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1 hour ago, Tulsa said:

It  seems to be a spread bid. It could be more compact with only Brisbane and Gold Coast. Brisbane + Toowoomba + Sunshine coast + Gold Coast, it's to much if we compare with the latest summer Bids. Excepted this point, this bid could be a good one. 

All of the major venues should be within a 100km radius of Brisbane city - which is kind of OK I guess.

The goal is to utilise and upgrade as many existing venues as possible - however there will still be a lot of construction going on.

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Australia’s Bid Hopes To Make “The Greatest Pitch The Olympic Movement Has Ever Seen”

Posted on Sep 6, 2019 12:19 PM by Robert Livingstone in FeaturedFuture Summer Bids

Australia’s bid to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2032 will take its pitch to Lausanne, Switzerland next week for key meetings with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) at the organization’s new headquarters.

Federal Member of Parliament Ted O’Brien will represent the Prime Minister as part of the delegation that, he says, will spend much of the time listening to the IOC to lay the groundwork for a Southeast Queensland bid to host the Games in Australia for a third time.

“I want to ensure we’re gleaning every possible insight from the IOC so we can put together the greatest pitch the Olympic Movement has ever seen,” O’Brien told Australian Associated Press.

Led by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk, the multi-partisan team hopes to show that Australia is united behind plans to host the Games.

“The fact we wear different political stripes just goes to show how serious we are about working together,” O’Brien said.

Southeast Queensland Council of Mayors (SEQ) representative Mark Jamieson will also join the delegation that plans to meet with representatives of the Paris 2024 organizing committee and the International Paralympic Committee.  He claims the Games costs will not be a burden to taxpayers after the promised financial contribution by the IOC, and plans to use existing venues across the broad region.  He believes the Games could even generate a small surplus.

“We can use existing facilities.  Clearly some need upgrades and we do need some new investment in others to deliver what’s required for the Games. But this is one of the fastest growing places in the country,” Jamieson told the Brisbane Times.

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President and IOC Vice President Jim Coates has been encouraging the bid, but also insisted that plans should only move forward if the region commits to necessary transport upgrades and puts them in place by 2032.  These are already part of long-term development plans.

Coates was the architect behind the IOC’s recently redesigned bid process that allows for regional bids with an emphasis on using existing venues to keep costs low.

However general infrastructure projects to support the Games, including those for transportation upgrades that are needed even without the Games, have caused major cost over runs while planning recent Olympics as projects faced the added pressure of delivering within a set time box.

Australia’s bid emerged as an early favorite this year after Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged AUD $10 million (USD $6.85 million) towards developing plans, claiming the expense was warranted even if the IOC doesn’t choose Australia to host the Games.

Queensland could face rivals on the International stage including from India, Indonesia, China and jointly between North and South Korea.

Under new bidding rules unveiled in June that drop the strict scheduling around the process, the race for all future Games including 2032 has now opened.  New future Games commissions for both Summer and Winter editions will liaise with all interested cities and select qualified bids when the timing makes sense.

Former rules would have seen the 2032 host city chosen in 2025 but Coates has hinted that the selection could now happen as early as next year.

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This whole approach seems crazy to me. Brisbane and Queensland should be thinking about what works for them and then seeing how that could work for an Olympic bid rather than making the "best bid ever" and then trying to figure out the legacy afterwards. But maybe I don't understand the Australian point of view.

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19 hours ago, Nacre said:

This whole approach seems crazy to me. Brisbane and Queensland should be thinking about what works for them and then seeing how that could work for an Olympic bid rather than making the "best bid ever" and then trying to figure out the legacy afterwards. But maybe I don't understand the Australian point of view.

Basically you have a federal and a state Government desperate to be able to say they have made a big move and brought something "good" to Australia.

Our self esteem as a nation is really tied up with punching above our weight and being seen as a big player in the world. Of course we are not - but we do a few things well - hosting events is one of them.  The Government is playing a dangerous game though - there is a huge amount of people who don't want their tax dollars spent this way. 

The whole Sydney stadium fuckery as well as the underwhelming 2018 Gold Coast Commonwealth Games have negated a lot of enthusiasm for huge sporting events. In my day to day dealings with people I am yet to hear anyone say they back a SEQ bid - if anything it is met with a roll of the eyes.  I am sure if we get them the story will change to slight ezxcitement (until the ticket prices are announced and no-one gets decent seats to anything) - but for now we have an economy that is not very strong, massive amounts of personal and national debt - and a city bidding that has a lot of locals scratching their heads. 

Yes yes - we know the IOC's window for hosting the Games is pretty much set in stone, however the average man on the street looks at Brisbane and then looks at Melbourne and wonders why we are spending money up North when they are basically ready down South. There is no need for another major stadium in Brisbane. There will need to be billions spent on basic infrastructure. I live in Brisbane and dread the mess a Games will bring - and I love the Olympics. Australia in 2019 is not the Australia that got behind the Sydney bid in 1991-1993.

However - as always - our politicians refuse to read the room and barge in head first.

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Queensland does not need new 80,000-seat Olympics stadium: Coates

by Felicity Caldwell, Brisbane Times, 11:30am September 11, 2019

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/queensland/queensland-does-not-need-new-80-000-seat-olympics-stadium-coates-20190911-p52q69.html

 

Queensland does not need to build a new 80,000-seat stadium to host a successful Olympic Games, the committee's bosses in Switzerland have been told.

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates was part of a delegation invited to discuss to Lausanne, Switzerland, this week to discuss a potential Queensland bid for the Olympics in 2032.

Mr Coates said there was no requirement for a new 80,000-seat stadium in Brisbane, arguing a smaller venue could be built.

"The maximum is 60,000, that's what's been provided in Tokyo, that's what London provided," he said.

"And that could be a stadium that could reduce to a lesser amount afterwards, depending on what the legacy is going to be - no requirement for 80,000."

For the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020, Japan is building a 68,000-seat stadium with a capacity of more than 80,000 using temporary seating.

The London Stadium was able to host 80,000 spectators for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics but reopened in July 2016 as the home of West Ham United with 66,000 seats.

Asked if Queensland could therefore use an existing stadium, Mr Coates admitted a new facility would need to be built, saying "there isn't a stadium, to my mind".

"I think there'll be something developed for athletics and the ceremonies, there is an option with the Gabba," he said.

"But probably, I think, a new stadium has to be prepared, but similar to the way that it was done with London, it could reduce to something afterwards.

"The days of 80,000, the days of 115,000 for Sydney is not required."

Mr Coates said the Olympic Games could provide a boost to Australian sport.

"Australian sport needs another impetus; it's 32 years since we had the Games and we know what an impetus that was across a whole range of sports," he said.

"Increased participation, there'll be venues, the venues that have been talked of, the new ones, they're all community venues that will be created in the most part, before the Games, they'll be used by communities, they'll be transformed for the Games and then they'll go back to the communities afterwards."

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said Queensland had 85 per cent of the venues required to host an Olympic Games in 2032.

Ms Palaszczuk said she hoped a value assessment for the Games could be done by the end of November.

International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described the meeting with the Australian delegation as "excellent and very fruitful".

"We are even more impressed than I was already during my recent visit in Brisbane and Queensland when we could see how advanced the preparations were already at the time," he said.

"We have seen further progress here today when the project has been presented.

"This project has all the ingredients to become a successful candidature."

Ms Palaszczuk plans to fly back to Queensland earlier than expected to deal with the bushfire crisis.

Earlier this year, it was revealed an Olympic Games could be hosted in Queensland with a cost-neutral impact.

The Council of Mayors previously investigated a multi-city bid for the Olympic Games with events across Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast, the Gold Coast, Ipswich, Toowoomba, Redland, Moreton Bay and Logan instead of the traditional single-city bid.

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IOC President Bach Says Australia’s 2032 Olympic Bid Could Be Elected Early

Posted on Sep 10, 2019 6:44 PM by Robert Livingstone in Featured, Future Summer Bids

 

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach warmly welcomed delegates representing Queensland Australia’s 2032 Olympic and Paralympic Games bid Tuesday as the yet-confirmed bid was soft launched among top officials.

Leaders presented what they claim to be efficient plans that would leverage 85 percent existing facilities across South East Queensland to stage the events.  By investing the expected USD $1.8 billion (AUD $2.6 billion) contribution by the IOC derived from broadcast and sponsorship revenues, it is hoped the Games would help deliver necessary transportation upgrades across the region and an 80,000 seat Olympic Stadium in State Capital Brisbane.

To complement an existing Olympic Village that was built for the Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast last year, another complex to house Olympic Athletes would be developed in Brisbane should the city be chosen to host the Games.

The high-level bipartisan group that traveled to IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland was led by Queensland Premier Annastacia Palazczuk and included Federal MP Ted O’Brien who represented the Prime Minister and Mayor Mark Jamieson who represented the South East Queensland Council of Mayors.

Palaszczuk received criticism from political rivals at home due to her travel while deadly bush fires ravage parts of Queensland, but her defenders claimed this meeting was critical for the bid that could benefit the region for generations.

Instead, Palaszczuk cancelled her meeting in Paris with the 2024 Olympic organizing committee so she could return to Australia two days early.

Palazczuk dined one-on-one with President Bach for lunch Tuesday, discussing bid plans that are strongly supported cross-party by all relevant governments in Australia, and by taxpayers according to recent polls.

“This is not only impressive, but at this early stage innovative to have all parties united behind this Olympic project and behind sport in Australia,” Bach said.

“The ball is in your court,” he said, “to digest this information and to see what it means for you and then to take a sound decision.”

Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) President John Coates, who also serves as IOC Vice President, echoed Bach’s sentiment.

“The overwhelming message the Queensland team can take home is that putting together a viable candidature is very much a partnership between the potential host and the IOC.”

“The IOC team could not have been more helpful in providing expert insight into where the Olympic movement is heading, how the Olympic sports program works, Games funding and the risks and opportunities Queensland should consider.

“There’s a strong recognition of Australian expertise and the considerable benefits that a Queensland Games could deliver,” Coates said, adding that Bach’s words amounted to a strong endorsement by the IOC.

Indicating that he was impressed, Bach’s remarks also made clear that the 2032 bid is Queensland’s to lose should the region choose to move forward with a campaign.  He confirmed that if the Australian project was in place, the IOC would be in a position to elect the bid sooner than seven years before the Opening Ceremony (2025), a mark that has been typical in past bids.

In June the IOC dramatically reformed the bid process making the timetable flexible, and opening the doors to multi-city and regional bids – the latter allowing the campaign from Queensland instead of a more concentrated and costly effort by Brisbane alone.

The resulting efficiencies have led organizers to believe they can deliver a cost-neutral Games – a bold claim following the era where most Games suffered from huge cost over runs.

Australia’s bid emerged as an early favorite this year after Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged AUD $10 million (USD $6.85 million) towards developing plans, claiming the expense was warranted even if the IOC doesn’t choose Australia to host the Games.

Queensland could face rivals on the International stage including from India, Indonesia, China and jointly between North and South Korea.

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If the IOC are desperate for an Australian Games (& with recent experience & the memories of Sydney, you can see why they would be), surely it’s simpler & better for everyone to allow Melbourne to stage it in late August/early-mid September? They say Brisbane has 85% existing venues across the state, but Melbourne could host almost everything in the city, & are almost literally ready to host now. Do NBC really wield this much power?

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It's not just NBC. The calendars of every summer Olympic sport would have to be torn up and adjusted, and that would be a massive disruption. And it would be an even bigger problem for team sports as the IOC has either very indirect control or no control at all over the various sports leagues around the world.

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10 minutes ago, Nacre said:

It's not just NBC. The calendars of every summer Olympic sport would have to be torn up and adjusted, and that would be a massive disruption. And it would be an even bigger problem for team sports as the IOC has either very indirect control or no control at all over the various sports leagues around the world.

And yet they were able to do that in 2000. It is not impossible - just undesirable.  The Australian time zone (and Tokyo/Beijing etc) is poison for NBC anyway.  

There are further world championships/golden league/grand prix after the Olympics in Olympic years so the federations could make it work - the question is really why should they.

Melbourne could host the same dates Sydney did - yes there is a higher chance of rain but mid September is cool - yet mild. The IOC however have said no.

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17 hours ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

And yet they were able to do that in 2000. It is not impossible - just undesirable.  The Australian time zone (and Tokyo/Beijing etc) is poison for NBC anyway.  

There are further world championships/golden league/grand prix after the Olympics in Olympic years so the federations could make it work - the question is really why should they.

Melbourne could host the same dates Sydney did - yes there is a higher chance of rain but mid September is cool - yet mild. The IOC however have said no.

NBC did not yield the same power when the Sydney Games were awarded in 1993 as they do today.  The broadcast rights for Sydney weren’t even awarded until 1995.  In 1993, the U.S. networks were focused on bidding for the rights to the Atlanta Games.  It was after the 2000 Games that NBC went to the IOC and said no more Olympics in September.

The Asian/Australian time zones are not poison for NBC as long as they can manipulate the schedule so that major events are held during the day and shown live in primetime in the U.S.  

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Haven't been on here much but I have been following Brisbane's progress and I have to say i'm still a bit stunned.

People keep me asking me what I think of Brisbane 2032 and the whole time i've said, it's not going to happen, it's good to put us on the map with a bid but we won't win. Now Palaszczuk is in Lausanne, apparently an announcement is expected to be made by the end of the year now the bid team said. I think I heard Bach say this is the most prepared they've seen any bid in history this far out. There's just no discussion of any potential opponent, nobody has really been given a chance cause clearly Queensland/Brisbane want to lock things up nice and early. I mean 13 years is a huge amount of time to plan a games, 85% of the venues are existing or already in motion. The big flaw is a lack of a big stadium but there's a few options on that one. A few different places where one could be built, I recall Victoria Park being floated as an idea, QEII could be knocked down and rebuilt, Coates said the Gabba isn't off the table (not sure about that one). As said, with 13 years to go, the options are there. 

I still feel like 2032 isn't going to be awarded to Brisbane but Brisbane will be the Australian bid. People here really need to stop mentioning Melbourne. That's just not happening. 

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21 hours ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

And yet they were able to do that in 2000. It is not impossible - just undesirable. 

True, and there are a few sports like tennis that are better served with a September Olympics than an August Olympics. 

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On 9/12/2019 at 3:24 PM, Olympic Fan Darcy said:

I still feel like 2032 isn't going to be awarded to Brisbane but Brisbane will be the Australian bid. People here really need to stop mentioning Melbourne. That's just not happening. 

I agree that commentary about Melbourne is futile since they are not bidding,

However, I think Brisbane / South East Queensland is clearly the frontrunner and could be awarded the Games as early as next year.

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Sure seems like the IOC is going with a targeted approach. Consider the options so far; Indonesia, India (the IOC isn't going to a developing country after the Rio debacle), China (hard to see them going back so soon unless there was no other option), a joint Korea bid (fantasy at best). Western Europe (Paris) has 2024 and the U.S. has 2028. Not many options left other than Australia so it makes sense to try to lock 2032 in.

The problem is from a feasibility standpoint it's the wrong city. Yes Melbourne has shown no interest in bidding so I agree it's a non starter but compared to Brisbane it's far more ready facilities wise. Brisbane, in a time when the IOC is desperate for a PR win and keeping costs down, is looking at bid that could get out of hand cost wise very quickly. For starters, Brisbane has no need for a an 80,000 capacity Olympic Stadium that would become a white elephant afterwards with no permanent tenant. And I don't buy the argument that 85 percent of the venues are already in place when considering in the initial feasibility study so many venues were set to be constructed with the legacy "community centres." which sounds very similar to what Rio proposed. Then there's the whole matter of the needed transportation upgrades and hotel rooms. It can get very expensive very quickly. I could see a budget easily surpassing the 20$ million mark.

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On 9/11/2019 at 11:51 AM, AustralianFan said:

Queensland does not need new 80,000-seat Olympics stadium: Coates

by Felicity Caldwell, Brisbane Times, 11:30am September 11, 2019

https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/politics/queensland/queensland-does-not-need-new-80-000-seat-olympics-stadium-coates-20190911-p52q69.html

 

Queensland does not need to build a new 80,000-seat stadium to host a successful Olympic Games, the committee's bosses in Switzerland have been told.

Australian Olympic Committee president John Coates was part of a delegation invited to discuss to Lausanne, Switzerland, this week to discuss a potential Queensland bid for the Olympics in 2032.

Mr Coates said there was no requirement for a new 80,000-seat stadium in Brisbane, arguing a smaller venue could be built.

"The maximum is 60,000, that's what's been provided in Tokyo, that's what London provided," he said.

"And that could be a stadium that could reduce to a lesser amount afterwards, depending on what the legacy is going to be - no requirement for 80,000."

For the Tokyo Olympic Games in 2020, Japan is building a 68,000-seat stadium with a capacity of more than 80,000 using temporary seating.

The London Stadium was able to host 80,000 spectators for the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics but reopened in July 2016 as the home of West Ham United with 66,000 seats.

Asked if Queensland could therefore use an existing stadium, Mr Coates admitted a new facility would need to be built, saying "there isn't a stadium, to my mind".

"I think there'll be something developed for athletics and the ceremonies, there is an option with the Gabba," he said.

"But probably, I think, a new stadium has to be prepared, but similar to the way that it was done with London, it could reduce to something afterwards.

"The days of 80,000, the days of 115,000 for Sydney is not required."

Mr Coates said the Olympic Games could provide a boost to Australian sport.

"Australian sport needs another impetus; it's 32 years since we had the Games and we know what an impetus that was across a whole range of sports," he said.

"Increased participation, there'll be venues, the venues that have been talked of, the new ones, they're all community venues that will be created in the most part, before the Games, they'll be used by communities, they'll be transformed for the Games and then they'll go back to the communities afterwards."

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said Queensland had 85 per cent of the venues required to host an Olympic Games in 2032.

Ms Palaszczuk said she hoped a value assessment for the Games could be done by the end of November.

International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach described the meeting with the Australian delegation as "excellent and very fruitful".

"We are even more impressed than I was already during my recent visit in Brisbane and Queensland when we could see how advanced the preparations were already at the time," he said.

"We have seen further progress here today when the project has been presented.

"This project has all the ingredients to become a successful candidature."

Ms Palaszczuk plans to fly back to Queensland earlier than expected to deal with the bushfire crisis.

Earlier this year, it was revealed an Olympic Games could be hosted in Queensland with a cost-neutral impact.

The Council of Mayors previously investigated a multi-city bid for the Olympic Games with events across Brisbane, the Sunshine Coast, the Gold Coast, Ipswich, Toowoomba, Redland, Moreton Bay and Logan instead of the traditional single-city bid.

 

3 hours ago, stryker said:

For starters, Brisbane has no need for a an 80,000 capacity Olympic Stadium that would become a white elephant afterwards with no permanent tenant.

Refer above IOC John Coates last week (quoted above) saying that a Brisbane Olympics does not need an 80,000 seat stadium.

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Even a 60,000 seat stadium would still be very costly, however. Presumably it wouldn't be as expensive as Optus Stadium's $1.6 billion AU cost. Temporary stadiums have cost 1/2 to 2/3rds the cost of permanent structures at previous Olympics. (See London's water polo and basketball arenas, for example.) But even half of the cost of Perth's stadium would be $800 million AU for the sake of a 17 day event with no obvious long term use, as none of the sports teams in Queensland need a 60,000 seat venue. 

On the flip side if Brisbane can pull this off without any white elephants left after the circus has packed up and left, then it would genuinely show the IOC has changed. And it would also be a monumental achievement for Brisbane and Queensland.

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Couldn’t you make use of a Perth type stadium to replace the Gabba? 60000 Aussies in a brand new Brisbane stadium would make a pretty intimidating place to start the Ashes...

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Brisbane doesn't need a 60,000 seat stadium either. What sports franchise even needs a stadium in Brisbane? To my knowledge, the Gabba is supposed to get a 100$ million upgrade. The whole reducing a stadium to 15,000-20,000 from 60,000 has yet to be shown to be a viable option. It's a white elephant either way unless there's a permanent tenant.

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I know this point was asked not to be brought up again, and they aren't technically bidding, but damn, I'd really be much more behind this if it were Melbourne. They haven't had the Games in the television era so it really would be new to many, and by 2032, most of the people who watched Melbourne 1956 would be dead or very very old. It's about time this city comes back to the limelight. Plus, they have many of the venues not only already built, but already in use, and not to mention the necessary infrastructure and population boom to keep the facilities in use. 

 

The argument that Brisbane 2032 would "bring good things to Australia" could be applied to Melbourne, and given Melbourne's experience with hosting the Games (and many other international competitions) before, I'm really wondering why Melbourne was not the frontrunner. Does anyone know why Brisbane was chosen over Melbourne? Was it because it was the next big Australian city to lose its hosting virginity? Or were the people just not about it? I truly want to know, because if angry taxpayers in Brisbane will be a deterrent to 2032, I'm wondering how it'll fare in Melbourne, as not only is the city and its metro area of a completely different political mindset, but taxpayer dollars would go to things such as expanded highways, public transportation, and housing over massive sports venues, which more people would probably be able to get behind because then the citizens too can feel the positive effects of the Games. Can anyone actually explain to me why Melbourne wasn't selected? I was not following the Aussie bid close enough because I guess I didn't think it would get too far.

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Because the Olympic opening ceremony can now only be held on the last or second-last Friday in July. In Melbourne, late July-early August is...bleh. I agree they managed to make the global sport schedule fit a September Olympics in 2000, so they could surely have the wit to do it again - & that that’d be a better way to get Australia the Games. But apparently it’s a big no-no. 

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3 hours ago, anthonyliberatori said:

Can anyone actually explain to me why Melbourne wasn't selected? I was not following the Aussie bid close enough because I guess I didn't think it would get too far.

Two factors - the IOC's apparently non-negotible hosting window and the AOC's refusal to back a Melbourne bid.,  The first is due to TV rights, the second is due to the head of the AOC being a bit of a dick and Melbourne has a relatively mild - yet wet - winter.  July/August has fog, rain. sometimes snow on the higher hills and day time temperatures rarely above 18 degrees celcius.  Never mind that the vast majority of sports are indoors and long distance athletes have repeatedly stated they'd rather run a marathon in cooler weather...

So that is it.  Climate, John Coates and NBC basically.

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1 hour ago, thatsnotmypuppy said:

Two factors - the IOC's apparently non-negotible hosting window and the AOC's refusal to back a Melbourne bid.,  The first is due to TV rights, the second is due to the head of the AOC being a bit of a dick and Melbourne has a relatively mild - yet wet - winter.  July/August has fog, rain. sometimes snow on the higher hills and day time temperatures rarely above 18 degrees celcius.  Never mind that the vast majority of sports are indoors and long distance athletes have repeatedly stated they'd rather run a marathon in cooler weather...

So that is it.  Climate, John Coates and NBC basically.

Better yet why didn't Sydney put up a bid?

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59 minutes ago, Hightowerio86 said:

Better yet why didn't Sydney put up a bid?

Similar - though milder weather issues.  Remember - in 2000 the Games started mid September.

Sydney no longer has a stadium that can realistically fit a track without major deck work - reducing capacity and sight lines.  Also there hasn't really been any interest from Sydney to host a major event - bar the current FIFA Women's World Cup bid.

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19 hours ago, yoshi said:

Couldn’t you make use of a Perth type stadium to replace the Gabba? 60000 Aussies in a brand new Brisbane stadium would make a pretty intimidating place to start the Ashes...

Brisbane Lions average 27,511 fans/match

Brisbane Heat average 22,343

Gold Coast Suns average 19,810

Brisbane Roar average 9,632

Sure, the stadium would sell out when Brisbane hosted a major international competition, but how often will that happen? The local sports teams only need 25,000-40,000 seats, and Brisbane already has two stadiums for that role.

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1 hour ago, Nacre said:

Brisbane Lions average 27,511 fans/match

Brisbane Heat average 22,343

Gold Coast Suns average 19,810

Brisbane Roar average 9,632

Sure, the stadium would sell out when Brisbane hosted a major international competition, but how often will that happen? The local sports teams only need 25,000-40,000 seats, and Brisbane already has two stadiums for that role.

The Gabba is in a very built up area. The new metro station and road expansion will not allow any expansion beyond it's original footprint.  It is surrounded by high rise apartments and retail areas on all the other sides. The Gabba board is also hugely protective of the ground and is about to sink a considerable sum in upgrading plumbing, electrics, seating and the under pitch infrastructure.  It is Brisbane's only major oval ground - and there is no way it will be taken offline for a few years to build it up to Olympic Stadium standard.  The Lions members will not consider multiple seasons being based down at Metricon Stadium on the Gold Coast either.  Brisbane will get a new stadium - possibly to be built at Bowen Hills.  It does not need a new stadium though and any discussions to the contrary are hot air.

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