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2 hours ago, Gonzo said:

Can be easily done

Brisbane - host outdoor events

Sydney & Melbourne - host indoor events

Mate, apart from the fine details to be ironed out, this is a done deal.

You’re acting as if the 2032 Queensland Bid is just starting and is still a ‘thought bubble’ in someone’s head.

It’s almost finished apart from the fine detailed.

It started six years ago in 2015.

>> Go back over the previous pages in this thread and you will catch up with what’s happened over the last 6 years.

The IOC made a major announcement to the world today that targeted dialogue will start now with Brisbane 2032.

Sydney or Melbourne have not been involved or mentioned in this advanced Bid at all.

They have never been involved in this Bid, apart from Penrith for rowing etc, and it’s far far too late now anyway.

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Sorry George_D, I should have clarified. At Athens 2004,  there was 2 outside permanent pools, one 50m  for the swimming competition and one permanent 25m pool in an area between the swimming pool and

https://stillmedab.olympic.org/media/Document%20Library/OlympicOrg/News/2021/02/IOC-Feasibility-Assessment-Brisbane.pdf  Venues BRISBANE Brisbane Olympic Stadium- 50,000 (Athletics, Tra

Thank goodness, these decisions are not made based on blogging comments on  whatever media platform. Three indicators show clearly that a majority of Queenslanders support the Olympics coming to

Brisbane declared ‘preferred host’ for 2032 Olympics, but which stadiums could feature?

 Credit:  Austadiums

Thursday 25th February 2021

The IOC has designated Brisbane as the “preferred candidate city” to host the 2032 Summer Olympic Games, with the city’s mayor saying up to 90 per cent of the venues would be temporary or existing.

The news was delivered by International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach during a press conference in Switzerland on Wednesday morning (Australian time).

"We have unanimously after a very intense discussion approved this recommendation," Mr Bach said.

"The commission based on this decision will start more detailed discussions with the Brisbane 2032 committee and the Australian Olympic Committee about their potential to host the Olympic Games 2032."

If the discussions are successful and Brisbane meets the requirements, then the Queensland capital will become the third Australian city to host the Olympic Games, after Melbourne in 1956 and Sydney in 2000.

The bid extends beyond Brisbane, with South-East Queensland to host the Games, seeing regions including the Gold Coast, which successfully hosted the 2018 Commonwealth Games, and the Sunshine Coast, set to be part of the action.

While it was revealed in September 2019 a new world-class 80,000-seat Brisbane stadium would be built as part of the city’s Olympic bid, it remains to be seen if that’ll eventuate, with official details on potential venues not revealed at this point.

The days of building future white elephants for Olympic Games are over. While Sydney’s stadium legacy has largely been given a green tick, other cities have failed the test, with numerous venues in Athens, Rio de Janeiro and even Beijing laying abandoned, left in ruins, in the years following their respective Games’.

Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner explained that under the IOC's new norm, there's a greater ability to use existing venues to keep costs down.

“There's also the opportunity to use temporary venues as well, we'll be taking advantage of that.

“So, we have 85 to 90 per cent of the venues that are either existing venues, or the ability to have temporary venues.”

South East Queensland will instead focus on fast-tracking big ticket infrastructure items such as transport.

Previously identified sites for a new stadium include the RNA Showgrounds, QSAC at Nathan, the Mayne Rodd Rail Yards at Bowen Hills and Albion Park.

The Gabba in its existing form is considered too small to serve as the main stadium, with a capacity of 42,000, however expansion may be an option. Transport links to the venue will improve in future years, with the opening of the Cross River Rail project, which includes an underground station adjacent to the Gabba.

Other venues including Suncorp Stadium, the Queensland Tennis CentreNissan Arena and the Sleeman Sports Complex are likely to feature in the final bid.

VIEW A LIST OF BRISBANE’S STADIUMS >

The Olympics would revitalise the city’s stadium infrastructure, with existing venues including the Brisbane Aquatic CentreBrisbane Entertainment Centre & Queensland Sport and Athletic Centre (main stadium of the 1982 Commonwealth Games) considered dated facilities, requiring significant redevelopments to bring them up to standard, or completely new venues to replace them.

A host of venues on the Gold Coast used for the recent Commonwealth Games, including Metricon Stadium and Cbus Super Stadium, are set to form part of the bid, while it should also boost Sunshine Coast Stadium’s hopes of proceeding with its redevelopment, after it recently missed out on federal funding.

Being named preferred candidate gives Brisbane exclusive access to convince the IOC without competition from other cities and countries, including Doha, Istanbul, Germany, China and Indonesia, who have all signalled their hunger for the 2032 event.

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Sydney Olympics venues could be used in 2032 as part of cut-price Brisbane Games

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Adam Pengilly
February 25, 2021 — 4.44pm

As few as two new sporting venues would be built in Queensland under a plan to use legacy facilities from Sydney 2000 as Brisbane bid organisers insist they can host an Olympic Games that breaks even, avoiding a splurge on potentially expensive white elephants.

An International Olympic Committee technical assessment into the preferred Brisbane bid for the Olympic Games in 2032 claims approximately 80 per cent of the venues are already in place throughout south-east Queensland.

Brisbane’s bid document pitched seven new facilities being built, predominantly for marquee events such as athletics and swimming. A new 50,000-seat Brisbane Olympic Stadium at Albion was also proposed. But in the feasibility document released on Thursday, the IOC said it was open to using existing athletics facilities at Carrara on the Gold Coast – which hosted the Commonwealth Games in 2018 – and the Gabba or Suncorp Stadium for the opening and closing ceremonies if the construction of Brisbane Olympic Stadium does not proceed.

After criticism of the cost and underutilisation of expensive venues from recent Olympic Games – most notably Athens in 2004 and Rio in 2016 – Olympic officials are embarking on a “new norm” where host cities will already have the majority of sporting infrastructure in place.

To that end, Brisbane fits the bill after it was named on Thursday morning (AEDT) the IOC’s preferred bidder for the 2032 event.

 

“We already have 85 per cent of the venues at the moment,” Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said. “It’s a new norm, which means it’s a game changer.

“We don’t have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future. And this gives us hope and opportunity as we go through our economic recovery and plan for the future.”

The Games budget has been set at $4.45 billion with projected revenues from broadcast rights, sponsorship and ticket sales expected to make it a cost neutral event, no doubt helped by the fact the majority of venues already exist.

“We don’t have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future.”

Annastacia Palaszczuk

An agreement is expected in the first half of this year about whether a new aquatics centre will be built in the river city, boasting a capacity of 15,000 and housing the swimming and water polo competitions. But the IOC has also stressed the bid will consider switching those events to the Gold Coast Aquatic Centre at Southport.

Basketball and gymnastics would be the only sports guaranteed to be played in purpose-built venues not already in existence.

The Brisbane master plan even allows for canoe slalom and sprint as well as rowing to be held at the same facilities that were used during Sydney 2000, the last time Oceania hosted an Olympic Games, if a whitewater and flat water canoe/kayak centre is not built in the sunshine state.

Rugby’s traditional home in Queensland, Ballymore, would be transformed into a 15,000-capacity host for hockey.

The IOC’s technical assessment has allowed for three clusters, Brisbane, Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast with a 14,000-bed Olympic village to be constructed in Brisbane and 2000 existing beds to be set aside in hotels at Surfers Paradise.

Golf would be played at Royal Pines on the Gold Coast, which would also host beach volleyball at Broadbeach, indoor volleyball preliminaries, weightlifting, triathlon and open-water swimming.

The marathon, road cycling, mountain biking and sailing would all be held on the streets and in the waters of the Sunshine Coast, while football preliminary matches would be dotted down the eastern seaboard from Cairns and Townsville in north Queensland to Sydney and Melbourne.

An IOC poll found 66 per cent of Australians were in favour of making Brisbane the third Australian city to host an Olympic Games after Sydney and Melbourne (1956).

It is forecast a Brisbane Games would provide $7.4 billion in economic benefits and create 130,000 direct jobs.

The IOC is expected to escalate discussions with Brisbane bid officials in coming months after the recommendation of the Future Hosts Commission.

“After many years of hard work from the SEQ [south-east Queensland] mayors, it’s amazing to hear the International Olympic Committee acknowledges south east Queensland has what it takes to host an Olympic and Paralympic Games,” Brisbane Lord Mayor Adrian Schrinner said.

“When we started this journey almost six years ago to the day, many people were sceptical. Now we’re one step away from being named as the host of the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

“Today is not the time however to get overexcited, there is still plenty of work to be done.”

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20 hours ago, Tejas57 said:

It is the responsibility of the Executive Board to put forward one or more preferred hosts for election at the IOC Session. Meaning that the IOC Membership will continue to be the final decision-makers on future hosts of the Olympic Games.

According to yesterday’s GB’s article, that’s not the case (at least the part of the full IOC membership voting. Doesn’t look like they are). This is a snippet from that article: 

“The new Olympic bid process eliminated strict deadlines, open evaluations and shortlists to instead put the decision making in the hands of the few members of the Future Host Commissions and the IOC Executive Board.“

It also mentioned that the other 2032 interested cities “will now be ‘forced to refocus’ on a Games further in the future”. So it seems that this is pretty much a done deal, unless like the article also stated, negotiations with Australia fizzle out for some reason or another. 

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Lord mayor says Olympics are Brisbane’s ‘best opportunity in generations’

Credit:  Brisbane Times
By Lydia Lynch
February 25, 2021 — 10.26am

The chance to host the 2032 Olympic Games is the “best opportunity that our city, our region and our state has had in generations”, Brisbane lord mayor Adrian Schrinner says.

Cr Schrinner said the state was “now in the box seat” after the International Olympic Committee confirmed it would deal exclusively with Queensland on its bid to host the Games.

“Look, it might be a miserable day there in terms of the weather, but it is a beautiful Brisbane day, a beautiful Queensland day today and there’s so much to be excited about today,” he said.

“This here is the best opportunity that our city, our region and our state has had in generations. We can’t let this go to waste.”

Queensland organisers and the Australian Olympic Committee were expected to finalise planning details required by the IOC as early as by the end of May.

If all conditions are met, Australia will in just over a decade host its third Olympics, with a final call to be made as early as July, before the delayed Tokyo Olympics.

AOC president John Coates said all other cities that had shown interest in hosting the 2032 Olympics had their bids “parked for a future Games”.

“The IOC will now deal exclusively with us,” he said.

“There has to be a vote, even if there is only one candidate, and you have to get 50 per cent plus one.

“I think I can get those numbers.”

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said she would “ensure that we get the funding to make this a reality”.

She said the state already had 85 per cent of venues needed for the Games.

“We don’t have to build huge stadiums that are not going to be used in the future and this gives us hope and opportunity as we go through our economic recovery and plan for the future.

“We can actually give hope to our young students right across the nation that they could compete in an Olympics here in Queensland in 2032.”

Ms Palaszczuk said there had been no decision yet whether the Games would be “Brisbane 2032” or “Queensland 2032″.

“All of the state will share in an Olympic glory. We want to make sure that this is inclusive of Queensland and that we all have a part of history here,” she said.

“And look, to have Queensland and Brisbane firmly on the international map, I think what that will do for our tourism in the future, especially when the international borders by 2032 will definitely be open by then.

“We have to now go down to the fine print and make sure that we’ve got all the funding lined up between all levels of government.”

Mr Coates said the Games would have an operating cost of $4.5 billion and would break even after IOC funding ($2.5 billion), sponsorships ($1 billion) and ticketing ($1 billion).

- with Phil Lutton

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8 hours ago, Gonzo said:

Laughable that this place will become an Olympic host ... scraping the bottom of the barrel is the IOC

It looks like it’s a matter of what the IOC is interested in most these days: stability. Much like what Tokyo was suppose to be for 2020.

I mean, it’s not like the other 2032 potential interested parties were anything near exciting or reliable. It’s not like the IOC is all that interested in running back to China anytime soon after 2022 (& 2008 for that matter). And India? Doha? Seoul/Pyeongyang? Sinking, over congested & polluted Jakarta? Erdogan’s Istanbul? Orban’s Budapest? I’m sure the IOC is not interested in touching any of those with a 10-foot pole. 

And I just read that Germany abandoned it’s proposal just last month (which probably would’ve ended in a referendum anyway, as it seems par for the course there with Olympic bids). So that doesn’t really leave the IOC much to lust after, other than maybe the Netherlands (which again, see Germany). 

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11 hours ago, Sir Rols said:

Brisbane is exactly the sort of city that could get a lot out of the games. Indeed, might even need something like the games in order to make the next step up. No, it’s certainly not a “great” city. Not even, IMO, a particularly nice city. But it’s always been aspirational, and the SE Queensland region as a whole is sure enough pretty pleasant. An Olympics is exactly the kind of thing it needs to grow out of its mediocre, big country town reputation.

Didn’t do that for Atlanta. I think if you were to ask any random stranger nowadays what is Atlanta most famous for, the 1996 Olympics, I doubt would even be on the radar.

And Brisbane is the size of San Antonio. So I really am going to be curious when/if all the big Olympic construction/preparations & infrastructure upgrades get all under way, how all of that will be “agenda 2020 friendly” & how it will all be ‘good’ for everyone involved.
 

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11 minutes ago, ulu said:

That same GB’s article also said this:

“A project from Germany dropped out of the running last month, according to Kloster Aasen.”

And which, also going by the article you linked, it’s no surprise why the German bid wasn’t advance, since it stated that the German Olympic Committee ‘refused’ to enter into negotiations with the IOC.
 

If there’s no NOC support, then there’s also, in effect, no bid. Much to Mronz ‘disappointment’. 

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21 minutes ago, FYI said:

And Brisbane is the size of San Antonio. So I really am going to be curious when/if all the big Olympic construction/preparations & infrastructure upgrades get all under way, how all of that will be “agenda 2020 friendly” & how it will all be ‘good’ for everyone involved.
 

80-90% of venues exist already. What big Olympic construction & infrastructure upgrades did you have in mind ?

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1 hour ago, FYI said:

According to yesterday’s GB’s article, that’s not the case (at least the part of the full IOC membership voting. Doesn’t look like they are). This is a snippet from that article: 

“The new Olympic bid process eliminated strict deadlines, open evaluations and shortlists to instead put the decision making in the hands of the few members of the Future Host Commissions and the IOC Executive Board.“

It also mentioned that the other 2032 interested cities “will now be ‘forced to refocus’ on a Games further in the future”. So it seems that this is pretty much a done deal, unless like the article also stated, negotiations with Australia fizzle out for some reason or another. 

John Coates said in this tv interview this morning that it still needs to go to a full vote of the IOC members session

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43 minutes ago, AustralianFan said:

80-90% of venues exist already. What big Olympic construction & infrastructure upgrades did you have in mind ?

theres already a ton of infrastructure going in anyway - Cross River Rail, Brisbane Metro, Queens Wharf for starters. This is stuff we already need and was being done. The good thing about my city hosting the games is that we will have a hard deadline to get things done and will hopefully stop the bunfights between city, state and federal governments 

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Olympics 2032: We're closing in on gold after Brisbane named 'preferred bidder'

Credit:  Sunshine Coast News

Peter Hall and AAP / 25 FEBRUARY 2021

The Olympic Games are likely to return to Australia in 2032 after Brisbane was installed as the “preferred bidder” in a decision that is set to put the Sunshine Coast on the world stage and fast-track vital transport infrastructure.

International Olympic Committee (IOC) president Thomas Bach told a news conference overnight that the decision “was not a decision against anybody”.

“This is just a decision in favour of one interested party at this moment in time,” he said.

Preferred status means the IOC will negotiate exclusively with the Australian bid.

Brisbane, if negotiations conclude successfully and approval is granted by an IOC Session, would be the third Australian city to host the Games after Melbourne had the honour in 1956 and Sydney in 2000.

That would effectively end the hopes of other bidders, such as Rhine-Ruhr, Doha, Budapest, Jakarta, New Delhi, Istanbul, St Petersburg and the Chinese cities of Chengdu and Chongqing.

In February 2020, the Queensland Government said the 2032 Games could be held over three venue ‘hubs’ – Brisbane, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast.

Other regional locations would be considered, including football venues in Toowoomba, Townsville and Cairns.

Sunshine Coast Council Mayor Mark Jamieson has played a leading role in advancing the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games candidature since the idea was first mooted by the Council of Mayors South East Queensland nearly six years ago.

Mayor Jamieson said he was delighted with the announcement overnight by the International Olympic Committee of the preferred host for the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

In April 2015, he and then Lord Mayor Graham Quirk were the  first government representatives to meet with IOC President Thomas Bach to discuss the potential to host the Games in South East Queensland.

Mayor Jamieson said it had been a rollercoaster journey to get to this point, but we were not over the line yet.

“When IOC President Bach and Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates met with Graham Quirk and myself as the delegates of the Council of Mayors (SEQ) in Sydney, he was incredibly impressed with the SEQ story and the power of Mayors and councils working together for the advancement of their communities,” he said.

“Bringing the Federal and State Governments to the table in 2019 has only served to add to our momentum and the inherent value of what can be realised when the three tiers of government work together productively is what has helped achieve the milestone we have reached today.

“As we now push our way through the economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, the potential to host the 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games can become a powerful tool in South East Queensland’s economic resurgence and deliver an incredible boost to our tourism industry when it needs it the most – along with many other industries that will be important contributors to the Games supply chain.”

The Council of Mayors’ proposal secured the support of the Commonwealth Government, with an assessment concluding the Games could generate 130,000 jobs and deliver up to $8.6 billion in new trade opportunities among other benefits.

A report was released in 2019 which showed an Olympic and Paralympic Games in South East Queensland was “feasible and likely to generate significant opportunity for substantial economic and community benefits”.

Bach outlined why Brisbane was chosen as a preferred bidder.

He said the city proposed “sustainable Games in line with the region’s long-term strategy and using primarily existing and temporary venues”.

“The commitment of Australia and Oceania to Olympic sports has grown remarkably since the fantastic Olympic Games Sydney 2000. This is why we see such strong public support.

“We decided to seize an opportunity to take to the next stage our discussions about returning 32 years later.

“In this way, we are also acknowledging the strength of the Australian team and other athletes from across the continent of Oceania at the Olympic Games over the past decades.”

The IOC developed the preferred bidder system in 2019 to prevent potential hosts spending large amounts of money over several years only to fall short.

“We are delighted the IOC Executive Board agreed with the Commission’s recommendation to invite Brisbane 2032 to targeted dialogue,” said Kristin Kloster Aasen, chair of the Future Host Commission.

“The IOC EB and the Commission noted the excellent progress that it has made, the strength of its proposition and the strategic opportunities it affords to the Olympic Movement.”

Tokyo hosts the 2020 Games, delayed until later this year because of the coronavirus, while Paris has the 2024 Games and Los Angeles the 2028 edition.

 

 

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Olympics: Queensland may build new stadium if 2032 bid successful - official

Sports News

Ian Ransom
 
Credit:  Reuters

MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia may build a new stadium to host the opening and closing ceremonies of the 2032 Olympics if Brisbane secures the Games, Queensland state Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said on Thursday.

Brisbane took a major step towards being named 2032 hosts after the International Olympic Committee said the city had been picked as the preferred partner to start talks for the Games.

“There is the option of one new big venue in terms of where we would have the opening ceremony ... but we may use Carrara as well,” Palaszczuk told reporters in Brisbane.

Carrara Stadium on the Gold Coast, south of Brisbane, was used to host the opening and closing ceremonies and the athletics events at the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Australian Olympic Committee President John Coates said the bid had earmarked 25,000-seat Carrara for the track and field events in 2032 but added that venues needed to be finalised.

Brisbane already has two major inner city stadiums -- the 42,000-seat Brisbane Cricket Ground, known as the “Gabba”, and the 52,500-capacity Lang Park.

The Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast north of Brisbane have been earmarked as event and village hubs.

Some soccer fixtures might be held in other regions of Queensland, Palaszczuk said.

Officials said 85% of venues needed to host the Games were already in place but they would need to fund improvements in transport infrastructure over the next 11 years.

Coates said the local, state and federal governments needed to be “at one” in terms of funding in order to host the Games “properly” across southeast Queensland.

“The future infrastructure and transport -- in particular, rail and road,” he said.

Coates, also a vice-president of the International Olympic Committee, played a key role in Sydney’s successful bid for the 2000 Olympics.

He said the Brisbane bid could be endorsed in an IOC vote before the start of the July 23-Aug. 8 Tokyo Games.

“It will go to a vote and we’ve got to get 50% plus one -- I’ll be able to get those numbers,” said the 70-year-old.

Reporting by Ian Ransom; Editing by Peter Rutherford

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The thing about the Olympics, though, is that they are much more than just about the ‘existing venues’.  But they are also about ‘cost overruns’, especially when you’re building “a ton of infrastructure that’s needed anyway”, that you have to get all done & built by those ‘hard deadlines’ because of the Olympics. And you’ll definitely have the people that are going to be pointing about all the excessive spending in relation to the Olympics, whether it’s warranted or not. And here you already have talk about a possible new stadium for the opening & closing ceremonies? Well, that’s how the overspending will start to get going then.

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3 minutes ago, FYI said:

The thing about the Olympics, though, is that they are much more than just about the ‘existing venues’.  But they are also about ‘cost overruns’, especially when you’re building “a ton of infrastructure that’s needed anyway”, that you have to get all done & built by those ‘hard deadlines’ because of the Olympics. And you’ll definitely have the people that are going to be pointing about all the excessive spending in relation to the Olympics, whether it’s warranted or not. And here you already have talk about a possible new stadium for the opening & closing ceremonies? Well, that’s how the overspending will start to get going then.

Eleven years is a long time for those hard deadlines and certainly more time than past Olympics have had. And you're making it seem like the stadium is an afterthought when it's included in the games costing.

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As I said, it’ll be the perception of some of the local people that will be making all sorts of noises about overspending, that’s why I said ‘warranted or not’. Another poster posted a youtube video where Coates was speaking. In the comment section, there’s already more negative posts than positive ones at the cost. Even Los Angeles, which is arguably the most Olympic-ready city there is, is spending more than a Billion dollars on upgrades & a couple of new facilities. And they were also awarded 2028 eleven years out.
 

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18 minutes ago, FYI said:

. Another poster posted a youtube video where Coates was speaking. In the comment section, there’s already more negative posts than positive ones at the cost.

the same debates and comments were made before the sydney games as well.. and if i go back and look at the newspapers i have no doubt i'd find letters satying the same about melbourne. it's just a noisy minority and i bet a few of them will be scrambling for tickets when the time comes

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And it’s those noisy minorities that have derailed bids all over Europe (& even the U.S.) as of late, & why not very many other cities from Democratic countries are coming out to bid. The citizens are starting to take notice that the Olympics are no longer all that they’re cracked up to be for the Host City. Take Germany, for example, not wanting to play footsie with the IOC time & again.

I don’t think that we can compare the (IOC) times now as they were back then. Just look at the “streamlined” bidding process that the IOC has taken precisely because times are different now. Gone are the days of the high-caliber Olympic bid races of yesteryear, where bid cities clawed their way to vote day.

The IOC ‘claims’ that they changed the process to “save the losing cities from wasting money & saving them heartache”. Yeah, right. They’d jump right back in to the way things were if they could! But virtually everyone else these days, is saying thanks, but no thanks. 

 

 

 

 

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Hamilton shores up for 14,000-bed Olympic Games athletes village

Credit: Brisbane Times

By Tony Moore
February 25, 2021 — 10.00pm

Hamilton is firming to host a 14,000-bed athletes village for a Brisbane-based 2032 Olympic Games.

The site, six kilometres from the Brisbane CBD, was identified in the International Olympics Committee documents released on Wednesday night when the IOC announced the Brisbane bid would have preferred status.

Like the athletes village developed at Carrara on the Gold Coast for the 2018 Commonwealth Games, the Hamilton athletes village could be repurposed after the Games as a mix of private and public housing.

Brisbane City Council recently finished a $650 million upgrade to Kingsford Smith Drive, increasing connectivity to the site, and it is near the dual Gateway Bridges, providing easy links to Gold and Sunshine coast venues.

It is also close to the proposed new Brisbane Olympic Stadium at Albion.

 

A second 2000-bed Games village is proposed for the Gold Coast, while a 600-bed athletes day village has been put forward for Maroochydore Central on the Sunshine Coast.

The main stadium, proposed for the Albion Park Raceway site, or the 40,000-seat Gabba, which might be redeveloped by 2032, are suggested as possible venues for the opening and closing ceremonies.

Brisbane has 14 sports venues, the Gold Coast has seven and the Sunshine Coast five under consideration as part of the Olympic bid.

The Queensland government has long identified Hamilton Northshore as a Priority Development Area.

The suburb includes 50 hectares of Queensland government-owned riverfront land.

A spokesman for Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk confirmed the site was “certainly part of the planning”.

“All three levels of government now have to get involved to determine the final solution,” he said.

Lord mayor Adrian Schrinner said Brisbane’s preferred bid status was “the best opportunity that our city, our region and our state has had in generations”.

“We can’t let this go to waste,” he said.

Cr Schrinner has called on all levels of government to co-ordinate a decade-long investment boom in south-east Queensland, including the new billion-dollar City Deal, as the Olympic bid progressed.

Sunshine Coast MP Ted O’Brien, who is Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s representative on the Olympic bid leadership group with Ms Palaszczuk and Cr Schrinner, said the bid documents should give the public confidence in the “mammoth amount of work” done so far.

“But the detailed planning process has not yet started,” Mr O’Brien said.

“A lot of other options are still under assessment and we will give them a thorough due diligence to get them right.”

Brisbane hosted the 1982 Commonwealth Games and the Gold Coast hosted the 2018 Commonwealth Games.

Brisbane also hosted the privately-owned 2001 Goodwill Games run by media magnate Ted Turner, attracting 1300 athletes in 14 sporting competitions.

 

2032 Olympic Games: Where the sports may be contested

Brisbane 

  • Lang Park - football and rugby
  • Ballymore Stadium - hockey
  • Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre - table tennis, fencing, taekwondo and badminton
  • Brisbane Showgrounds - equestrian
  • Victoria Park -  BMX freestyle,  cross country
  • Brisbane Live arena (Roma Street) - swimming and water polo
  • Brisbane Olympic Stadium at Albion - opening ceremony, athletics, basketball
  • South Bank forecourt - archery
  • South Bank piazza - basketball 
  • New Brisbane indoor sports venue - basketball
  • Anna Meares Velodrome, Chandler - track cycling and BMX racing
  • Chandler Sports Centre - gymnastics
  • The Gabba - suggested alternative for opening and closing ceremonies.
  • Queensland Tennis Centre - tennis
  • New Larapinta venue - canoeing

Ipswich 

  • Ipswich Stadium - pentathlon

Redland

  • Proposed whitewater centre for canoeing

Gold Coast

  • Coomera Indoor Sports Centre - volleyball
  • Broadwater Parklands - triathlon, aquatics
  • Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre - volleyball, weightlifting
  • Gold Coast Aquatic Centre - swimming
  • Royal Pines Resort - golf

Sunshine Coast

  • Alexandra Headland -  road cycling, marathon, walk racing, sailing, kiteboarding
  • Sunshine Coast Stadium - football
  • Sunshine Coast Convention Centre - basketball

Athletics was then held at the Queensland Sports and Athletics Centre, then known as ANZ Stadium, with gymnastics at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.

The Olympics have previously been held in Australia at Sydney in 2000 and Melbourne in 1956.

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Surely a new big circular stadium in Brisbane could get use though? Between AFL and cricket, there's none of the difficult "ooh, the games are over, what do we do with this thing now" that's the big problem with the athletics stadium for most Olympics. I've often been surprised by how small the Gabba looks compared to Melbourne, Adelaide and now Perth - just think of the yips you could give our bowlers with 80k in for day 1 of the Ashes :P

 

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5 hours ago, yoshi said:

Surely a new big circular stadium in Brisbane could get use though? Between AFL and cricket, there's none of the difficult "ooh, the games are over, what do we do with this thing now" that's the big problem with the athletics stadium for most Olympics. I've often been surprised by how small the Gabba looks compared to Melbourne, Adelaide and now Perth - just think of the yips you could give our bowlers with 80k in for day 1 of the Ashes :P

 

Yes that would be incredible and may well happen.  Albion seems to be the preferred site if the new stadium option went ahead.

John Coates said in a media interview yesterday that the athletics competition could be held at Carrara Stadium and the Opening/Closing Ceremonies at Lang Park.

I suspect we won’t have to wait long for an answer to these questions.

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Secret meeting that won Australia frontrunner status to host Olympics 

Credit:  Sydney Morning Herald

By Phil Lutton

FEBRUARY 26, 2021

 

In June 2019, Prime Minister Scott Morrison travelled to Japan to meet with world leaders at the G20 summit in Osaka. His agenda featured discussions about free trade, getting extremist content off Facebook and YouTube as well as dinner with then US president Donald Trump.

But Morrison also found time for a quiet meeting with Olympic powerbrokers. It was an encounter that would prove vital to Australia’s charge towards hosting a third Olympic Games in Brisbane in 2032. In Japan at the time was Thomas Bach, the president of the International Olympic Committee, and John Coates, the IOC vice-president and president of the Australian Olympic Committee.

Their discussions established the seriousness of the Queensland bid, which has just been given “preferred candidate” status by the IOC including exclusive negotiating rights. In order for Bach to be convinced Brisbane had the full backing of the government, he needed to hear it from the Prime Minister himself. Morrison, a former Tourism Australia boss whose penchant for marketing divides opinions, sold the dream hard.

Coates is left-leaning when it comes to his politics. But he told friends after the meeting he had “never been more proud of my prime minister”.

Bach was left with the distinct impression that the Queensland bid carried the heft of the nation’s coffers from the top down. He was also assured vital infrastructure projects, such as major upgrades to the choked highways north and south of Brisbane, would be delivered on time.

Barring a complete breakdown between the various levels of government, all of whom have enthusiastically backed the proposal, the Queensland games are what Coates – who loves a punt on the horses – might regard as a good thing. The Olympics are coming back to our shores.

Given the uncertainty around the Tokyo Games, which will now go ahead in July in a reduced format, it was exactly the kind of news Bach wanted to hear as the IOC prepared to add to an Olympic roster that already boasted Paris in 2024 and Los Angeles in 2028.

After a largely chaotic Games in Rio, which left the city broke and with a litany of crumbling, purpose-built stadia, the IOC had little inclination for more adventures outside of proven grounds. With Sydney one of the best Games in history and the Gold Coast hosting an excellent Commonwealth Games in 2018, Australia once again surfaced as an exceedingly safe bet for a major event.

The trio of Bach, Coates and Morrison would rendezvous again in November 2020, this time behind closed doors when Morrison made another trip to Tokyo, this time to meet the nation’s new Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga. The seeds were well and truly sprouting by then and Morrison later spoke of the benefit he felt a home Olympics would provide for all levels of sport.

Coates told the Herald and The Age on Thursday that Morrison said, “I know the good the Olympics do for sport. This is also an opportunity for the Australian government to stimulate sport again at all levels. It might also get Alan Jones and John Coates off my back about funding for sport.”

Given the relatively cheap price tag for the bid, less than $10 million, it would represent a high-percentage play no matter what the result.

The pace at which the bid has progressed has left many observers stunned. While some rival contenders were still sharpening their pencils, the Brisbane team was putting its signature on a deeply impressive final product. The Budapest bid only formed a committee to look into the feasibility of hosting the Games in late January, while Brisbane’s was completed and made public in February 2019.

Why were the other bidders, which included Doha and a regional bid from Germany, left so flat-footed? Bach was in Australia in May 2019 practically urging Australian governments to throw the project over the line, while the carefully assembled pitch to the Future Hosts Commission ticked almost every box, from the use of existing venues to sustainability and legacy infrastructure.

Coates was challenged as the president of the AOC in 2017 but it’s doubtful if the bid would have tasted success if it wasn’t for his influence. Both he and Bach are officially at arm’s length from the process but Coates knows the value of details and how to navigate a bidding process he helped bring into life as the IOC made changes to the tender process in 2019. One source close to the bid said the south-east Queensland team had “played a blinder”. When representatives met with the Future Host Commission via Zoom on February 8, it was Olympic gold medallist Cathy Freeman who would deliver the Welcome to Country.

Freeman is not just a sporting giant in Australia. Her story from Sydney 2000 is one of the greatest fables in the history of the Games. As part of her address, Freeman told the commission: “The vast desert land with its wide, open skies and incredible red land was another perfect setting to cultivate my love of running.”

When she spoke of her family, stretching back generations, it sent chills down the spine of those weighing up Brisbane’s move to the top of the pile.

Sydney beach volleyball champion Natalie Cook also lent her voice, as did Bridie Kean, a wheelchair basketballer who was part of teams that won bronze and silver medals across Beijing and London. Coates also played his part, as did Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk and federal Sports Minister Richard Colbeck.

After the turmoil of Tokyo, Brisbane bid organisers and the AOC had the distinct feeling the IOC was in the mood to have its mind made up well in advance, so it went big and it went early. When the Future Hosts Commission was presented with an offer that was too good to refuse, it duly gave Brisbane sole access to IOC dialogue until the final requirements are fulfilled, possibly as early as midway through the year.

There were other notable ticks for south-east Queensland in the IOC’s decision, which was made under a revised bidding process that has removed “The winner is ... Sydney!” style reveal, along with the hugely expensive and often questionable courting process that was its precursor.

Some issues were more quantitative; basics such as the number of hotel rooms. Brisbane and the Gold and Sunshine coasts have more on the way but already satisfy the IOC requirements for a host region. Others spoke of loyalty to the Olympic cause, with the nation having sent athletes to every edition of the modern Summer Games.

There were also external players that had made their voices heard, one of which was US television giant NBC, which paid some $US7.5b for exclusive broadcast rights to show the Summer Games of 2024, 2028 and 2032 along with their winter counterparts.

With Queensland’s world-class coasts to provide a dazzling television backdrop to the Olympic broadcast, awarding the Games to Brisbane and surrounds would be a move met with their weighty blessing.

This was a well-planned sting at every level and relied on strict secrecy during its execution. Those involved in the bid knew early in the week a momentous decision was going to be handed down but, incredibly, the only leak came from the other side of the world, when respected Olympic news service Inside The Games broke news of Queensland’s impending coronation.

 

By Wednesday afternoon, Coates had already planned a morning media blitz on Thursday, before joining Palaszczuk for a press conference at Queensland’s Parliament House.

Celebrations have been muted and as the IOC went to great pains to point out, it’s not quite over the line yet. But everyone knows this deal is as good as done, while Coates could just barely resist a subtle compliment for his own handiwork when asked for his reaction by 2GB’s Ben Fordham.

“Not bad, hey?”

 

 

 

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i was driving around Brisbane last night and you could not keep the smile off my face. I was thinking about potential pre-Olympics training camp venues just in the Brisbane area and two  came to mind.

 

1 - The university of Queensland  (8.5 Km from the CBD by road) 

Sports: Rugby, Athletics, field sports, Swimming, Fencing, Hockey, Squash, Volleyball and Weightlifting

 

UQ is Queenslands oldest university and has facilities for a far number of sports - a 50m swimming pool, purpose built hockey and rugby fields and a proper athletics track with some field sport (javelin, discus, shot put, long and high jump).

it is also relatively isolated at the riverside suburb of St Lucia, but with excellent transport links to other areas (UQ is the second biggest destination for public transport outside Brisbane city, with multiple bus and fast ferry links to the CBD and by the time the games are here the Brisbane metro should be up and running)

The only downside is accommodation, as whilst there are student colleges this is likely to be full with students at the time, but this would be where i pick if i was organizing a national teams pre-games camp

 

2 -  Griffith Uni / QEII Stadium

Sports: Rugby, Athletics, field sports (14 Km to CBD by road)

 

I've put these two venues together as QEII is used by Griffith uni for things like exams (and i think it is managed by them too) as well as being right next to each other. This is dependent on what Brisbane do for a new stadium (if they do indeed build one or refurbish or refurbish QEII)  

QEII was the stadium used in the Brisbane commonwealth games and is still in decent shape. Once again accommodation is an issue but it is more isolated than UQ and this could be an advantage

 

In terms of live sites, with big screens and possibly entertainment, i would have the following sites;

 

1 - King George Square. Brisbane's City Square and a natural gathering place for the people of Brisbane. often used as a site of protest  and gatherings such as Christmas markets, this is almost a definite live site

 

2 - Southbank. The site of Expo 88 this is a beautiful site that is open for the people of Brisbane. I have seen reports this will be the site of the archery, and there are some spots where a big screen can be set up and poeple can gather.

 

3 - Queens Wharf sky deck - as part of the multibillion doller development of a high end shopping mall, casino and hotels the is also a large number of public spaces planned including an open air cinema

 

4 - Cavill Ave, Surfers Paradise. another open air mall. This site could be on the beach at the end of Cavill ave which is used for Schoolies (a big celebration when students finish high school) or the mall itself

 

 

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