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1 hour ago, 2018 said:

This is embarrassing. Paris, Tokyo, LA, then Brisbane?? What a let down for the IOC. Should have waited for a better bid.

from who? The Indonesia and India bids were basically no-goers after the debacle of Rio, The north and south korea is a fanciful bid at best and the Rhine-Ruhr bid was withdrawn. 

 

Barcelona and Atlanta were in the same place when they got the olympics. they were known but were not a destination. the olympics changed that

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As a Brisbane based politics nut even i struggle to see where this is going. Sure the north and west traditionally vote conservative, but it;s the city seats where the election is won, and given whats

theres already a ton of infrastructure going in anyway - Cross River Rail, Brisbane Metro, Queens Wharf for starters. This is stuff we already need and was being done. The good thing about my city hos

Sorry George_D, I should have clarified. At Athens 2004,  there was 2 outside permanent pools, one 50m  for the swimming competition and one permanent 25m pool in an area between the swimming pool and

 

How Brisbane would be transformed for the 2032 Olympics

Credit: Courier-Mail

By Dan Knowles

February 26, 2021 - 10:58AM

A new 50,000 seat stadium, a 14,000 bed athletes village and huge changes to roads and public transport infrastructure – here’s how Brisbane would change for the 2032 Olympic Games.

 

BRISBANE would be transformed from a regional city to a world famous international destination almost overnight if it can secure the 2032 Olympic Games.

The detailed report into the 2032 bid released early Thursday for the first time reveals details of what the southeast Queensland region could become with a Games.

The blueprint includes a 14,000 bed athletes village at Hamilton North Shore, described as Queensland’s largest riverfront urban renewal, as well as hinting at more public housing.


The massive 40ha to 50ha site would include a mixture of housing and commercial properties after the Games, as well as housing pop-up sites during the sporting event.

A 50,000 seat stadium is on the drawing board for Albion, but alternatives include using the iconic Gabba for opening and closing ceremonies and moving the athletics down the Gold Coast to Carrara.

Lang Park would host the football, but the event will extend beyond Brisbane and the coasts to include preliminary matches in Toowoomba, Cairns, Townsville, Ipswich and even Sydney and Melbourne according to the IOC report.

The long-debated Brisbane Live is listed as being ready for a construction agreement by the middle of this year, and hosting the swimming in a temporary pool.

There would also be special Games-only vehicle lanes, Games-family lanes shared with buses and separate lanes left to the public.

All workers and spectators would have to get to venues by public transport, the report says.

The IOC also cautioned against building too many new venues, including looking at alternatives for the new Albion stadium and using existing venues in Sydney for the whitewater rafting and rowing would mean not having to build new centres in Larapinta or Redlands.

Moving the basketball prelims mooted for the Sunshine Coast would also cut another new venue.

It suggested considering Carrara Stadium on the Gold Coast for the athletics and the Gabba for ceremonies, moving the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games Optus Aquatic Centre for the swimming and moving the basketball to Brisbane Live.

On the Gold Coast, Broadwater Parklands could get the triathlon, the GCCEC the volleyball prelims and weightlifting, Broadbeach the beach volleyball and Federation Park a festival and live site, with Kurrawa Beach a sport zone and live broadcast area.

About 2000 athletes would have their own village using existing hotels, the plan says.

On the Sunshine Coast, Alexandra Headland could host the cycling, some athletics and kiteboarding, the proposed convention and exhibition centre the basketball prelims and the Sunshine Coast Mountain Bike Park could host its sport.

There would also be a day village for athletes in Maroochydore.

Further north, the Whitsundays would get keel boat sailing, with Cairns and Townsville football preliminaries.

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Rings of power: the main players behind Brisbane’s Olympic Games bid

Credit: Brisbane Times

February 25, 2021 — 1.56pm
 

The International Olympic Committee’s decision to name Brisbane as its preferred candidate for the 2032 Olympics puts the Queensland capital on a fast-track to victory 11 years ahead of the games and before several expected rival candidates have publicly developed their plans.

Officials in Brisbane, Queensland and the Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) will now begin targeted dialogue with an IOC panel overseeing a reformed bidding process.

 

 

These are the main players behind Brisbane’s bid for Olympics glory:

  • John Coates, Australian Olympic Committee president and International Olympic Committee vice president: Coates is one of most powerful people in Australian sport, leading the AOC for more than 30 years. He was central player in the bid for and organisation of the Sydney Olympics, and looks set for a repeat performance.
  • Thomas Bach, IOC president: Bach, a German lawyer and former Olympic fencer, is a close ally of Coates. A diplomatic communicator, Bach described the Brisbane bid as “a decision in favour of one interested party at this moment in time”.
  • Kristin Kloster Aasen, Future Host Commission chair: The commission explores, creates and oversees interest from potential hosts to host the Summer and Winter Games. It made the key recommendation for Brisbane to the IOC executive.
  • Scott Morrison, Annastacia Palaszczuk and Adrian Schrinner; the Prime Minister of Australia, the Premier of Queensland and the lord mayor of Brisbane: The co-operation through three levels of government was vital to gaining the IOC green light.
  • Mark Jamieson, the Sunshine Coast Council mayor and Council of Mayors (SEQ) delegate: He spearheaded the early bid proposal. Jamieson and then Brisbane lord mayor Graham Quirk first met with Bach about the idea in April of 2015.
     
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Brisbane 2032 Olympic venues revealed

Credit:  Austadiums

Friday 26th February 2021

 

With Brisbane declared as the ‘preferred candidate city’ of the 2032 Olympics, potential venues have been revealed in the bid document, including a new 50,000-capacity stadium. See the full list below.

Officials are planning to host an Olympic Games that’ll break-even – avoiding the mistakes of previous hosts were huge sums of money have been spent building stadiums that end up as white elephants.

Not only will Brisbane’s Olympics expand to the entire south-east Queensland, but some venues may even be used in Sydney, built for the 2000 Olympics, while football preliminaries would also be played in Sydney and Melbourne.

Brisbane’s bid document pitched as many as seven new venues being built, with the potential to reduce to just two new venues. Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said “We already have 85 per cent of the venues at the moment. It’s a new norm, which means it’s a game changer.”

The bid document proposes a new 50,000-capacity stadium at Albion to serve as the main stadium, hosting athletics and the ceremonies, however in the feasibility document released on Thursday, the IOC said it was open to using existing facilities instead. Options include hosting athletics at Metricon Stadium which staged the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games, with the ceremonies at either the Gabba or Suncorp Stadium.

At this stage, just two sports would be guaranteed to be played in new purpose-built venues, with basketball slated for a new 15,000-capacity Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre, while a new 10,000-capacity Chandler Indoor Sports Centre would replace the existing Chandler Arena to host gymnastics.

A new aquatic centre boasting a 15,000-capacity could also be built in Brisbane, but the IOC has stressed the bid will consider switching swimming and water polo to the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre at Southport.

The Brisbane masterplan even allows for canoe slalom and sprint as well as rowing to be held at the same facilities that were used during the Sydney 2000 Olympics if a whitewater and flat water canoe/kayak centre is not built in the sunshine state.

The traditional home of Queensland Rugby, Ballymore, would be transformed into a 15,000-capacity Hockey venue. Redevelopment work at the iconic stadium commenced last week to modernise its facilities.

BRISBANE VENUES

Athletics, Ceremonies – Brisbane Olympic Stadium (new, 50,000 capacity). (Alternative venues: Metricon Stadium, Gabba)

Swimming, Water Polo – Brisbane Arena (new, 15,000). (Alternative venue: Gold Coast Aquatic Centre)

Diving, Artistic Swimming, Water Polo – Brisbane Aquatic Centre (existing, 4,300).

Archery – South Bank Culture Forecourt (temporary, 4,000).

Basketball – Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre (new, 15,000).

3x3 Basketball – South Bank Piazza (existing, 4,500).

Track Cycling, BMX racing – Anna Meares Velodrome (existing, 5,000)

Freestyle BMX, Cross Country Equestrian – Victoria Park (temporary, 5,000/25,000)

Equestrian – Brisbane Showgrounds (existing, 15,000)

Football, Rugby Sevens – Suncorp Stadium (existing, 52,500)

Gymnastics – Chandler Indoor Sports Centre (new, 10,000)

Hockey – Ballymore (upgrade, 10,000). (Alternative venue: Gold Coast Hockey Centre)

Shooting – Brisbane International Shooting Centre (existing, 2,000)

Table Tennis, Fencing, Taekwondo, Badminton – Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre(existing, 6,500)

Boxing – Nissan Arena (existing, 6,000)

Slalom Canoe – Redland Whitewater Centre (new, 8,000). (Alternative venue: Penrith Whitewater Stadium, NSW)

Handball – Brisbane Entertainment Centre (existing, 11,000)

Modern pentathlon – Ipswich Stadium (upgrade, 20,000)

Rowing, Sprint Canoe – Larapinta Flatwater Centre (new, 14,000). (Alternative venue: Sydney International Regatta Centre, NSW)

Sailing – Royal Queensland Yacht Squadron (existing, 10,000)

Tennis – Queensland Tennis Centre (existing, 6,000)

GOLD COAST VENUES

Beach Volleyball – Broadbeach Park Stadium (temporary, 12,000)

Golf – Royal Pines Resort (existing, 15,000)

Judo, Wrestling – Gold Coast Sports and Leisure Centre (existing, 7,500)

Triathlon, Marathon Swim – Broadwater Parklands (temporary 5,000)

Volleyball – Coomera Indoor Sports Centre (existing, 11,000)

Weightlifting – Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre (existing, 6,000)

SUNSHINE COAST VENUES

Basketball (pool games) – Sunshine Coast Convention and Entertainment Centre (new, 6,000)

Road Cycling, Race Walking, Kiteboarding – Alexandra Headland (temporary, 5,000)

Mountain Biking – Sunshine Coast Mountain Bike Park (existing, 10,000)

OTHER VENUES

Keelboat Sailing – Whitsunday Islands (existing, 2,000)

Football Preliminaries –
Ipswich Stadium (upgrade, 20,000)
Cbus Super Stadium, Gold Coast (existing, 27,400)
Sunshine Coast Stadium (upgrade, 16,500) 
Clive Berghofer Stadium, Toowoomba (upgrade, TBC)
Queensland Country Bank Stadium, Townsville (existing, 25,000)
Barlow Park, Cairns (upgrade, TBC)
Sydney Football Stadium (under construction, 45,000)
AAMI Park, Melbourne (existing, 30,050)

Athletes will stay in one of two Olympic villages – a 14,000-bed Brisbane development that will be converted to housing after the Games, while existing hotels on the Gold Coast would supply a further 2000 beds.

The international broadcast and media would be based in a temporary facility near the proposed main stadium at Albion in Brisbane.

It's proposed a Brisbane Olympics would run from 23 July to 8 August in 2032. Overall, it will cost $A4.45bn to operate the games, which will be privately-funded. At least US$1.8bn of that money — $2.27bn, according to today’s exchange rate — would be provided by the IOC to Queensland Olympic organisers from the split of international broadcast fees. The rest would be made up of ticket sales, local sponsorship and merchandise sales.

 

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Cricket leads charge for sports seeking spot at a 2032 Brisbane Olympics

Credit: WA Today

By Anthony Colangelo and Roy Ward

February 26, 2021 — 2.04pm

Cricket, lawn bowls, mixed martial arts, squash and softball have declared their desire to take part in the 2032 Olympic Games, which look destined to take place in Brisbane.

On Thursday the International Olympic Committee announced Brisbane is the preferred candidate to host the 2032 event, entering into exclusive discussions with Australian bid organisers to bring the Olympics down under for the third time.

The news has sparked interest among several sports as they begin to jockey for a seat at the table at one of the planet’s biggest sporting events.

A Cricket Australia spokesman said the governing body was delighted to hear the news about the Brisbane bid, saying CA hoped cricket could be one of the sports the host nation’s Olympic Committee recommends for inclusion in Brisbane.

“We will absolutely work closely with the Queensland Olympic Council to ensure cricket is front of mind,” the spokesman said.

“Cricket is a truly national sport here in Australia and it would just be fantastic to see our sport represented at the Olympics, whatever the format may be. That dream of representing your country and even winning an Olympic gold medal could become a reality for many of our junior cricketers.

“Introducing sports familiar to the host nation will be critical to engaging fans, and we’ve seen that for this year’s Olympics in Tokyo with the additions of sports more familiar to the Japanese audience.”

An ICC source speaking on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to comment publicly about the organisation’s position said the governing body had Olympic ambitions.

They said that the ICC was not yet ready nor committed to making a formal bid to join the Olympics, so they would instead be relying on organisers for the 2028 Los Angeles Games or the potential 2032 Brisbane Games making the sport a host city pick.

Cricket was played at the 1900 Olympics in Paris, with only the UK and France competing in a two-day game.

About 25 sports are considered “core” to the Olympic program, including athletics, swimming, weightlifting, gymnastics and hockey, while others, like softball, have their place reviewed more regularly.

Sports outside of the program regularly lobby to join it, like squash (unsuccessfully) and golf (successfully for Rio 2016).

There are rules that guide how IOC members decide on the Olympic program – like their history, governance record, popularity, business model and value-add potential – but some have more influence than others.

For the Tokyo Games sports perceived as popular with young people, and popular in Japan, were added at the recommendation of Japan – baseball/softball, karate, skateboard, sports climbing and surfing.

Breakdancing has been added for the Paris 2024 Games.

In other words, the host country can pick the sports it wants.

The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) directed questions about MMA at the Olympics to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation, which said: “The IMMAF would love amateur MMA to feature in the 2032 Olympic Games.″

While softball featured at the Olympics from 1996 to 2008, it disappeared until being re-selected for Tokyo.

 

Softball Australia and the World Baseball and Softball Confederation want it at the 2032 Games.

It won’t be at Paris 2024 but given baseball and softball’s popularity in the US and Australia there is optimism it will feature in 2028 and 2032.

“We have won a medal every time softball has been to the Olympics,” Softball Australia chief executive David Pryles said.

Bowls Australia chief executive Neil Dalrymple is convinced his sport has a place at the Games, saying Brisbane would be the ideal entry point.

Bowls is still a heavily Commonwealth-based sport but is growing fast in China, Malaysia and Hong Kong, while it proved a drawcard during the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast with Broadbeach Bowls Club turning into a vibrant location.

“As a host country, bowls is intrinsic to Australian society and the bonus is that our facilities are exceptional, especially in Queensland,” Dalrymple said.“[For the Paralympics] bowls as a sport can be modified very easily to allow people with different disabilities to play it.”

Squash has been knocking on the Olympic door for over a decade, with 20 million players around the world, an established professional world tour and events in the Commonwealth Games, Pan American Games and Asian Games. Squash Australia chief executive Robert Donaghue said squash was a modern sport.

“It’s a sport that does suit the way people are playing sport now which is a short, sharp fitness-orientated sport where you get a decent workout,” Squash Australia chief executive Donaghue said.

“I know as part of the bid for the recent Olympic Games, the two current world champions said they would give up their six or seven world championships just to compete for an Olympic gold medal.”

Meanwhile, Australian netball great Liz Ellis says her sport shouldn’t be left out of consideration for the Olympics despite it being almost solely played in Commonwealth countries and having only a developing men’s component.

Ellis, who led a review of the sport last year, said netball had evolved significantly in the past 20 years with a broader array of countries in women’s international play and a men’s game which was among the fastest growing sports in Australia.

“The sport has to ensure it’s prepared to sing its own praises,” Ellis said.“Sometimes we are very humble but we should be out there shouting that we are developing netballers through Africa, there are plenty of international players in Super Netball and Super League in England.”

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No chance of Lang Park having either a retractable roof or temporary one so it could be divided for use as 2 "indoor" arenas like the Georgia Dome was used in Atlanta 1996? Yes, Brisbane could use a new arena, but this might solve their Aquatics Centre (main pool) problem, as well as add another option for one of the indoor team sports (most likely the site of Basketball, as that's the most popular).

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2 minutes ago, Lord David said:

No chance of Lang Park having either a retractable roof or temporary one so it could be divided for use as 2 "indoor" arenas like the Georgia Dome was used in Atlanta 1996? Yes, Brisbane could use a new arena, but this might solve their Aquatics Centre (main pool) problem, as well as add another option for one of the indoor team sports (most likely the site of Basketball, as that's the most popular).

Except it's needed for Rugby and Soccer?

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‘What a legend’: How Cathy Freeman helped put Qld in front

Credit: The Courier-Mail

Peter Gleeson

February 26, 2021 - 11:04AM

JUST a few weeks ago, Queensland’s 2032 Olympic bid chiefs – including premier Annastacia Palaszczuk – did a late night three-hour presentation to the International Olympic Committee.

Other countries such as Indonesia, India, Canada, China, Russia and Qatar did the same presentation, outlining why they should be the IOC’s choice as the preferred candidate for the 2032 Olympics.

Australia’s bid was already the front-runner.

According to those who saw the presentation, Queensland hit it out of the park. We nailed the narrative around our fiscal capability, economic and political stability, commitment to safety and security and putting the athletes first.

But there was one part of the presentation, orchestrated by Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates, that wowed the IOC decision-makers.

Her name was Cathy Freeman. You’ll remember her as the young Australian who took on the world at the Sydney 2000 Olympics and triumphed.

Her win in the 400m women’s final is still ranked as arguably the greatest moment in Australian sport. A nation held its breath for 49.77 seconds as she fulfilled her destiny after growing up in the Queensland sugar city of Mackay.

Who could ever forget Bruce McAvaney’s famous call. “This is a famous victory, a magnificent performance. What a legend. What a champion.’’

Freeman told the IOC selection panel that as a young Indigenous woman growing up in country Queensland she dreamed of Olympic gold.

She said Australia hosting the Olympics again in 2032 would breed a new generation of young, hopeful athletes.

She said sport was part of the “spirit of Australia’’ and as a sports-loving country the stands would be full and the participants would be celebrated. Her involvement was simply gold.

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10 minutes ago, ulu said:

Except it's needed for Rugby and Soccer?

There's other venues for that. You can have Rugby 7's at Robina Stadium in Gold Coast and Soccer could be held at the main stadium or Gabba. It's not needed, merely proposed.

Being used as an indoor venue is so much more versatile.

Edited by Lord David
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Just now, Lord David said:

There's other venues for that. You can have Rugby 7's at Robina Stadium in Gold Coast and Soccer could be held at the main stadium or Gabba.

 

The soccer final in a round stadium? Nope. If I remember right there's been plans to build the new entertainment arena (being used for swimming) for a long time anyway.

 

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22 minutes ago, ulu said:

 

The soccer final in a round stadium? Nope. If I remember right there's been plans to build the new entertainment arena (being used for swimming) for a long time anyway.

 

They held the 2000 Preliminaries there. Plus, Sydney used its Olympic Stadium while in its athletics configuration for Football finals. Brisbane could do the same.

By all means build the new arena, but not necessarily for use for Swimming. It could host Volleyball. Coomera Indoor Sports Centre now gets Basketball Preliminaries, maybe shared with the proposed Sunshine Coast Convention Centre.

Brisbane Indoor Sports Centre becomes redundant, with the proposed replacement for Chandler Arena still being offered for Gymnastics.

By the looks of it, the bid is proposing 3 new arenas to be built. Granted, one will be a much needed major world class arena, whilst the other 2 will be repurposed for multi-sports, it's still seems a tad unnecessary to have 3, when you only really need one.

A missed opportunity here.

Edited by Lord David
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Games for the People

Credit: The Courier-Mail

26 February, 2021

An opinion poll found overwhelming support among Queenslanders for our state hosting the 2032 Games  was a major factor that convinced the International Olympic Committee to consider now only our bid.

The IOC has been quietly running the ruler over Brisbane and Queensland for the past few months as it scutinised the region for the Olympics and Paralympics - and now it can be revealed in January it commissioned an opinion poll to test public support.

That poll found support in both Brisbane and the regions for the Games, with two-thirds in favour and slightly more than 1 in 10 opposed.

The previously confidential report considered by the IOC this week was also recommended due to our climate, that between 80 and 90 per cent of venues already existed or could be temporary - and that all three levels of government were signed up.

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59 minutes ago, Lord David said:


By the looks of it, the bid is proposing 3 new arenas to be built. Granted, one will be a much needed major world class arena, whilst the other 2 will be repurposed for multi-sports, it's still seems a tad unnecessary to have 3, when you only really need one.

A missed opportunity here.

 

 

i don't know if you are aware or not but Brisbane Live, the area being mooted for the swimming is not being paid for by taxpayers. it's a market led proposal paid for by AEG Ogden.

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53 minutes ago, Tejas57 said:

i don't know if you are aware or not but Brisbane Live, the area being mooted for the swimming is not being paid for by taxpayers. it's a market led proposal paid for by AEG Ogden.

The new arena would still come to use. However, by using Lang Park as two indoor venues, there would be no need to build to additional major arenas funded by taxpayers' money. A reatractable roof for the stadium would probably not come cheap either, but its long-term legacy is secured and the last renovation was two decades ago, so by 2032, some refurbishments works will probably be due, anyway.

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What would a Brisbane Olympics look like and what events will be held outside the capital city?

Credit:  ABC News Australia

By Jessica Stewart

Posted 26 February 2021 at 7:24am, updated 26 February 2021  at 8:35am

Brisbane is in the box seat to secure the 2032 Olympic Games after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) accepted recommendations to install South East Queensland as its preferred candidate.

A final decision is expected to be made as early as July, ahead of Tokyo 2021, and if Brisbane is selected, it will be the first Olympics Games to be hosted in Oceania in over 30 years.

Here's what the proposed Olympics will look like.

What will the Olympics be called?

Given this bid incorporates South East Queensland, as well as other parts of the state and even potentially other cities in Australia, just exactly what will this Olympics be referred to as — Brisbane 2032, South East Queensland 2032, Queensland 2032?

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said the state government was working through that at the moment with the IOC.

Where will the athletes stay?

According to the IOC's feasibility assessment for Brisbane, there will be two athletes' villages — one in Brisbane and one on the Gold Coast — as well as a day village on the Sunshine Coast.

Brisbane will build a new village, labelled as Queensland's "largest waterfront urban renewal project", at Albion and the riverside in the city's inner north, which would sleep up to 14,000 athletes.

The Gold Coast will contribute 2,000 beds with existing hotels in Surfers Paradise, as well as other hotels on the Gold Coast for team officials.

How many venues will there be?

In total, there'll be 31 venues, excluding preliminary final venues. Here's how they're broken down across the south-east:

  • Brisbane — 21 venues
  • Gold Coast — six venues
  • Sunshine Coast — three venues

Ms Palaszczuk said 85 per cent of these were existing venues.

"The Olympic committee are looking for existing structures," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"It's a new norm, which means it's a game changer — we don't have to build new stadiums that are not going to be used in the future."

Of the 31 venues, 19 are existing, but five of them will need permanent works, while five will be temporary and seven will be new sites.

Will any cities outside SEQ be involved?

The Whitsundays in north Queensland are being considered as the host venue for sailing, while several other regional boutique stadiums will be used for preliminary football matches.

Ipswich, Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast stadiums will all be used, while Toowoomba, Townsville and Cairns, as well as Sydney and Melbourne, are being considered as host venues.

Each venue will need to have a capacity of 20,000 spectators, so some stadiums will need upgrades, including Barlow Park in Cairns and Toowoomba Sports Ground.

The IOC has also recommended using the existing Sydney International Regatta Centre, which was built for the 2000 Olympics, as a venue for rowing or canoe (sprint).

The existing Penrith Whitewater Stadium in Sydney has also been proposed for the canoe (slalom) event.

"We want to make sure this is inclusive of Queensland and that we all have a part of history here," Ms Palaszczuk said.

Where will the opening and closing ceremonies be held?

There are several options for the opening and closing ceremonies, including a new Brisbane Olympic Stadium that could seat up to 50,000 people at the Albion Park Raceway in Brisbane's inner north.

However, the IOC has recommended considering the existing Carrara Stadium (40,000) on the Gold Coast for athletics events and using the Gabba in Brisbane for ceremonies (40,000).

Carrara Stadium is a proven facility after it was used for the 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games opening and closing ceremonies, as well as track and field events.

"We will be looking at all of those in detail now, but there is the option of one new big venue … but we may use Carrara as well," Ms Palaszczuk said.

"But let's have those discussions — we've not got to go down to the fine print."

Which facility will host swimming?

One of the Olympics biggest drawcards could be hosted in the heart of Brisbane city, with a new 15,000 capacity indoor arena being considered.

This site would be located at the Roma Street Parklands and would also host water polo.

But the IOC has flagged potentially using the existing outdoor Gold Coast Aquatic Centre, which seated up to 10,000 people during the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

What dates will the Olympics run?

  • Olympics — 23 July to 8 August 2032
  • Paralympics — 24 August to 5 September 2032

This is based on Queensland's climate and school holidays scheduling. 

If these dates are used, it would mean there's a 16-day break between the Olympics and Paralympics.

How much will the Olympics cost, and how much will the games benefit Queensland?

Nothing (essentially).

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) president John Coates said the operational costs of the 2032 Games would break even.

"The IOC on a budget of $4.5 billion (AUD), the IOC is putting in $2.5 billion … then you get approximately $1 billion from national sponsorship and $1 billion from the ticketing," Mr Coates said.

"That's enough then to pay for both the Olympics and Paralympic Games without any call on the state, or federal or local governments."

The state's 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Taskforce found the Games could create around 130,000 direct jobs and tens of thousands of indirect jobs, particularly in tourism.

In its Value Proposition Assessment, it estimated the economic benefits of the Games for Queensland at around $7.4 billion, with "social and community benefits" lasting potentially two decades.

What will it take for Brisbane to be confirmed as the host city?

Mr Coates said Queensland's handling of the COVID-19 crisis and the success of the 2018 Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast had both helped Brisbane's case.

He said targeted discussions and studies must take place before South East Queensland could be declared the sole candidate and the IOC membership votes.

"That will all be done by the end of April-early May, and that could go to a vote in Tokyo," Mr Coates said.

"If that is put to a vote — we need 50 per cent — I think I can get those numbers."

It is also the first time the International Olympic Committee has shown interest in a region, rather than a single city.

What events will each city host?

Brisbane:

  • Aquatics – Swimming, Water Polo, Diving, Artistic Swimming, Water Polo
  • Archery
  • Athletics/Ceremonies
  • Badminton
  • Basketball (Including 3x3)
  • Boxing
  • Canoe (Sprint/Slalom)
  • Cycling – Track, BMX Racing, BMX Freestyle
  • Equestrian (Including Cross Country)
  • Fencing
  • Football
  • Gymnastics
  • Handball
  • Hockey
  • Modern Pentathlon
  • Rowing
  • Rugby
  • Sailing Tennis
  • Shooting
  • Table Tennis
  • Taekwondo

Gold Coast:

  • Aquatics (Marathon)
  • Beach Volleyball
  • Golf
  • Judo
  • Triathlon
  • Volleyball
  • Weightlifting
  • Wrestling

Sunshine Coast:

  • Athletics (Race Walk)
  • Basketball
  • Cycling — Road Marathon, Mountain Bike
  • Sailing (Kiteboarding)

 

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Sorry if this has already been discussed, but why can't the Gabba host Athletics? Is its pitch that much smaller than those in Melbourne or Carrara? Google's Satellite images show a block to the west of the stadium that seems to be some outdated commercial buildings which, given they were to be torn down, should provide sufficient space for a training track, so that shouldn't be the issue.

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50 minutes ago, munichfan said:

Sorry if this has already been discussed, but why can't the Gabba host Athletics? Is its pitch that much smaller than those in Melbourne or Carrara? Google's Satellite images show a block to the west of the stadium that seems to be some outdated commercial buildings which, given they were to be torn down, should provide sufficient space for a training track, so that shouldn't be the issue.

It’s a good question as the Gabba has hosted Athletics in it’s distant past. That was many years ago and whether the dimensions of the current Gabba would meet current IAAF Athletics standards including long jump pits I do not know.

What is a telling factor was that the Gabba was not used for athletics in either of the Commonwealth Games in this region in 1982 nor 2018.

My understanding is that the main reason it’s crowd capacity is quite limited at around 35,000 for AFL football or cricket.

Land and space in the prime location region of the Gabba is at a premium, it is hemmed in all sides with no no room for expansion.  With the focus these days on affordable Games at a reduced cost I do not think they can afford to demolish buildings in this prime and expensive inner city real estate area to make way for an athletics warm-up track in 11 years time when there are better options.

Can anyone else shed some light on this?

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, munichfan said:

Sorry if this has already been discussed, but why can't the Gabba host Athletics? Is its pitch that much smaller than those in Melbourne or Carrara? Google's Satellite images show a block to the west of the stadium that seems to be some outdated commercial buildings which, given they were to be torn down, should provide sufficient space for a training track, so that shouldn't be the issue.

Accordingly to Wikipedia the Gabba's field is larger in both dimensions.

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12 hours ago, munichfan said:

The new arena would still come to use. However, by using Lang Park as two indoor venues, there would be no need to build to additional major arenas funded by taxpayers' money. A reatractable roof for the stadium would probably not come cheap either, but its long-term legacy is secured and the last renovation was two decades ago, so by 2032, some refurbishments works will probably be due, anyway.

It doesn't need to be a retractable roof (though it has been proven in various other stadiums in the past), it could be a temporary one. A legacy for Lang Park as it indeed could use a renovation come 2032.

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1 hour ago, AustralianFan said:

It’s a good question as the Gabba has hosted Athletics in it’s distant past. That was many years ago and whether the dimensions of the current Gabba would meet current IAAF Athletics standards including long jump pits I do not know.

What is a telling factor was that the Gabba was not used for athletics in either of the Commonwealth Games in this region in 1982 nor 2018.

My understanding is that the main reason it’s crowd capacity is quite limited at around 35,000 for AFL football or cricket.

Land and space in the prime location region of the Gabba is at a premium, it is hemmed in all sides with no no room for expansion.  With the focus these days on affordable Games at a reduced cost I do not think they can afford to demolish buildings in this prime and expensive inner city real estate area to make way for an athletics warm-up track in 11 years time when there are better options.

Can anyone else shed some light on this?

 

 

 

 

 

Why don't they just propose the same site a QEII Stadium, but build a new stadium on this site?

You place a new athletics track on an East-West axis, with the 50,000+ stands there. The new main grandstand will have a view of Brisbane's CBD. People would need to go there for Boxing at Nissan Arena anyways.

If they could move people back and forth in 1982, without the need for heavy rail, they can do it again.

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13 hours ago, Tejas57 said:

 

 

i don't know if you are aware or not but Brisbane Live, the area being mooted for the swimming is not being paid for by taxpayers. it's a market led proposal paid for by AEG Ogden.

But the organisers are still proposing 2 other "arenas". Are they really necessary?

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1 hour ago, Lord David said:

Why don't they just propose the same site a QEII Stadium, but build a new stadium on this site?

You place a new athletics track on an East-West axis, with the 50,000+ stands there. The new main grandstand will have a view of Brisbane's CBD. People would need to go there for Boxing at Nissan Arena anyways.

If they could move people back and forth in 1982, without the need for heavy rail, they can do it again.

Certainly an option and QSAC is in the plan as a venue but not for athletics.

Although the IOC is all about keeping costs down and using existing or temporary venues, not building new ones, such as using Carrara Stadium for athletics, the Queensland Government has existing plans for a train station at Albion on the existing suburban rail line.

The Premier has indicated this week that a new 50,000 Olympic Stadium is being considered. Albion has long been mooted as the likely site for this.

Should that occur, then moving large crowds by train to/from the Olympic Stadium at Albion via the new train station will be a lot more manageable and closer than via buses to/from QSAC.

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From back in March 25, 2018:

Albion Station TOD Precinct Redevelopment Agreement Signed

Credit: Brisbane Development

A $750 million development that was part of a Palaszczuk Government election commitment is set to transform the precinct surrounding Albion train station.

Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said an agreement had been signed with Brisbane property developers, Geon Property, to revitalise the Albion site through a Transit Oriented Development (TOD).

“During the election campaign, we committed to investing in a multimillion-dollar accessibility upgrade at this station and we will now work with the developer to ensure it integrates with their plans for the precinct.

“This fifteen-year project will integrate Albion train station with, nearby commercial and residential buildings and vacant land to deliver an exciting community asset.

By unlocking the potential of the 3.5-hectare site through a partnership with the private sector we will deliver enhanced public transport infrastructure for the local community.”

According to Geon Property, the proposed transit orientated development aims to contribute to the revitalisation of Albion, and will position the site as a community hub that provides new residential accommodation, office space, dining and shopping facilities, including $28.7m of upgraded transport facilities and public access to the Albion train station.

The proposed improvements would complement planning currently underway by Queensland Rail for an upcoming accessibility upgrade of Albion train station which could include new platform access with lifts, raised platform sections for improved access and other accessibility features such as hearing aid loop, signage and tactile flooring surfaces.

“Construction on the accessibility upgrade is also expected to start in late 2019,” Mr Bailey said.

Geon Property is currently working on design options to be submitted to Brisbane City Council as part of standard development application processes.

Designs put forward will endeavour to respect Albion’s surrounds and support State Government planning objectives for transit-oriented developments including:

  • Improved accessibility to the train station
  • A mix of residential, retail, commercial and community uses
  • High-quality public spaces and streets, which are pedestrian and cyclist friendly

Geon Property will commence a program of community engagement on the project shortly.

The group will start a detailed design, development application and approval process over the next 12 to 18 months.

Mr Bailey said construction was expected to start in 2019-20 and more information would be available as development applications and approvals proceeded.

Also included as part of the precinct redevelopment:

  • Design and construct a mixed-use TOD integrated with Albion Train Station and the wider area
  • Work with the state to design improved Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cth) compliant access to Albion Train Station and construct
  • Work with the state to optimise the design and location of commuter car parking (to ensure no net loss of park’n’ride numbers) and undertake construction of the necessary works
  • Integrate with a section of North Brisbane Bikeway through the precinct

Geon Property Managing Director Ben Griffin said the TOD offered a unique opportunity to revitalise Albion.

“Redeveloping Albion train station allows us to deliver a truly world-class transit oriented development,” Mr Griffin said.

“This project will be more than just a property development – our vision is to create a precinct that is a genuine destination.

“This project will be defined by a seamless integration of high-quality apartment living, retail, food and beverage outlets with genuine character, modern commercial offerings and vibrant public open spaces.

“It will offer access to Brisbane’s transport networks, integrating with one of South East Queensland’s busiest train lines, connecting to the bikeway network and providing accessible parking options.”

This isn’t the first TOD proposal for the Albion site. In 2012, FKP had plans for what was known as ‘Albion Mill’ and comprised of a mixed-use retail and apartment precinct surrounding a four-storey heritage building which was Brisbane’s sole working flour mill for 72 years.

However, in November 2013, the heritage building was gutted by fire and subsequently demolished after council engineers deemed it too unsafe to remain standing.

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