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51 minutes ago, Tejas57 said:

in the host city contract they are obliged to hold world championships in the Olympic sports in the lead up the games so brisbane will host it anyway

All it takes is a peek at the list of host cities for the Olympics and World Athletics Championships to know this isn't true.

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NZOC and ONOC hail potential benefits of 2032 Olympics and Paralympics in Australia

Credit/Source: Inside The Games

By Michael Pavitt, Senior Reporter

Sunday, 28 February 2021

The New Zealand Olympic Committee (NZOC) and the Oceania National Olympic Committees (ONOC) have welcomed the potential benefits of a Brisbane 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games, after the Australian bid was installed as the International Olympic Committee's preferred host earlier this week.

Australia appears set to host the Olympic Games for the third time following Melbourne 1952 and Sydney 2000, after the IOC announced on Wednesday (February 24) that it would open exclusive negotiations with as part of a targeted dialogue phase.

This followed the IOC Executive Board's decision to approve a recommendation from the Future Host Summer Commission during its remote meeting.

The IOC in 2019 established Future Host Commissions, which identify and recommend venues for the Games and enter into dialogue with prospective countries and cities over staging the Summer and Winter Olympics.

The NZOC believes athletes and sport fans in New Zealand will benefit should Brisbane be confirmed as host.

"This is really significant for New Zealand and our athletes," said Kereyn Smith, NZOC chief executive.

"A Brisbane Olympic Games would see athletes from all over the world preparing to compete and train in the Southern Hemisphere in the years ahead of the Games.

"This presents a huge opportunity for New Zealand to join Australia in hosting athletes, qualification tournaments and pre-Games training camps in the build-up to 2032.

"The New Zealand Team performed exceptionally well at the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and we would love the opportunity to again compete in this part of the world.

"We have amazing sporting officials in New Zealand so it provides the chance for them to help bring the Games to life and be involved in an Olympic Games close to home.

"And of course we can’t forget our sports fans who would be able to jump on a quick flight and enjoy amazing Olympic competition and all the atmosphere that comes with being a part of the world’s largest sporting event.

"We would be able to start looking towards these Games, planning investment and targeting our approach in order to maximise our opportunities.

"As well it would be amazing for our youth.

"Young boys and girls would be able to say 'I want to compete at the Olympic Games in Australia in 11-years-time' which is pretty special."

ONOC President Robin Mitchell, a member of the IOC Executive Board, believes the potential awarding of the Olympic and Paralympic Games to Australia could benefit the Pacific region.

Mitchell drew the comparison to Australia’s last staging of the Olympics at Sydney 2000, which he believes contributed to the development of sport in the region.

"I had that smile at 3 o'clock in the morning after a very long executive board meeting," Mitchell told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s Pacific Beat programme.

"It's so exciting and I think that excitement continues based on the feedback of the region over the past 24 hours.

"The feedback is much the same as when we were jumping up and down after Sydney were awarded the Games.

"The development of sport in the region has grown since the hosting of the Games.

"Sydney had a significant influence on the development of sport in the region.

"We now have a long build-up towards 2032, but in the meantime helping us with preparations for Paris 2024 and Los Angeles 2028.

"This is great news and augments with what the Australian Government is trying to do through their Australian Sports Partnerships Programme.

"There are a lot of smiles around the Pacific."

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6 hours ago, Tejas57 said:

in the host city contract they are obliged to hold world championships in the Olympic sports in the lead up the games so brisbane will host it anyway

They're not obliged to host anything prior to the Olympics. It's events like World Championships that prove they can host.

But warm up events like what London did in 2012 a year prior to the Olympics helps, even if it's not an official Championship.

Edited by Lord David
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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: ESPN

IOC decision puts Australian city of Brisbane on fast track to host 2032 Olympics

Associated Press
25 Feb, 2021

GENEVA -- Did the Australian city of Brisbane just get picked as the host of the 2032 Olympics?

It looked that way Wednesday when the International Olympic Committee named the bid centered on the coastal city in the state of Queensland as its preferred candidate.

The decision by the IOC's executive board puts Brisbane on a fast-track to victory 11 years ahead of the games and before several expected rival candidates have publicly developed their plans.

Officials in Brisbane, Queensland and the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) will now begin "targeted dialogue'' with an IOC panel overseeing a reformed bidding process.

The IOC's new bidding process, developed in part by Australia's top Olympic official, seeks to find a winning host more efficiently and avoid turning other campaigns into expensive losers.

The 2032 race was expected to include bids from Doha, Qatar -- which is hosting the 2030 Asian Games -- and Budapest, Hungary. Neither has launched a formal bid yet, and Wednesday's decision will likely be a deterrent for either to enter the race.

"This decision is not a decision against anybody," IOC president Thomas Bach said at a news conference. "This is just a decision in favor of one interested party at this moment in time.''

If Brisbane is eventually approved by the full IOC membership, potentially next year, it would cap the second straight unconventional bidding process for the Summer Games.

Paris and Los Angeles were awarded the 2024 and 2028 editions, respectively, at the same time when in 2017 the IOC changed its rules mid-contest to allow a double award.

Budapest's late withdrawal from the 2024 contest paved the way for Los Angeles being offered the 2028 edition unopposed.

The process was changed again for the 2032 Olympics to speed up the selection. The IOC wanted to move away from two-year bidding campaigns that ended with a host being picked seven years before the games in a contested vote.

These were typically expensive for cities, often ended with rejection of the Olympic brand by voters in local referendums, and invited controversy including allegations of vote-buying.

"This (former process) was not the best procedure, neither not for the future of the games nor for the reputation of the IOC,'' Bach said Wednesday, aiming critical comments at consultants and lobbyists hired by candidates.

In 2019, the IOC created panels for each of the Summer and Winter Games to enter into rolling dialogue with possible candidates and even approach bidders. The panels can recommend a host that may now be picked without a contested vote.

"We cannot, I suggest, continue to be damaged as we have in the past,'' John Coates, a veteran IOC member, said in 2019 while presenting the new bid process he helped shape at Bach's invitation.

Queensland's quick progress raised questions about possible conflicts of interest for Coates, who has led the Australian Olympic Committee for more than 30 years.

Coates returned to the IOC board last year as a vice president and is viewed as one of Bach's closest allies. He also leads the IOC's oversight of preparations for the postponed Tokyo Olympics this year.

Asked about the perception of Coates's role in creating a process that first benefited Australia, Bach said his colleague was not involved in the board's debate Wednesday.

"This is best practice that whenever a conflict of interest arises you solve it by not participating in related discussions or decisions," the IOC president said.

China, Germany, India, Indonesia and Russia had also worked on possible bids for 2032.

"It's not a done deal" for Brisbane, said Kristin Kloster Aasen, on IOC member from Norway who chairs the panel that engages with potential Summer games bidders. "But it's progress made today.''

"The decision to advance the process was taken now given the uncertainty the world is facing at this moment and which is expected to continue even after the COVID-19 health crisis is over,'' she said.

The IOC urges hosts to avoid building white elephant projects and control spending which typically overshoots the budget target set during a bid.

The government-backed Queensland bid was made more likely after hosting the Commonwealth Games -- a two-week multi-sport event for former British Empire countries -- at Gold Coast in 2018.

Kloster Aasen praised the region's existing venues, experience in sports hosting sports and a favorable climate in July and August, when average temperatures in Brisbane, a city of about 2.5 million people, peak at around 71 Fahrenheit.

The 2000 Sydney Olympics, which Coates helped bid for and organize, was also a popular recent success for the Summer Games.

"We are very clear that we must continue to work hard in outlining our vision for a successful Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032," Coates said in an Australian Olympic body statement.

Coates was to attend a media conference in Brisbane on Thursday morning with Queensland state Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and other officials.

Peter Conde, chairman of the Australian Institute of Sport, said Australia is well-placed to host a successful Olympics because of a more united sporting system and a sharpened focus on athlete development.

"There is no doubt that the build-up to Sydney 2000 united Australian sport and the AIS, along with our state and territory partners, have taken positive steps over the past few years to further enhance our collaboration,'' Conde said.

COVID-19 has impacted sport participation and volunteering, but Sport Australia chief executive Rob Dalton said the next decade was shaping up as one of the most inspiring periods for Australian sport.

"Things have been tough, but we've said all along that sport will play a prominent role in lifting the nation's energy and spirits again, and there are few events that can match the inspiration of a home Olympic and Paralympic Games,'' Dalton said.

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: France24.com

IOC confirms Brisbane as preferred bidder for 2032

Issued on: 24/02/2021 - 20:28Modified: 24/02/2021 - 20:27

Lausanne (AFP)

The International Olympic Committee announced on Wednesday that Brisbane was the preferred candidate to host the 2032 Games and said it would enter "targeted dialogue" with bid organisers.

"The IOC future host commission recommended that the executive committee initiate a targeted dialogue with Brisbane and the Australian Olympic Committee for the organisation of the 2032 Olympic Games," said IOC president Thomas Bach.

"The executive committee unanimously accepted this recommendation."

Australia last hosted the Olympics in Sydney in 2000.

The bid would be for the Games to be held in the state of Queensland, with Brisbane as the hub.

There had been reported interest from India and Chinese city Shanghai, while Qatar last year confirmed it was planning to bid.

A potential joint bid between South and North Korea had also been touted, while Germany had also expressed its interest in holding the Games in the North Rhine-Westphalia region.

All those hopefuls were dealt a blow by the news on Wednesday, but Bach insisted the IOC had recorded "the interest of a number of parties", although he did not identify them.

"It is not a decision against the other candidates, it is a decision in favour of a candidacy," Bach said.

He clarified that no final decision on the host city had been made, but that "more detailed discussions" with Brisbane would start, although he gave no timetable.

The bid would be focused around Brisbane and Gold Coast, which both already boast extensive sporting infrastructure.

Gold Coast held the 2018 Commonwealth Games, while Brisbane boasts 21 sports venues.

The bid also enjoys the backing of John Coates, the Australian Olympic Committee president and an influential IOC vice-president.

The awarding of the 2032 Olympics is the first to take place with a new election method adopted in June 2019 in an attempt to counter application fees and a lack of serious bids.

For the 2024 Games, Bach bemoaned the process had "produced too many losers", after Rome, Hamburg and Budapest all pulled out of the running.

In September 2017, the IOC awarded the 2024 Games to Paris and the 2028 Olympics to Los Angeles.

The IOC has since set up its "future host" commission.

It is chaired by Norwegian Kristin Kloster Aasen and its nine members are not part of the IOC executive commission.

Bach said criticisms of the process were misplaced.

"All the rules were passed unanimously by the IOC session in 2019.... to prevent any undue interference, to make it less political," he said.

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source:   Deutsche Welle  dw.com

Brisbane snags preferred bid for 2032 Olympics

Date:  25.02.2021

Australians hailed the move as a symbol of hope in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. The bid is not yet fully confirmed, however.

 

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) named Brisbane its preferred bidder for the 2032 Olympics on Thursday, with no present rivals.

The move, which was hailed as a symbol of hope after a year of pandemic measures, is not yet a done deal, however.

"It is an exciting day," said Prime Minister Scott Morrison, adding that "we've still got a long way to go."

"It was a long night...but a very mature decision from the IOC. To take a decision when you've still got a few other cities there and say 'well, we're going to go into targeted dialogue with one preferred city' was a big call by them,'' said the Australian Olympic Committee president, John Coates.

"The IOC now deal exclusively with us while we complete the questionnaire. The other cities who have shown interest have been parked...it's significant recognition," he said.

The move comes after the IOC changed its selection procedure to be "more cost-effective, prevent any undue influence, be more apolitical and increasingly objective," said IOC president Thomas Bach. 

Others working on 2032 bids

The 2032 contest was expected to include Doha and Budapest, which withdrew late from the 2024 contest. China, Germany, India, Indonesia and Russia were also working on possible bids for 2032.

Bach told reporters in Switzerland that an IOC panel overseeing the bid process would begin "targeted dialogue" with Australian organizers.

Queensland state premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said a victory would help the region recover from the coronavirus pandemic, which has flattened the local tourism industry. Australia is currently only offering a limited number of tourist flights with New Zealand, national airline Qantas on Thursday said it did not expect other international flights to restart until October.

"It would bring huge economic benefit and jobs as part of our economic recovery as we come out of Covid," Palaszczuk told ABC radio. "Most importantly, it gives us hope, it gives us something to look forward to. 2032 may be out in the distance — but [it's] that firm light at the end of the tunnel."

She added that Brisbane and surrounding cities to the north, south and west already had 85% of the venues required for the games and that was the "gamechanger" as the IOC seeks to cut the costs of hosting the games.

"We don't have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future, and this gives hope and opportunity as we got through our economic recovery and plan for the future," she said. Organizers could either build a new, 50,000-seat main stadium for the opening ceremony and track and field competition, or upgrade one of the region's existing stadiums.

Germany's Olympic officials dismayed

The move garnered criticism from German Olympic officials, who say their bid was not yet complete. 

The head of Germany's 2032 Rhine-Ruhr bid, Michael Mronz, said he was "surprised" by the decision. Mronz said the roadmap for the bid required more time to outline, and that a German candidacy would also require a "democratic referendum" which takes longer to outline than a bid "without direct citizen participation."

Because a citizens' referendum on a bid would not be held until the fall, and the financing of the Summer Games has not yet been secured, the German Olympic Sports Federation (the DOSB) decided in February not to enter into a concrete bid with the IOC. As a result, Germany was not shortlisted in the evaluation process.

It's the latest in a series of setbacks for the DOSB's ambitions of bringing the Games back to Germany. Hamburg's bid for the 2020 Olympics and Munich's bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics were both quashed by locals at referendums. These failures, and other similar ones around the world, led to Bach's push for a simplified and less competitive bidding process.

Federation President Alfons Hörmann now wants to reevaluate how to proceed. However, he said he was not surprised by the IOC's decision to choose Brisbane, as the city already fulfilled all of the necessary prerequisites for a successful bid. 

'There's still work to be done'

Australia has hosted the Olympics twice, in Melbourne in 1956 and Sydney in 2000. Brisbane and the nearby Gold Coast already have extensive sports infrastructure.

Coates said the IOC has reviewed plans and various feasibility studies, and now the "federal government has to provide its undertakings in terms of security, things that's done for any international event that comes here, border control, all of those things. So there's work to be done in that area.''

"When we started this journey...many people were skeptical. Now we're one step away from being named as the host of the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games," Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said. "Today is not the time to get over-excited, there is still plenty of work to be done.''

The Tokyo Summer Olympics are expected to be held from July 23 to August 8, 2021. They were originally planned to take place last summer, but were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: sportspromedia.com

IOC names Brisbane as preferred bid for 2032 Olympics

  •  February 25 2021          By: Ed Dixon

Australian city to enter exclusive talks to present plans and finance options.

 

  • If discussions are successful, the bid will go to an IOC Session for a vote
  • Selection as preferred bidder does not rule out other cities

The Australian city of Brisbane has been chosen as the preferred bidder for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach announced the organisation's executive board had voted unanimously to accept the Queensland city as first “non-binding” choice for the Games.

“The commitment of Australia and Oceania to Olympic sports has grown remarkably since the fantastic Olympic Games Sydney 2000,” said Bach.

“This is why we see such strong public support. We decided to seize an opportunity to take to the next stage our discussions about returning 32 years later.

“In this way, we are also acknowledging the strength of the Australian team and other athletes from across the continent of Oceania at the Olympic Games over the past decades.”

The IOC has a new, more targeted and flexible approach to future host venues which it says is permanently open to ‘exploratory, non-committal continuous dialogue with interested parties’.

In the past, a host city was selected around seven years in advance of the Games it was awarded. But the IOC has now moved to reform this process as part of efforts to reduce costs for potential bidders and to cut down the number of losing bids.

Officials in Brisbane and the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) will now enter into exclusive talks with the IOC via its Future Host Commission, enabling the city to present its plans and finance options. If talks are successful, the bid will go to an IOC Session and be voted on.

The discussions do not end hopes for other cities looking to bid and interested parties can continue dialogue with the IOC.

With Brisbane now the frontrunner for 2032, Bach has previously had to deny claims regarding a conflict of interest, given IOC vice president John Coates heads up the AOC and is a close ally of Bach.

Coates will not be involved in selection or the Future Host Commission, Bach has said.

Australia last staged the Games in 2000, with Sydney as the host. As a country, Australia will co-host the 2023 Fifa Women’s World Cup, alongside New Zealand, and is also bidding for the 2027 Rugby World Cup.

Several other countries have been linked with 2032 Olympic bids, including the likes of India, Indonesia, Germany, Turkey, Ukraine and Hungary. Qatar has also eyed hosting the Games in the future, potentially as early as 2032.

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: CNN

Brisbane is the 'preferred host' for 2032 Olympics, IOC announces

By Ben Westcott and Homero De la Fuente, CNN

Updated 0607 GMT (1407 HKT) February 25, 2021

 

(CNN) The Australian city of Brisbane is the "preferred host" for the 2032 Summer Olympics, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) announced Wednesday, in a move which officials said was designed to bring "stability" to the Games after the delay of the Tokyo 2020 edition. 

IOC President Thomas Bach announced at a news conference Wednesday that the Olympic governing body will enter a "targeted dialogue" with the Brisbane 2032 Committee and the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) over their potential to host the 2032 Games.
 
Under a new selection process for the Games approved in 2019, a candidate city is designated as "preferred host" following the start of "targeted dialogue." The city's bid must still be approved by an IOC vote.
The announcement was met with excitement in Brisbane, the capital of Queensland state and Australia's third-largest city. State Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said this was the beginning of "a new golden age for Queensland."
 
IOC President Bach said that the decision to advance the process for the selection of the 2032 Games had been made "given the uncertainty the world is facing right now."
"This uncertainty is expected to continue even after the Covid-19 health crisis is over," the IOC said in a statement Wednesday. "The IOC is considering seizing the momentum offered by the excellent project of Brisbane 2032 and the AOC, in this way, bringing stability to the Olympic Games, the athletes, the IOC and the whole Olympic Movement."
 
The pandemic has thrown preparations for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics into chaos. The Games were initially delayed by a year over concerns around the spread of the virus but questions still remain over how the event, scheduled to begin July 23, can be conducted safely in 2021.
 
At the same time, there is growing pressure from human rights groups and some Western politicians for at least a partial boycott of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics over allegations of serious human rights abuses conducted by the Chinese government.
 
The IOC said in its statement that Brisbane was chosen due to the city already having a "very advanced Games concept" using 80% to 90% already existing or temporary venues, as well as experience hosting major sporting events and a favorable climate.
 
Brisbane, a city of around 2.5 million people on Australia's east coast, hosted the 1982 Commonwealth Games and several matches of the 1992 Cricket World Cup and 2003 Rugby World Cup.
 
Australia has previously held the Summer Olympics twice; in Melbourne in 1956 and Sydney in 2000.
 
The IOC's announcement Wednesday was exciting for both Queensland and Australia, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in an Instagram post. "How good is Queensland!" Morrison said.
 
AOC president John Coates said in a statement that a lot of work still needed to be done to ensure that Brisbane's bid for the 2032 Games was a success. "We are very clear that we must continue to work hard in outlining our vision for a successful Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032," he said.
Susan Brownell, an Olympics expert and professor of anthropology at the University of Missouri-St Louis, said that the new system of selecting a host city had been put in place to try to avoid repeated, expensive bids for the Games from unsuccessful cities and an unpredictable final voting process.
 
"All of this seems to indicate that Brisbane will win the bid unless something unexpected happens, or the IOC Session suddenly rises up and resists. If Brisbane is not chosen, it will still be under consideration for future games," she said.

CNN's Carol Yuan contributed to this article.

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: ABC10 USA

Brisbane, Australia preparing for 2032 Olympics after being named preferred bid

It’s not a done deal yet but powerful Olympic official John Coates is vowing to get it across the finish line when the IOC makes the final call.

 

Author: JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer
4:55 AM PST February 25, 2021
Updated: 4:55 AM PST February 25, 2021
 

BRISBANE, QLD — There was no fanfare. No iconic announcement.

An Australian push to host the 2032 Olympics was elevated overnight to the status of preferred bid, and the people of Brisbane and southeast Queensland state woke up to the news on Thursday morning.

It’s not a done deal yet, but powerful Olympic official John Coates is vowing to get it across the finish line when the IOC makes the final call, which could be within 12 months.

 was a long night . . . but a very mature decision from the IOC. To take a decision when you’ve still got a few other cities there and say ‘well, we’re going to go into targeted dialogue with one preferred city’ was a big call by them,” Coates said Thursday. “The IOC now deal exclusively with us while we complete the questionnaire. The other cities who have shown interest have been parked . . . it’s significant recognition.”

IOC president Thomas Bach told a news conference in Switzerland on Wednesday that an IOC panel overseeing the bid process would begin “targeted dialogue” with Australian organizers.

The 2032 contest was expected to include Doha, Qatar, and Budapest, Hungary, which withdrew late from the 2024 contest to pave the way for Los Angeles being offered the 2028 Olympics. China, Germany, India, Indonesia and Russia were also working on possible bids for 2032.

Coates is a long-serving president of the Australian Olympic Committee, a vice president of the International Olympic Committee, the head of the coordination commission which assesses preparation for the Tokyo Games and an architect of the new process the IOC uses to select host cities.

He was heavily involved in Australia's successful bid and running of the Sydney Olympics in 2000.

Melbourne hosted the 1956 Olympics and Coates has said for several years that Brisbane, Australia's third-biggest city, would be next in line among the country's contenders.

He said the IOC has reviewed plans and various feasibility studies and now the “federal government has to provide its undertakings in terms of security, things that’s done for any international event that comes here, border control, all of those things. So there’s work to be done in that area.”

The government leader of Queensland state, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, said the decision puts Queensland “in the box seat" and she was confident that the federal, state and municipal governments were “absolutely united in working together to make this happen."

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison supported the bid during a meeting in Japan last year with IOC president Thomas Bach, and Palaszczuk had meetings with the IOC in Switzerland.

Palaszczuk said Brisbane and surrounding cities to the north, south and west already had 85% of the venues required for the games and that was the “gamechanger" as the IOC seeks to cut the costs of hosting the games.

“We don’t have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future, and this gives hope and opportunity as we got through our economic recovery and plan for the future," she said.

Organizers could either build a new, 50,000-seat main stadium for the opening ceremony and track and field competition, or upgrade one of the region's existing stadiums. The other main construction would be a 15,000-seat aquatic center, although there's existing facilities in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast that could be upgraded.

Brisbane hosted the Commonwealth Games in 1982, the World Expo in 1988, the G20 Summit in 2014 and the Gold Coast hosted the 2018 Commonwealth Games, using facilities across the region.

A conference of mayors spanning from the Gold Coast to the Sunshine Coast in Queensland's southeast corner has been working for six years on planning the bid. It has a proposed budget of $4.5 billion but organizers say the cost to taxpayers would be minimized by the IOC’s contribution plus sponsorship and ticketing revenue.

“When we started this journey . . . many people were skeptical. Now we’re one step away from being named as the host of the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games," Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said. “Today is not the time to get over-excited, there is still plenty of work to be done.”

 
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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: cbc.ca  Canada

Australian bid put on IOC fast track to host 2032 Olympics

The Associated Press · Posted: Feb 24, 2021 9:01 AM ET | Last Updated: February 25

 

Did the Australian city of Brisbane just get picked as the host of the 2032 Olympics?

It looked that way Wednesday when the International Olympic Committee named the bid centred on the coastal city in the state of Queensland as its preferred candidate.

The decision by the IOC's executive board puts Brisbane on a fast-track to victory 11 years ahead of the games and before several expected rival candidates have publicly developed their plans.

Officials in Brisbane, Queensland and the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) will now begin "targeted dialogue" with an IOC panel overseeing a reformed bidding process.

The IOC's new bidding process, developed in part by Australia's top Olympic official, seeks to find a winning host more efficiently and avoid turning other campaigns into expensive losers.

The 2032 race was expected to include bids from Doha, Qatar — which is hosting the 2030 Asian Games — and Budapest, Hungary. Neither has launched a formal bid yet, and Wednesday's decision will likely be a deterrent for either to enter the race.

'This is just a decision in favour of one interested party'

"This decision is not a decision against anybody," IOC president Thomas Bach said at a news conference. "This is just a decision in favour of one interested party at this moment in time."

If Brisbane is eventually approved by the full IOC membership, potentially next year, it would cap the second straight unconventional bidding process for the Summer Games.

Paris and Los Angeles were awarded the 2024 and 2028 editions, respectively, at the same time when in 2017 the IOC changed its rules mid-contest to allow a double award.

Budapest's late withdrawal from the 2024 contest paved the way for Los Angeles being offered the 2028 edition unopposed.

The process was changed again for the 2032 Olympics to speed up the selection. The IOC wanted to move away from two-year bidding campaigns that ended with a host being picked seven years before the games in a contested vote.

These were typically expensive for cities, often ended with rejection of the Olympic brand by voters in local referendums, and invited controversy including allegations of vote-buying.

"This (former process) was not the best procedure, neither not for the future of the games nor for the reputation of the IOC," Bach said Wednesday, aiming critical comments at consultants and lobbyists hired by candidates.

In 2019, the IOC created panels for each of the Summer and Winter Games to enter into rolling dialogue with possible candidates and even approach bidders. The panels can recommend a host that may now be picked without a contested vote.

Not a 'done deal' for Brisbane

"We cannot, I suggest, continue to be damaged as we have in the past," John Coates, a veteran IOC member, said in 2019 while presenting the new bid process he helped shape at Bach's invitation.

Queensland's quick progress raised questions about possible conflicts of interest for Coates, who has led the Australian Olympic Committee for more than 30 years.

Coates returned to the IOC board last year as a vice-president and is viewed as one of Bach's closest allies. He also leads the IOC's oversight of preparations for the postponed Tokyo Olympics this year.

Asked about the perception of Coates's role in creating a process that first benefited Australia, Bach said his colleague was not involved in the board's debate Wednesday.

"This is best practice that whenever a conflict of interest arises you solve it by not participating in related discussions or decisions," the IOC president said.

China, Germany, India, Indonesia and Russia had also worked on possible bids for 2032.

"It's not a done deal" for Brisbane, said Kristin Kloster Aasen, on IOC member from Norway who chairs the panel that engages with potential Summer games bidders. "But it's progress made today."

"The decision to advance the process was taken now given the uncertainty the world is facing at this moment and which is expected to continue even after the COVID-19 health crisis is over," she said.

Sydney Games were a popular success

The IOC urges hosts to avoid building white elephant projects and control spending which typically overshoots the budget target set during a bid.

The government-backed Queensland bid was made more likely after hosting the Commonwealth Games — a two-week multi-sport event for former British Empire countries — at Gold Coast in 2018.

Kloster Aasen praised the region's existing venues, experience in sports hosting sports and a favourable climate in July and August, when average temperatures in Brisbane, a city of about 2.5 million people, peak at around 22 Celsius (71 Fahrenheit).

The 2000 Sydney Olympics, which Coates helped bid for and organize, was also a popular recent success for the Summer Games.

"We are very clear that we must continue to work hard in outlining our vision for a successful Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032," Coates said in an Australian Olympic body statement

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How the IOC Announcement was reported around the world:

Credit/Source: The Sun Newspaper UK

 

BRIS-GAIN Brisbane given 2032 Olympics boost after chiefs name Aussie city as preferred host bidder for games

By Ian Tuckey

  • 24 Feb 2021, 22:07  Updated: 24 Feb 2021, 23:24

 

OLYMPIC chiefs have named Brisbane their preferred bidder to host the 2032 Games.

Queensland is now strong favourite after the International Olympic Committee unanimously backed the Australian state as its first "non-binding" choice. 

Russia, Indonesia, Budapest, China, Doha and Germany's Ruhr valley have also shown interest.

But Queensland capital Brisbane won bonus points for having many suitable sporting venues, an impressive masterplan, experience in organising major events and favourable weather.

IOC president Thomas Bach said: "The commitment of Australia and Oceania to Olympic sports has grown remarkably since the fantastic Olympic Games Sydney 2000.

"This is why we see such strong public support. We decided to seize an opportunity to take to the next stage our discussions about returning 32 years later.

“In this way, we are also acknowledging the strength of the Australian team and other athletes from across the continent of Oceania at the Olympic Games over the past decades."

The IOC changed its bidding rules in 2019 to cut costs and make the process easier for cities. 

It means there are no official candidate cities campaigning ahead of the ultimate decision.

Instead the Future Host Commission will IOC will undertake another review of the options before the final vote, on a date as yet undecided.

Commission head Kristin Kloster Aasen said of Brisbane's bid: "They are a very advanced project, a number of criteria that sit very well with us.”

"It has been moulded for a number of years, good legacy plans, good venue plan.

"There are many, many things that made us put this forward."

Queensland's government-backed bid always looked in a powerful position, having successfully hosted the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in 2018. 

 

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Olympics bid: Feds on board for security, visas, anti-doping

Credit/Source: The Courier-Mail

By Matthew Killoran

March 1, 2021 - 12:00AM

 

Another hurdle has been cleared in Queensland’s bid to host the 2032 Olympic Games, with the Federal Government moving to guarantee vital services.

SOUTHEAST Queensland’s ambitious bid to host the 2032 Olympic Games is all but certain to clear the next hurdle, as the Federal Government moves to guarantee vital services including visas, security and anti-doping. 

The bid took a huge leap forward last week when it became the International Olympic Committee’s preferred bidder for the global mega event. 

The next big step includes signed agreements being delivered to the IOC from different levels of government committing to essential services.

Priority guarantees are expected by April, with further decisions required in May ahead of the Tokyo Olympics in July.

Prime Minister’s representative to the Olympics bid Ted O’Brien said the Federal Government was backing the games and that would continue.

“There’s a range of services that we’ll be asked to guarantee including immigration, national security, quarantine, biosecurity, anti-doping and so forth, and I don’t foresee problems with any one of these,” he said. 

“The mechanics of hosting big global events don’t occupy the minds of everyday Australians which is fair enough, but Australia is arguably the best in the business when it comes to delivering the services required.

“It’s one of the reasons we’re considered such a safe pair of hands.”

Other guarantees to be required will include venues, public transport and funding, with discussions continuing between the three levels of government.


Mr O’Brien said Australia had hands-on experience hosting major international sporting events, including the AFC Asian Cup 2015, the Sydney 2018 Invictus Games, the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup 2020.

Coming up on the sporting calendar are FIBA Women’s World Cup in 2022, the 2022 UCI Road World Championships, the FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2023 and a bid for the Rugby World Cup in 2027. 

 

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said last week that the state would begin assessing “in detail” what venues would host events.

“We’ve got to go down to the fine print and make sure we’ve got all the funding lined up between all levels of government,” she said.

Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates has said there remains a lot of work to be undertaken as the candidature process continues.

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All levels of government must work together on 2032 Olympic Games bid

Credit/Source: The Courier Mail

By Peter Gleeson

March 1, 2021 - 12:00AM

The time for talk is over and the three tiers of government in this country must now put their heads together and sort out the financial commitments attached to Queensland hosting the 2032 Olympics.

As the Australian Olympic Committee and the Brisbane-based taskforce set about satisfying the International Olympic Committee’s final demands, it is incredibly important that the fiscal protocols be ironed out quickly.

Up until now, the Federal Government has committed $10 million to the feasibility study and the Queensland Government has poured millions of dollars into getting the taskforce set up and the quality work undertaken by bureaucrats to satisfy certain IOC benchmarks.

But the real work starts now. Queensland must now satisfy the IOC that it is the real deal. That means Federal, State and local government signing off on the necessary funding requirements attached to infrastructure, venues, safety and security. The IOC’s new funding model ensures a cost-neutrality for the host city, and in Queensland’s case, 75 per cent of the existing sports venues and facilities are already built.

The IOC will gift the Brisbane bid a $2.4 billion cheque, proceeds from the United States TV broadcast deal, to ensure a major stadium and athletes’ village are built. These are likely at Albion Park raceway and the village is earmarked for the Hamilton wharf area.

Just a few weeks ago, Queensland’s 2032 Olympic bid chiefs – including premier Annastacia Palaszczuk – did a late night three-hour presentation to the International Olympic Committee. Other countries such as Indonesia, India, Canada, China, Russia and Qatar did the same presentation, outlining why they should be the IOC’s choice as the preferred candidate for the 2032 Olympics.

Australia’s bid was already the front-runner. Right from the start, the IOC has been impressed with the stability and safe bet of the south-east Queensland proposal. We tick a lot of boxes. According to those who saw the presentation, Queensland hit it out of the park, particularly around social justice and gender equity benchmarks. The IOC is big on putting athletes first.

Ms Palaszczuk is at pains to point out that this will be a Games for all of Queensland, pointing to events being held in regional cities such as Townsville and Cairns. 

Convincing the regions of its value will be a big challenge.

However, make no mistake about the impact an Olympic Games will have on the entire state.

The tourism benefits alone are priceless. For example, Sydney grew up after 2000. it became a true world class destination. 

Queensland now has the chance to grow as the rest of the world watches on. 

If we get the green light in July, over the next 12 years, Queensland will undergo the most extraordinary growth spurt as people flock here for the lifestyle and opportunities.

Much of the credit must go to Ms Palaszczuk and AOC boss John Coates. 

They have believed in this project from 2015. When we are hopefully announced as the host city for 2032 in July, both Ms Palaszczuk and Mr Coates can safely take a bow. 

Their legacy to Queensland will be enshrined.

But this is international politics and the stakes are extraordinarily high. We can’t take our eye off the ball, even for a second. 

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On 2/26/2021 at 7:54 AM, Tejas57 said:

i was driving around Brisbane last night and you could not keep the smile off my face. I was thinking about potential pre-Olympics training camp venues just in the Brisbane area and two  came to mind.

 

1 - The university of Queensland  (8.5 Km from the CBD by road) 

Sports: Rugby, Athletics, field sports, Swimming, Fencing, Hockey, Squash, Volleyball and Weightlifting

 

UQ is Queenslands oldest university and has facilities for a far number of sports - a 50m swimming pool, purpose built hockey and rugby fields and a proper athletics track with some field sport (javelin, discus, shot put, long and high jump).

it is also relatively isolated at the riverside suburb of St Lucia, but with excellent transport links to other areas (UQ is the second biggest destination for public transport outside Brisbane city, with multiple bus and fast ferry links to the CBD and by the time the games are here the Brisbane metro should be up and running)

The only downside is accommodation, as whilst there are student colleges this is likely to be full with students at the time, but this would be where i pick if i was organizing a national teams pre-games camp

 

2 -  Griffith Uni / QEII Stadium

Sports: Rugby, Athletics, field sports (14 Km to CBD by road)

 

I've put these two venues together as QEII is used by Griffith uni for things like exams (and i think it is managed by them too) as well as being right next to each other. This is dependent on what Brisbane do for a new stadium (if they do indeed build one or refurbish or refurbish QEII)  

QEII was the stadium used in the Brisbane commonwealth games and is still in decent shape. Once again accommodation is an issue but it is more isolated than UQ and this could be an advantage

 

In terms of live sites, with big screens and possibly entertainment, i would have the following sites;

 

1 - King George Square. Brisbane's City Square and a natural gathering place for the people of Brisbane. often used as a site of protest  and gatherings such as Christmas markets, this is almost a definite live site

 

2 - Southbank. The site of Expo 88 this is a beautiful site that is open for the people of Brisbane. I have seen reports this will be the site of the archery, and there are some spots where a big screen can be set up and poeple can gather.

 

3 - Queens Wharf sky deck - as part of the multibillion doller development of a high end shopping mall, casino and hotels the is also a large number of public spaces planned including an open air cinema

 

4 - Cavill Ave, Surfers Paradise. another open air mall. This site could be on the beach at the end of Cavill ave which is used for Schoolies (a big celebration when students finish high school) or the mall itself

 

 

Hi Tejas57, as you move around Brisbane and SEQ in your travels, any photos you can periodically post here of venues / sites / traing camp possibilities / infrastructre work/ construction / progress would be much appreciated all around :)

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First look: New designs showcase how Gold Coast railway station will look

Credit/Source: The Courier Mail

By Paul Weston

March 1, 2021 - 12:10PM

GOLD Coast commuters are being given a sneak peek at advanced plans for the city’s newest train station.

WORK STARTS ON THREE NEW STATIONS

Early investigations are underway including geotechnical works, surveying and environmental studies after 1150 people took part in consultation. 

The new image for Pimpama station shows a modern two-level station surrounded by trees.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk expects about 20 full-time jobs would be created through the transformational project’s detailed design process.

GHD, along with its architecture arm GHD Woodhead, have been awarded the design contract. 

“This is the very first important step towards building three new stations on the Coast as part of my government’s $56 billion infrastructure guarantee,” the Premier told the Bulletin.

The Palaszczuk Government will on Monday announce plans for the start of detailed design work for the Glitter strip’s three new Cross River Rail stations at Pimpama, Merrimac and Helensvale North.

“Investing in these stations alongside our $1 billion M1 upgrade, $1.5 billion second M1 and $709 million light rail stage 3 is an important part of our economic recovery and will put the Gold Coast in the fast lane when it comes to transport and jobs through COVID-19.”

Transport Minister Mark Bailey predicted as many as 100 GHD workers would be involved during the detailed design process.

CONTROVERSY OVER LOCATION OF NEW STATION

“Most of the workforce is local, including graduate engineers and scientists and cadet technicians based in GHD’s Gold Coast and Brisbane offices,” he said.

“GHD will refine the existing concept designs for each station, producing detailed designs, documentation and approvals ready for construction.

“As part of the detailed design phase, additional studies will be undertaken including construction methodology, noise modelling, flood modelling and flora and fauna studies.

“Community feedback and input is being considered as part of the detailed design phase and there will be another opportunity for public consultation on the updated designs later this year, with nearby communities to be notified well in advance.”

Gaven MP Meaghan Scanlon said the important step with design would ensure the stations would be ready by 2025 when Cross River Rail begins operation.

“The first concept images are exciting for our community, and show the opportunities that the Palaszczuk Government is creating by investing in public transport on the Coast,” she said.

“Getting started now means that within a few years Gold Coasters in our booming northern suburbs will be able to catch a train to the rest of the Gold Coast, to Brisbane and connect with our light rail.”

GHD’s General Manager, South Queensland operations Richard Evans said the company was “delighted” to work on the detailed designs of the three stations, having already delivered the station concept designs and business cases.

“These three new stations will play a vital role in the continued growth of the Gold Coast and Queensland communities,” he said.

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‘It is epic down there’: First look at Brisbane’s new underground station

Credit/Source: Brisbane Times

By Lydia Lynch

March 1, 2021 — 3.28pm

The first 400 metres of tunnels have been dug for Brisbane’s new underground station at Roma Street.

Roma Street will be one of four underground stations built as part of Cross River Rail - the others will be at Boggo Road, Woolloongabba and Albert Street.

Visiting the site on Monday, Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said Roma Street would be Brisbane’s “equivalent of a grand central station”.

“This is the type of infrastructure that is needed for a 2032 Olympics,” she said.

“The station will be 27 metres below ground level and have two 220-metre platforms and by 2036 there should be 46,000 people expected to use this station alone every weekday.”

Two boring machines were lowered into the ground at Woolloongabba earlier this year, each digging a tunnel under the Brisbane River towards Roma Street.

The machines were expected to tunnel under the Kangaroo Point Cliffs and to break through to the Albert Street site in mid-2021 before they emerged at Normanby at the end of the year.

Transport Minster Mark Bailey travelled six storeys below ground on Monday to inspect the site and said excavation of the 280-metre-long station cavern was almost finished.

“It is absolutely epic down there,” he said.

“This is something that will have a wow factor for Brisbane passengers when it is complete and those trains are coming through.

“Seeing it emerge underground, it is really quite extraordinary.”

Mr Bailey said many people did not appreciate the “sheer scale of work taking place under their feet”.

“Late last year we said goodbye to Brisbane’s ugliest building, the Brisbane Transit Centre, and now piling work has started to stabilise the ground in preparation to excavate the station building shaft,” he said.

“More than 385 metres of tunnels has been excavated so far.”

“If 1 William Street was put on its side and shoved underground, it still wouldn’t be as long as Roma Street’s station cavern once it’s fully excavated,” he said.

The new Roma Street station will open when Cross River Rail starts operating in 2025.

 

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3 hours ago, AustralianFan said:

Hi Tejas57, as you move around Brisbane and SEQ in your travels, any photos you can periodically post here of venues / sites / traing camp possibilities / infrastructre work/ construction / progress would be much appreciated all around :)

not a problem at all. as things move towards 2032 i'll take as many photos of games related things i can

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Olympic-size pool could make waves above Brisbane’s Roma Street station

 

Credit: Brisbane Times

 

By Lydia Lynch
March 1, 2021 — 10.00pm
 

An Olympic-size pool might be built in the heart of Brisbane’s CBD as part of an entertainment arena proposed for Roma Street station.

The state government’s planned 18,000-seat Brisbane Live venue over Roma Street train station was put to market more than a year ago to gauge the interest of private-sector investors.

At one point more than 20 “key industry players” were interested in investing in the venue, but only one had submitted an official proposal.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk confirmed one pitch had been submitted since her government cleared the way for the new arena, but she could not say how long it would take government to consider it.

 

“Government is in discussions with the proponent, so I cannot say anything more about that,” she said.

“Brisbane Live is one of those infrastructure projects that could be used for a 2032 Olympics as well.

“It could be used possibly for the swimming.”

Brisbane is in the box seat to host the 2032 Games after the International Olympic Committee named south-east Queensland as its preferred candidate last week.

Bid organisers have insisted they can host cost-neutral Games, under a plan to use legacy facilities from the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games and Sydney 2000.

 

Brisbane’s bid document pitched seven new facilities being built and Ms Palaszczuk said the state already had 85 per cent of venues needed for the Games.

“We don’t have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future and this gives us hope and opportunity as we go through our economic recovery and plan for the future,” she said.

An agreement was expected in the first half of this year about whether a new aquatics centre would be built in the river city, to house the swimming and water polo competitions.

But the IOC also stressed the bid would consider switching those events to the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre at Southport.

 

Planning documents released last month revealed the Cross River Rail Delivery Authority intended to push on with plans to build the Brisbane Live arena regardless of whether it would include a swimming pool.

 

“A major sport, recreation and entertainment facility could anchor the [Roma Street] precinct with supporting cultural, recreation, community, food and beverage and tourist facilities,” the planning document read.

The documents also showed plans to prioritise pedestrian access along Albert Street.

“Over time Albert Street is to be transformed into a green spine, landscaped and prioritised for pedestrians and cyclists, extending through the city centre connecting Roma Street Parkland to the City Botanic Gardens,” the documents said.

 

Parts of Albert Street have been permanently closed to vehicles as part of the Cross River Rail construction.

 
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I've seen multiple articles calling the new Brisbane Live arena an aquatic centre when I was under the impression it's a multi-purpose arena that they'll put a temporary pool in like they did with Rod Laver Arena for world champs in 2007.

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40 minutes ago, ulu said:

I've seen multiple articles calling the new Brisbane Live arena an aquatic centre when I was under the impression it's a multi-purpose arena that they'll put a temporary pool in like they did with Rod Laver Arena for world champs in 2007.

thats my understanding it will be a 17,000 seat arena that will hopefully take over from the outdated (and middle of nowhere) Brisbane entertainment center in Boondall (which is a 1/2 hour train ride from the CBD, and if an event goes late there is a real chance you will miss the last connecting train or bus home)

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