex, but this came at a very high initial price of roughly 540 million Australian dollars. You could build a couple hundred community pools for that amount of money.

The needs of an Olympic aquatics centre (very high ceilings with lights and cameras for television, camera platforms, seating for thousands of fans, VIP areas, et al) are a better fit for a temporary pool in a permanent arena than a permanent pool with temporary infrastructure for media, fans, and officials.

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13 minutes ago, Nacre said:

The problem is that community pools and Olympic aquatics centres are designed very differently. London did a pretty good job of designing theirs to minimize the long-term problems of Olympic facilities and make it viable as a community swimming complex, but this came at a very high initial price of roughly 540 million Australian dollars. You could build a couple hundred community pools for that amount of money.

The needs of an Olympic aquatics centre (very high ceilings with lights and cameras for television, camera platforms, seating for thousands of fans, VIP areas, et al) are a better fit for a temporary pool in a permanent arena than a permanent pool with temporary infrastructure for media, fans, and officials.

Well they certainly weren't looking to save money by choosing an exorbitantly expensive Zaha Hadid design. Tokyo made a good decision by throwing the Zaha Hadid designed stadium plans in the trash. 

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New team behind ‘fundamental rethink’ of Brisbane’s mega-city planning

Credit: The Age

By Lydia Lynch

March 2, 2021 — 11.00pm

A specialist team will be created to ensure land stretching between Tweed Heads and Noosa is able to keep pace with population growth and housing demand.

South-east Queensland’s “200-kilometre city” is predicted to grow by 1.5 million to 5 million in 20 years, making it about the same population as Sydney today.

An extra 794,000 new homes will be needed to accommodate the boom, as the lines between Brisbane and the Gold and Sunshine coasts continue to blur.

The new planning team set up by the state government will be announced by Deputy Premier Steven Miles on Wednesday to ensure new developments can manage the surge in new residents.

“Queenslanders want to know that when they’re ready to buy their first home, they will be able to do so without being priced out of the market,” Mr Miles said.

“They want to know that when they’ve retired and they’re looking to downsize to a more manageable property, that they’ll be able to without needing to move very far away.

“And in between those stages in life they may want a family home with a big backyard.”

Mr Miles said, from 2019 to 2020, there had been a 200 per cent increase in net migration from cities to regional areas.

“We’ve also seen a 23 per cent increase in the use of our national parks and green spaces,” he said.

“This must result in a fundamental rethink of our approach to infrastructure planning and delivery.”

Mr Miles said the team’s first task would be to choose a pilot site for a new growth area by the end of the month.

“The pilot site identified will be an example of how local and state governments and the private sector can work together to plan for better communities,” he said.

“The team will also work to bring land in the under-utilised urban footprint to market sooner.

“Queensland’s population is booming, and I want to ensure our government and local councils can keep up with the increase in demand for land, housing and the supporting infrastructure that comes with it.”

The new Growth Areas Delivery team, will be an arm of state government agency Economic Development Queensland.

 

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Brisbane Live scouted for 2032 Olympics

Credit: ArchitectureAU

INDUSTRY NEWS  |  ArchitectureAU Editorial

 2 Mar 2021
 

Olympic swimmers could be racing in a new pool above Brisbane’s Roma Street railway station in 2032, according to planning documents released this February and comments by Queensland’s premier.

The $2 billion Brisbane Live entertainment centre, which was a market-led proposals that first emerged in 2016. In discussing the long-mooted proposal, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk told local media, “Brisbane Live is one of those infrastructure projects that could be used for a 2032 Olympics as well. It could be used possibly for the swimming.”

The International Olympic Committee announced on 25 February that Brisbane is the prefered host for the 2032 games.

Architecture firms Archipelago, Woods Bagot and Populous have prepared a concept design for the Roma Station precinct, included in a proposed development scheme document published by the Cross River Rail Delivery Authority.

The proposal outlines how the development of a major sport, recreation and entertainment facility would besome a centrepiece for the wider precinct that would create an attractive and human-scale interface with Roma Street and Albert Street. 

The design team note in a statement, “Our design response creatively unites the disparate topographies of these key CBD destinations in providing an Emma Miller Place design as the arrival forecourt for Brisbane Live and a civic gathering destination with its own distinctive but complementary identity.

“In emphasizing its current and historic importance as a workers gathering place the design integrates equitable and cycle access and hostile vehicle management throughout the precinct whilst concurrently delivering rich subtropical shade and catering for event activation, security screening and crowd management.”

The government has not said how long negotiations with the proponent are likely to go for.

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Brisbane set for thrifty 2032 Olympics

Credit: yahoo! news

Australian Associated Press

Tue, 2 March 2021, 4:27 pm

The Queensland government is aiming to be thrifty and creative rather than splash cash on purpose-built venues for Brisbane's 2032 Olympic bid.

The Games are set to return to Australia in 11 years' time with Brisbane and Queensland installed as preferred bidder by the International Olympic Committee last week.

Brisbane is all but certain to become the third Australian city to host the Games after Melbourne had the honour in 1956 and Sydney in 2000.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk says in the past state-of-the-art arenas and stadia would be built, but the IOC wants bidders to be thrifty.

She has warned fans not to expect flashy new venues for the 2032 Games.

"It's got to be practical and it's got to be part of the legacy, and what the Olympic Committee wants to do is they want us to look at what do we already have," Ms Palaszczuk told reporters.

"So we've got to look at value for money and we've got to look at where we need to supplement what we already have."

The Brisbane bid is yet to submit a master plan to the IOC, which will finalise the proposed venues.

Ms Palaszczuk said the swimming could occur in the yet to be built Brisbane Live entertainment arena.

AEG Ogden chairman and Brisbane Live proponent Harvey Lister said a temporary pool could easily be set up in the proposed arena.

"This has been done many times. It was done in the Rod Laver Arena in Melbourne for the World Swimming Championships," he said.

"It's a fast pool, which is really important for for swimmers, and they can go in and go out, it takes a little bit of time, but there's no reason why that can't be done very successfully in an indoor arena."

It's also uncertain where the opening and closing ceremonies would be held.

Ms Palaszczuk said the government was looking at whether to use an existing stadium like Carrara on the Gold Coast or jointly fund a new 50,000-seat venue with other levels of government.

"This is a balancing act. We don't want to build big new stadiums. We need practical solutions," the premier said.

"So we'll be looking very closely and getting the best value for money as we finalise what we need to submit."

Paul Henry, managing director of architecture and design firm Populous, which has been involved in many Olympic plans around the world, said the hosting process had evolved.

He pointed out that the upcoming 2024 Olympics in Paris was using the existing Stade de France and a range of temporary facilities.

"We're getting more creative about how we can put on Olympics with temporary facilities, but more importantly, looking at how we can make these facilities actually work long term for the city that they're in," Mr Henry said.

"Brisbane has a couple of really significant long-term urban regeneration opportunities around Cross River Rail, and the synergy of existing plans and the Olympics is a fantastic point at the moment that will bode well into the future."

 

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Development application for Kangaroo Point green bridge lodged with council

Credit: The Courier Mail

Thomas Morgan  Urban Affairs Reporter 


March 4, 2021 - 12:00AM

The development application for the striking new bridge set to span the Brisbane River between the CBD and Kangaroo Point have been lodged. 

It’s one of four green bridges the LNP administration have vowed to build in coming years.

The planning documents lodged earlier this week said “construction of the Kangaroo Point green bridge could begin as early as late 2021, with expected completion by the end of 2023.”

The bridge will be 6.8 metres wide, allowing for a pedestrian and cycle lane, 470 metres long and have a single 104m-tall mast that will be taller than the Story Bridge.

Cables attached to the mast will hold the bridge structure up above the Brisbane River, high enough to allow boats to pass safely below. 

The bridge will launch from Scott Street in Kangaroo Point and land at the corner of Alice and Edward Streets in the CBD. 

The development application for the project said a bridge between the two inner-city suburbs had been mooted as far back as the 1860s.

“Kangaroo Point green bridge is a world-class gateway to Brisbane’s city centre and Kangaroo Point Peninsula, the newest link in the city’s active green network,” the application said.

The project would now be assessed by council’s town-planners.

More pedestrian bridges are planned at Breakfast Creek in the North and between West End, Toowong and St Lucia in the West. 

Construction of the Breakfast Creek bridge could also start later this year while community consultation is underway on the two West End links. 

Public and active transport chair Ryan Murphy said the “fast-tracked” bridge would support more than 300 jobs during construction. 

“On Tuesday, council lodged the application for the works to deliver this bridge, ahead of awarding the tender for construction mid-year,” Cr Murphy said.

“Lodging an application now gives us extra time to gain important State Government approvals for the bridge,” he said.

Cr Murphy said the link would support 5400 trips per day.

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Olympic architect firm’s new Asia Pacific HQ in Brisbane

Credit: Queensland Government media statement

Published Tuesday, 02 March, 2021 at 10:58 AM

Premier and Minister for Trade
The Honourable Annastacia Palaszczuk

 

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has officially opened the new Asia Pacific headquarters of Olympic venue design firm Populous in Brisbane.

Ms Palaszczuk joined local staff and clients as well as offshore team members for a ceremony in the Populous Adelaide Street offices.

“This internationally renowned architectural firm which has designed Olympic and other outstanding facilities around the world, as well as some of our favourite local venues, makes Brisbane their main office in the Asia Pacific,” the Premier said.

“Populous has been at the top of their game for decades and today’s opening is the start of new and exciting things as they look to the future – just as we are moving further along the road to hopefully hosting the Olympics in 2032.

“Populous has a proven track record not only in designing Summer and Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games venues such as the London Olympic Stadium, but in planning events and Olympic bids.

“Since 2014, Populous has been working with the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Organizing Committee, advising on planning and design for all competition venues.

“So today is a proud and timely moment for the owners and staff, working on the very best of Olympic and other worldwide projects from new premises right here in Brisbane.”

Minister for Education and Member for McConnel Grace Grace said Queenslanders locally would know Populous as the designers of Suncorp Stadium, Metricon Stadium on the Gold Coast and the Queensland Tennis Centre at Tennyson.

“But it’s their export work that now accounts for 80 per cent of their earnings, and the number of staff the company employs across the Asia Pacific has doubled in the past 18 months to more than 200,” Ms Grace said.

“In recent years Populous has delivered a 50,000-seat indoor arena in Manila, the National Olympic Speed Skating Oval in Beijing, and the world’s largest cricket stadium in Ahmedabad.”

In recognition of those successes, Populous was the winner of the Professional Services category at the Premier of Queensland’s Export Awards in 2019 and was later named Australian Exporter of the Year at the Australian Export Awards.

Currently the Populous team is working on the $5 billion Kai Tak Sports Park in Hong Kong.

Populous Managing Director Paul Henry said 100 staff would work from the purpose-built space.

“We have been growing our business from Brisbane for 20 years and we are very proud to take this step to recommit our Asian headquarters to Queensland,” Mr Henry said.

“This is an exciting day for our staff and clients, and we are very much looking forward to continuing to collaborate across the globe as we have done well before COVID-19 on exciting projects that bring people together in moments of celebration.

“Everyone that has played a part in our success should be very proud as it is a story of hard work, vision and collaboration from people that love what they do and do it exceptionally well every day.”

 

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I need to find the article, but I read a great analysis of Olympic City costs- and there have been 3 really çheap' Games - LA, Atlanta and Sydney.

It is amazing how cheap Sydney was- but it was still the best. No hero architects or grand designs (but still the biggest venues), simple materials like corrugated steel, use if temporary stands etc. 

The state fair ground that hosted a lot of venues and the print media cost only $200 million- the print media were housed in the cattle pavilions, the broadcast media a Dept Store warehouse etc etc..I think Brisbane will be just as thrifty!

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1 hour ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

I need to find the article, but I read a great analysis of Olympic City costs- and there have been 3 really çheap' Games - LA, Atlanta and Sydney.

It is amazing how cheap Sydney was- but it was still the best. No hero architects or grand designs (but still the biggest venues), simple materials like corrugated steel, use if temporary stands etc. 

The state fair ground that hosted a lot of venues and the print media cost only $200 million- the print media were housed in the cattle pavilions, the broadcast media a Dept Store warehouse etc etc..I think Brisbane will be just as thrifty!

I'd be interested to read that if you can find it.

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This story is from May 2020 and is about the opening of the second runway at Sunshine Coast Airport. It joined Brisbane Airport in the SEQ area with a second runway.

Lights, camera, RUNWAY!

Credit: Sunshine Coast Council

04 May 2020

More than 400 lights turned on along the Sunshine Coast Airport’s new runway on Friday evening to welcome its first ever plane—a Twin Comanche— and guiding it safely in to touch down.

The flight was part of an important runway lighting test and one of the final checks required to hand the runway over to the Sunshine Coast Airport on June 13, 2020.

Sunshine Coast Airport Expansion Project Director Ross Ullman said the lighting flight test was a collaborative effort by Sunshine Coast Council and the project contractor, Sunshine Coast Airport, Civil Aviation Safety Authority and Airservices Australia, and marked another exciting milestone for the airport expansion.

“The Twin Comanche performed several approaches from both ends of runway 13/31 at a height of 200ft, checking safe operation of the ground lighting. 

“At approximately 8.20pm last Friday evening, we watched the first plane successfully touch down—a proud and historic moment for the Sunshine Coast community.

“There are 409 lights installed along the runway, linked by an impressive 50kms of electrical cabling—which is about the distance from Caloundra to the airport and back again.  

“The lights are operated by Air Traffic Control using new touch screens and connected by an airport lighting equipment room,” Mr Ullman said. 

In the final months of construction, onsite crews will complete asphalt grooving—an important process that enables water dispersion on aircraft landing and increases tyre traction on the runway. They will also be line-marking, raising a perimeter fence and constructing a conservation corridor to ensure safe passage for wildlife once the runway opens.

The new runway is longer, wider and better aligned with prevailing winds and able to accommodate larger, more fuel efficient aircraft. 

Division 8 Councillor and Economy portfolio holder Jason O’Pray said we should all feel extremely proud of this achievement and excited about the opportunities the new runway would bring.

“This new runway is, now more than ever, a critical piece of infrastructure for the Sunshine Coast,” Cr O’Pray said.

“It will play a major role in the recovery of our region post the COVID-19 pandemic, delivering new export opportunities and boosting tourism.

“By 2040, the new runway will have contributed $4.1 billion to Gross Regional Product and created 2230 new full-time jobs for our local workforce,” Councillor O’Pray said.   

Benefits to our region:

  • The new runway will provide direct access for our region to the world.
  • 2230 new full-time jobs by 2040 (direct and indirect)
  • Potential to attract over 2,000,000 passengers annually
  • Helps boost tourism and export opportunities
  • Potential to reach new destinations
  • $4.1 billion contribution to Gross Regional Product (2020-2040).
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Gold Coast Airport:

Project LIFT Terminal Redevelopment

Credit: Gold Coast Airport website

Gold Coast Airport is underway with its terminal redevelopment, Project LIFT, which will increase the airport’s capacity to meet future demand.

Driven by long-term passenger growth, Project LIFT has a number of features, including the expansion of the terminal building, additional aircraft parking stands and a consolidated ground transport facility.

Gold Coast Airport is committed to Project LIFT and believes it will deliver better services and create jobs and economic opportunities for the Gold Coast and Northern New South Wales regions.

Approval for the draft Major Development Plan was provided by the former Federal Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, the Hon Warren Truss MP on 10 February 2016, following extensive consultation with the community and other key stakeholders.

The draft has since been finalised, in consultation with the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Cities & Regional Development, and is now available as a final Major Development Plan.

Downloads:

Masterplan Part A

Masterplan Part B

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Sunshine Coast Mass Transit Project

Credit: Sunshine Coast Council

Updated: 1 March 2021

To put it simply, mass transit is a convenient and easy-to-access public transport system which moves people efficiently. A well-designed system reduces car usage, especially at peak times, and may include:

  • buses
  • trams or light rail vehicles
  • a metro or subway
  • passenger trains

The current phase of the mass transit business case process is the Options Analysis. Council will be consulting on the Options Analysis in early-2021. Previous planning has show that the highest priority for providing mass transit is in the coastal corridor from Maroochydore City Centre to Sunshine Coast University Hospital. This precinct experiences significant traffic congestion and has the greatest concentration of activities that would benefit from public transport. However, the options for staging will be reconsidered in the Options Analysis consultation phase. 

There are several options under consideration in the Options Analysis to meet the transport needs of the coastal corridor. They include:

  • business as usual
  • road network upgrades – road upgrades in the coastal corridor which would benefit all users including buses
  • region-wide bus system operation enhancements – new and existing routes with improved frequency, more direct routes and better connections
  • region-wide bus system upgrades supported by key bus infrastructure such as improved shelters, sections of bus priority lanes and park ‘n’ ride facilities
  • quality bus corridor – a high-frequency bus service running in dedicated kerbside bus priority lanes with features such as high-quality vehicles, pre-paid boarding and quality bus stops
  • bus Rapid Transit – 25 metre-long battery-powered, rubber tyred vehicles running at high frequency in a dedicated busway corridor mostly in the centre of the road with high-quality stations, pre-paid boarding and priority signalling
  • light Rail Transit - 45 metre long modern rail vehicles running at high frequency on a dedicated trackway mostly in the centre of the road with high-quality stations, pre-paid boarding and priority signalling
  • trackless tram - 32 metre long battery powered rubber tyred multi axle guided vehicles running at high frequency in a dedicated corridor mostly in the centre of the road with high-quality stations, pre-paid boarding and priority signalling
  • wLRT - A wire-free light rail system - identical to the light rail option, minus the overhead wires, with on-board batteries and charging equipment at select stations.

Project Overview

Mass Transit Options

 

 

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Townsville eyes off major Olympics event in Brisbane 2032 bid

Credit: Townsville Bulletin

By Caitlan Charles

March 6, 2021 12:00am

Townsville could play host to a major Olympic event if Queensland is successful in its 2032 bid.

 

But if the city’s state representatives get their way, it will not just be a single game played in the northern city.

Townsville MP Scott Stewart said he had been working to make sure Townsville got a slice of the Olympics pie.

While the MP would not reveal exactly what sport he had been pushing for, he said if all went to plan, Townsville would play host to the beginning, middle and end of an event, including a medal ceremony.

We’ have a lot of opportunities I think that we lend ourselves to here,” Mr Stewart said.


“We have a great opportunity to be on the front foot, where we can host one of those events to attract people from all around the world, an international competition at an Olympic standard here into town.”

Mr Stewart said there was infrastructure already in place, including the Hutchinson Builders Centre, stadium and pending redevelopment of the Townsville Sports Reserve.

With the state-of-the-art stadium and facilities available, Townsville has the capacity to host events like the soccer, sailing, skeet shooting, Rugby 7s, boxing, downhill mountain biking, table tennis, hockey and more.

In 2018 Townsville played host to basketball as part of the Commonwealth Games.

Mayor Jenny Hill said while an event coming to Townsville would be positive, she was concerned about the city missing out on crucial funding in the lead up.

Cr Hill said infrastructure spending in the years before major sporting events like the Olympics was not just about new or refurbished stadiums.

“They’re also about roads and public infrastructure like water,” Cr Hill said.

“The concern we have … is this is being pushed by the southeast council of mayors as their Olympics, and it will be a sugar hit but it’s not going to be a long term support for the rest of Queensland.”

Cr Hill said the federal government would spend billions fixing highways in the southeast while the Flinders Highway, which will be the major connection from the new Singaporean military training facility at Greenvale to the coast, would miss out.

“That is the real concern we all have, that the Olympics will focus the next 10 years worth of budgets in infrastructure at a federal and state level in the southeast corner.

“The risk is, the federal government will ignore the North,” she said.

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On 3/2/2021 at 6:07 PM, TorchbearerSydney said:

One thing about Aquatic Centres in Australian cities they tend to be jammed full from opening day- they are a very successful legacy.

But Brisbane needs a much needed modern arena. Not a swimming pool with 15,000 seater spectator capacity.

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Controversial city launches bid to steal 2032 Olympics from Brisbane

Credit: 7News

aap Published: 06/03/2021. Updated: Saturday, 6 March 2021 8:56 am AEDT

 

Qatar says it is still committed to bidding for the 2032 Olympic Games despite the the International Olympic Committee having decided to head into exclusive talks with its top choice Brisbane.

The IOC has used its new, more flexible bidding process to name the Australian coastal city as its preferred choice more than 11 years before the Games is due to begin.

Yet that decision seemed to surprise other expected candidates, including Qatari capital Doha, Germany’s Rhine-Ruhr region, and Hungarian capital Budapest.

The Qatar Olympic Committee on Friday “reiterated its total commitment to maintaining continuous dialogue” with an IOC-appointed panel which can have ongoing talks - and even approach - likely candidates for any future Games.

Doha applied to enter two previous Summer Games bidding contests but did not progress to acceptance on the IOC’s list of candidates.

One factor weighing against Qatar is searing heat in the July-August slot that the IOC prefers to hold the Summer Games.

Doha hosted the 2019 track and field world championships from late September into October, and even then there were complaints from athletes who derided the heat, the lack of spectators and flat atmosphere.

“We have listened and learned from our two previous bids and humbly believe that we are now perfectly positioned to deliver a low-risk, sustainable and world-class edition of the Games,” Qatari Olympic leader Sheikh Joaan bin Hamad bin Khalifa Al-Thani said in a statement.

The IOC has given no timetable for a decision to confirm Brisbane or to open up the contest.

German North Rhine-Westphalia premier Armin Laschet last week said it would continue with its bid for the Rhine-Ruhr region to host the 2032 Games.

After consulting with the mayors of the cities involved, Laschet announced on Friday: “We will continue to fight. The support of the cities is still there.”

“There is no question that the IOC decision on Wednesday (February 24) surprised us and also hit us,” he said.

“I was told that, for the IOC, Brisbane is a good candidate in uncertain times. I don’t share this view.”

He said the German Olympic committee didn’t see itself as being in a position to enter the conversations with the IOC.

“The amazing thing is that there is no sense of what is going on at the IOC,” he said.

Meanwhile, concerns that the 2032 Olympics could become too costly for Queensland have repeatedly received pushback since the bid progressed.

The Queensland government says it is aiming to be thrifty and creative, rather than splash cash on purpose-built venues for an event set to cost $4.5 billion.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has warned fans not to expect flashy new venues.

“It’s got to be practical and it’s got to be part of the legacy, and what the (International) Olympic Committee wants to do is they want us to look at what do we already have,” Ms Palaszczuk told reporters.

“So we’ve got to look at value for money and we’ve got to look at where we need to supplement what we already have.”

The Brisbane bid is yet to submit a master plan to the IOC, which will finalise the proposed venues - including where the opening and closing ceremonies could be held.

Palaszczuk said the government is looking at whether to use an existing stadium like Carrara on the Gold Coast or jointly fund a new 50,000-seat venue with other levels of government.

“This is a balancing act. We don’t want to build big new stadiums. We need practical solutions,” the premier said.

“So we’ll be looking very closely and getting the best value for money as we finalise what we need to submit.”

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