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2. A Revival of Greek Pride I don't think anyone would argue that the Athens 2004 teetered on the precipice of collapse only months out from the opening ceremony, yet the actual games ran incredibly well. Having turned around a potentially disastrous situation and shown that Greece was capable of mounting successfully such a huge event, even if it cost the earth, certainly boosted Greek confidence. We all recall vividly some of the 'told you so' posts here in GamesBids, and perhaps this self-belief rubbed off on the Euro 2004 campaign and even Eurovision 2005. Even the Thanou/Kenderis saga couldn't dent this resurgance.

In retrospect, the Athens 2004 games will probably regarded as a great games marred by some unique and atypical problems. Maybe not as successful as Sydney nor Barcelona, but certainly not as ill-regarded as Montreal or Atlanta.

Primarily, I would argue that Athens teetered on the precipice of collapse. Of course it didn't.  I find it incredible that many forumers who are members of the triad of media and press partiality (US, Australia and UK), still believe the nonsense that Athens was never going to make it. Of course everyone new that there were delays, however, to suggest that they were on the verge of collapse is absolutely ridiculous.  That sentiment counld not have been further from the truth in Greece.  Everyone was confident that everyhting would get done, and of course, it did.

Let me also clarify that greek pride had neither vanished nor dissappeared and hence it did not need any revival. Greece won the Euro 2004 in June (prior to the Olympic games) which actually acted as a secret source of confidence for eveyone other that greece.

I personally think that Athens was better than both Sydney and Barcelona.  Please do not forget that Sydney had her fair share of problems too (between Gosper and tickets etc) and her Olympics lacked personality.  As I am sure that London will in 2012.

And finally, as for Athens being a games 'that tried too hard' by the always intelligent Baron, is it really possible for an Olympic city to try to hard? You can certainly, however, not try hard enough, and I think Baron's comments, as always, stem from the ineptitude he feels whenever he thinks of Atlanta.  'How Y'all doin' Baron?

Oh dear...there is a difference between pride and jingoism, and I know who can't distinguish between the two...

To say that the Athens Games didn't teeter on the brink of being cancelled is just ridiculous. Have a look at some of these archived sites:

7.30 Report Transcription

Samaranch 'Yellow Card' Warning

Greece In Fresh Games Warning

Athens Almost Lost Games Says Samaranch

There is no denying that from the problems of 2000 ATHOC and Greece swung things around and mounted a great Olympics. But please...considering that Thucydides the first great historian to review the past with a view for impartiality was Athenian, don't ignore his legacy and try and reshape the past.

As for ticket problems in Sydney 2000, the distrubition process was marred with political bungling, woeful marketing and very ordinary allocations. But, and here is a demonstrable statistic form the IOC, Sydney sold more tickets than Athens both in total and as a percentage. See here:

IOC Ticketing History

72% tickets sold and only $228 million US in revenue for ATHOC from ticket sales is very ordinary, and compares very unfavourable to Sydney's 88% and $551 million US revenue; for a badly marketed and run ticketing programme Sydney 2000 did a sh-tload better than Athens.

And finally, Sydney 2000 lacked personality? Where the hell did you get that from? Where you here during the games? Here's what Seb Coe said recently:

Coe said: "We all accept that Sydney was the high-water mark of Olympic Games, both in organisation and the concept behind the Games.

"It happened to be the biggest birthday party in the history of the Olympics.

Source

And just as the Sydney 2000 games were closing, here's what Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki said:

Statement of Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, President Athens 2004 Summer Olympic Organizing Committee

           

SYDNEY, Australia, Sept. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- The following is a statement issued by Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki, President of the Athens 2004 Summer Olympic Organizing Committee:

"With the closing ceremony, the torch of responsibility now passes to Athens, and we will create a triumphant and meaningful homecoming for the Olympic Games in 2004.

"As our observer team from Athens 2004 concludes our work in Australia, we wish to congratulate Sydney for an exceptional job hosting the Olympics.  We are inspired and challenged by your example.  We have spent the last month

here studying Sydney's efforts in detail.  We have gained valuable knowledge from the extremely successful management of these Games."

Source

So, care to argue with evidence how a games that supposedly lacked personality inspired the very capable (in fact, the real heroine of the Athens 2004 games) Angelopoulos-Dasalaki. If anyone wants to offer a personal appreciation of either games, fair enough, but at least throw in some evidence or citations...don't just base it on a few moments watching it on TV.

Alexjc Posted on July 19 2005,09:21

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Yes, Athens made it in the end, and they were great.  Of course they will go down as being the games that just made it but I would have to say I enjoied them far better than Sydney with all it's outlandish extravagence.  

Um..."outlandish extravagence"? The final auditor's report for the Sydney Games showed that there was expenditure of $A3,459 million dollars on event related costs and $A3,025 million on venues and facilities. How can this be extravagent contrasted with the reports of the Athens games costing at least $US8.6 billion (or $A11.418 billion in today's US/Australian conversion)? In light of this evidence it's easy to see who had the more extravagent games.

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there was one negative thing which hasn´t been mentioned yet: the audience... in many cases the spectators really pissed me off. like:

leaving OAKA (thousands!) BEFORE the 100m women finals;

chearing for kenteris and disturbing the athletes in purpose before their start;

being ignorant many times towards amazing achievements of non-greek athletes.

in many cases i got the impression people were not really there for SPORTS. they were there to have a family event and to eat their sunday french fries. no real attention or "emotinal presence", no sensitivity for moments and drama. it seemed to me most of the people didn´t know anything about what was going on/about rules/about who is who etc. it was mostly about the greeks...

no offense. and i know that im generalizing. just my impression. and i was there. guess this was the biggest difference between athens and sydney. sydneysiders massively supported aussies AND all the other atheletes. and they showed strong interest in all kinds of sports.

they were there to have a family event andto eat their sunday french fries.
 

THAT'S A LIE!

We NEVER eat french fries on Sunday! :oh:

oh, ok, i agree. i forgot what they were eating.... :oops: but the point was that maaaany weren´t paying attention at all.

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And finally, as for Athens being a games 'that tried too hard' by the always intelligent Baron, is it really possible for an Olympic city to try to hard? You can certainly, however, not try hard enough, and I think Baron's comments, as always, stem from the ineptitude he feels whenever he thinks of Atlanta.  'How Y'all doin' Baron?

Another stupid and banal comment from the "car."  

I have nothing but good memories about Atlanta.  They weren't perfect as the over-rated Athens Games are.  But what Games are?  I mean they're just the most recent that's why all u newbies are still gaga and aglow over a really hurried put together Games.  I mean - what's so new about putting on an Olympic Games.  Been there; done that.

It was a life-long experience for me -- and at least I am honest enough to say - with warts and all -- after all we are only human, unlike the Greeks who think they are deities  :rolleyes:  (of course, only to be struck down by their own gods for pride...) that they had their problems.  You can tarnish Atlanta all you want - but you aren't even on my radar, Lexus, when I think of them.  Athens will soon fade into history as well.  And at least Athens, Georgia can truthfully say they hosted (part of) the Centennial Olympic Games of 1996 and NOT a certain arrogant city in the Aegean.   :P   :unclesam:

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Please do not forget that Sydney had her fair share of problems too (between Gosper and tickets etc) and her Olympics lacked personality.  As I am sure that London will in 2012.

Jonno's right. Stupid comment. Stupid because Sydney was fantastic, and stupid because London is seven years away and if you can claim this from looking at what is, at the moment, a patch of muddy grass in East London you're a genius! Also, if you think our world famous existing venues (Wimbledon, Wembley, Lords, Horseguards, the Royal Parks, the Dome, Old Trafford etc.) and passionate and knowledgable sports fans won't lend the games a unique personality, then your definition of "personality" differs to mine.

Perhaps there is more truth in your final comments than you realise. My definition of personality in an Olympic games is culture, and for that reason, Barcelona was fantastic, as I am sure Beijing will. As for Sydney, despite a superbly organised games, I felt that the games lacked personality, an identity (even despite the token aboriginal appearances). I apologise if this qualifies for 'stupid comment' however this is how the games came across to me. Atlanta, same story (but far worse).  And for that reason alone, I was hoping that Paris (or even Moscow and Madrid) would win 2012.  However, perhaps I was too hard on London.  Given that this it is an amazing city, I believe that London organisers can overcome the sedulous and systematic banality that has been dished up be previous Westerns.

Now as for you Easybus, no one is suggesting that the Athens project was not ridden with delays.  However, given the confidence of Rogue, given the confidence of the ATHOC and the Greek government, media (from Australia, US and UK) ignored the reality in the final years of preparation went on an absolute rampage. (remember, Samaranch gave warnings 3 years prior to the Olympics).  Now after I had made specific points about the media in the 'triad of impartiality' - you go and start referencing articles from, let's see - the US, Australia, and the UK. Have you missed the point all together?

Additionally, please do not nominate the jingoists because I find it hard to believe that your continous defense of the Sydney games stems from your true and altruistic unbiased opinion. My mention of Sydney's ticket problems was certainly not a comparitive move, I was just highlighting that every OC has their problems leading up to the games, however in retrospect, they are not remembered. To compare Athens and Sydney ticket sales exudes your own bias.

I was simply attempting to clarify some of the inconsistencies in your post; namely, that Greek pride was not at an all time low - in fact most people in Greece were confident that the games would be a success.  There was no sense of dire time constraints and eternal IOC damnation as was advertised abroad.

And secondly, the apparent self belief that the games 'rubbed off' onto the Greek Euro campaign is non existant because the Greek success in Portugal happened BEFORE the Olympics.

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Now as for you Easybus, no one is suggesting that the Athens project was not ridden with delays.  However, given the confidence of Rogue, given the confidence of the ATHOC and the Greek government, media (from Australia, US and UK) ignored the reality in the final years of preparation went on an absolute rampage. (remember, Samaranch gave warnings 3 years prior to the Olympics).  Now after I had made specific points about the media in the 'triad of impartiality' - you go and start referencing articles from, let's see - the US, Australia, and the UK. Have you missed the point all together?

Additionally, please do not nominate the jingoists because I find it hard to believe that your continous defense of the Sydney games stems from your true and altruistic unbiased opinion. My mention of Sydney's ticket problems was certainly not a comparitive move, I was just highlighting that every OC has their problems leading up to the games, however in retrospect, they are not remembered. To compare Athens and Sydney ticket sales exudes your own bias.

Um...missed the point? it is you Lexus who can't even see or understand what you yourself argue, and change your point.

First off, you say that you argue against my statement that the Athens games were never teetering on the edge of collapse. I cite several articles (yes, they are from English-language media, but as (a) my first and best language is English and (B) this is generally an English language forum then they are the sources I've selected...by the way, did you read the first one which had interviews with Greeks from 2000?) in rebuttal, then you fail to resile from that point you raised which I critiqued. Instead you talk about delays and how confident Jacque Rogge was about Athens preparation. I agree that the IOC was optimistic about the great progress made by the investment of huge sums of money and effort in the 2004 games. But you'd rather change your argument instead of admitting that the Athens 2004 games were under significant peril of collapse. If you can find evidence refuting Samaranch's statements; if he never said it and it was all an invention of CNN, the BBC and Rupert Murdoch, where's your proof?

And as for my pride as an Australian in the Sydney games; I'm happy to cite example after example of how SOCOG and Australia got the 2000 games right. I'm also happy to admit we got things wrong down here. We didn't have the same level of security concerns as Athens did. The ticketing scheme had some serious problems (and I raised them in my previous post). There was an incident where an officiating error lead to Svetlana Khorkhina from Russia failing to register a vault. There was a degree of political infighting within SOCOG, OCA and the NSW Government that at times was rather unsettling. But that was about it. And my personal feelings about Sydney are not just coloured by my nationality; I worked with the organisers for over a year, was a original volunteer even before we won the bid, I met Olympic athletes during the games, spoke with IOC & NOC members at the same time and dealt with non-English speaking media, dealt with issues raised in and outside the Olympic Village, aside from a bucket load of experience and personal knowledge gained through studying the Olympics, investing thousands in tickets as well professional Olympic library, working with media sources outlets such as NHK Japan, and having observed the Olympics since 1972.

I admit; I can't accurately measure the feeling of Greek pride to the nth degree; perhaps you can be more articulate in this area, and again as I asked before support your personal observations with some quantifiable or documentary proof. If it's Greek, fine; although for those of us who can't read the difference between a theta and an omega a translation would be most helpful.

And if you think the Sydney games lacked personality, then that is a shame. Every games have personality, and only the blinkered and the ignorant fail to see that. And frankly, your talk of a 'token aboriginal presence' smacks of racism...making a statement like that without any evidence belittles how important indigenous cultural sensitivities were to all of us involved in the Sydney Olympics.

And by the way...it's Eusebius. Look him up in your history books; as the father of Christian historigraphy and a classic author in Greek, it might be culturally sensitive on your part to actually use correct anglicised spelling.

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Please do not forget that Sydney had her fair share of problems too (between Gosper and tickets etc) and her Olympics lacked personality.  As I am sure that London will in 2012.

Jonno's right. Stupid comment. Stupid because Sydney was fantastic, and stupid because London is seven years away and if you can claim this from looking at what is, at the moment, a patch of muddy grass in East London you're a genius! Also, if you think our world famous existing venues (Wimbledon, Wembley, Lords, Horseguards, the Royal Parks, the Dome, Old Trafford etc.) and passionate and knowledgable sports fans won't lend the games a unique personality, then your definition of "personality" differs to mine.

Perhaps there is more truth in your final comments than you realise. My definition of personality in an Olympic games is culture, and for that reason, Barcelona was fantastic, as I am sure Beijing will. As for Sydney, despite a superbly organised games, I felt that the games lacked personality, an identity (even despite the token aboriginal appearances). I apologise if this qualifies for 'stupid comment' however this is how the games came across to me. Atlanta, same story (but far worse).  And for that reason alone, I was hoping that Paris (or even Moscow and Madrid) would win 2012.  However, perhaps I was too hard on London.  Given that this it is an amazing city, I believe that London organisers can overcome the sedulous and systematic banality that has been dished up be previous Westerns.

Are Paris and Madrid not "Western" cities then?

To be fair, the games are a sporting contest ahead of anything else. Culture will always be important but, unlike sport cannot be measured by the record books and is harder to pin down. However, your preference for Paris or Madrid over London on cultural grounds alone baffles me somewhat.

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Although I do not agree with a lot of what is being written on this topic, as I have indicated in previous posts, I too agree that on a cultural level Barcelona (Madrid), Athens, Beijing and indeed Paris offer an idiosyncratic cultural experience that Atlanta, Sydney or London can not,as they promote a similar cultural perspective that most of us live everyday.  This doesn't mean that as an Olympiad each one doesn't serve a time and place... it is just more interesting to experience new cultural horizons. That is one of the main reasons that I do not want a US or Canadian city to get the 2016 Olympics after London.

And before everyone gets into me about all this, I am not implying one culture is better than the other, but as I live the same experience in Australia as most of you who live in the US, UK and Canada ... it is nice to escape to something completely new and refreshing.  

That is why I believe Istanbul should go for 2016 and we will share in another distinctive cultural experience...

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Although I do not agree with a lot of what is being written on this topic, as I have indicated in previous posts, I too agree that on a cultural level Barcelona (Madrid), Athens, Beijing and indeed Paris offer an idiosyncratic cultural experience that Atlanta, Sydney or London can not,as they promote a similar cultural perspective that most of us live everyday.  This doesn't mean that as an Olympiad each one doesn't serve a time and place... it is just more interesting to experience new cultural horizons. That is one of the main reasons that I do not want a US or Canadian city to get the 2016 Olympics after London.

And before everyone gets into me about all this, I am not implying one culture is better than the other, but as I live the same experience in Australia as most of you who live in the US, UK and Canada ... it is nice to escape to something completely new and refreshing.  

That is why I believe Istanbul should go for 2016 and we will share in another distinctive cultural experience...

Interesting point alexaus...I'm not sure that there is such a thing as a monolithic anglo culture that has defined Atlanta, Sydney and will define London. Even though we speak the same language and have similar pop culture references, Aussies are certainly different to Poms and to Yanks (let alone the extent that multiculturalism has changed all our countries).

But, if one takes Barcelona as a reference point, the specific cultural significance there was vitally different (no better nor worst) than the anglo-triumvirate.. 2016 could well be a good starting point for something culturally 'challenging' (South America/Latino? Russian? Whatever?)

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Face it. You wanted Athens to be a disaster, but unfortunately they weren't.

Atlanta is already history, they could have hosted the 1996 Olympics because of Coca Cola, but people will always remember that the Olympics were born in Greece. And that hurts you!

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Face it. You wanted Athens to be a disaster, but unfortunately they weren't.

Atlanta is already history, they could have hosted the 1996 Olympics because of Coca Cola, but people will always remember that the Olympics were born in Greece. And that hurts you!

come on, this is SO not the answer. nobody - at least not me - wanted athens to be a disaster! the contrary, also because they were the first olympics i attended personally.

its true that athens delivered a wonderful opening ceremony and that everything ran quite smoothly. the volunteers were VERY friendly (even if they didn´t know much in most of the cases:-), but that didn´t really matter to me). so in general the games were organised pretty well.

but its also true that there was a lack of atmosphere. and those empty seats will remain in our memories. it was so sad to see one of the most dramatic finals ever (tennis men´s double) in front of such a few spectators, only because it went until 2.30 h after midnight. and this is just one of many examples i witnessed.

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Face it. You wanted Athens to be a disaster, but unfortunately they weren't.

Atlanta is already history, they could have hosted the 1996 Olympics because of Coca Cola, but people will always remember that the Olympics were born in Greece. And that hurts you!

I certainly had no desire to see Athens be a disaster...I was wrapt when the bid won back in 97, sticking it right up Primo Nebiolo and his conceited push for Rome, loved the hand over sequence in the closing ceremony for Sydney 2000, waited with bated breath for the presentation of the Olympics in its birthplace and finally sat up till 6am more mornings than not during the games loving the sport and enjoying the Greek spin on the games.

It doesn't mean that as someone who's spent over 30 years watching and having a passionate interest in the Olympics I will accept all that is good or all that is bad about every Olympics. Athens had more of both and less of both, depending on the issue and one's perspective.

And as for the hoary old bullshit about Coke winning Atlanta the 96 games...where is your documentation that this happened? Have you got any skerrick of proof that IOC members were influenced corruptly, if at all by Coke? Atlanta's bid for the 96 games was superb, and provided a model of what can be done in the face of a so-called 'front runner'. Hat's off Billy Payne and Charlie Battle.

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In response to the topic,

-Athens was the city that wasn't going to make it

-Waited until last minute to comlpete venues

-Most of the events lacked spectators

-too much negative press

-Pulled it off

-One  of the smallest countries (population & size) to host such an event

-Security was outstanding (especially with the post 911 concerns)

Was it the Best Ever ?

Was it the Worst Ever?

Was it just OK?

The fact is that Athens hosted the OLYMPICS and very few cities in the World hold that title and they should be proud of it.

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Atlanta on paper was ok, but the result?

About the same as Athens.  A lot of good - and a lot of bad.

I'd put Athens above Atlanta in terms of running the games and putting the kibosh on over-commercialization (except of course for the PANASONIC logo that was visible in the stadium when the scoreboard tilted down).

From a legacy standpoint, Atlanta comes out on top.  No, they didn't have that many fancy venues but they played to full houses during the games and have been in constant use since.  And they came out debt free.

It's a matter of one's own personal perspective of what makes a successful Olympics and also, what Olympics you have personally witnessed.  Of the 14 that I have witnessed, Athens was not the worst but are also not the best.

Athens pulled it off somehow and for such a small country, is a source of pride not only for the Greeks but for the IOC.

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A glorious moment in the Golden Games of 1996

Atlanta_Shadows.gif

Atlanta's legacy to Athens.  It showed the Greeks how to be Hellenic and put on great Games.  

Without Atlanta 1996, Athens could NOT have done it as well!!  

Hail Atlanta!  Good follow-up, Athens!

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As one of the younger members here (20 years old) Atlanta is the first Olympics I really remember and I really got into it as a 11-12 year old. I vaguely remember the bombing but I don't think it spoilt my enjoyment of it. Obviously I didn't have anything to compare it to as the older members here will have, and perhaps it wasn't as good as previous games, but as far as I was concerned it was great.
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As one of the younger members here (20 years old) Atlanta is the first Olympics I really remember and I really got into it as a 11-12 year old. I vaguely remember the bombing but I don't think it spoilt my enjoyment of it. Obviously I didn't have anything to compare it to as the older members here will have, and perhaps it wasn't as good as previous games, but as far as I was concerned it was great.

It was GREAT.  Only the churlish and sourgrapes would say otherwise -- that a darkhorse candidate, considered an upstart came out of nowhere and grabbed the biggest prize in the modern Olympics' first 100 years is a testament to, as one of the themes of those Centennial Games goes, the power of the dream and the drive and determination to go after it.  Who cares if it's not one of the pedigreed cities of the world?  It personified the quest of the Olympic dream -- and certainly is now ranked as a driven, get-it-done world-class city.

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there was one negative thing which hasn´t been mentioned yet: the audience... in many cases the spectators really pissed me off. like:

leaving OAKA (thousands!) BEFORE the 100m women finals;

chearing for kenteris and disturbing the athletes in purpose before their start;

being ignorant many times towards amazing achievements of non-greek athletes.

in many cases i got the impression people were not really there for SPORTS. they were there to have a family event and to eat their sunday french fries. no real attention or "emotinal presence", no sensitivity for moments and drama. it seemed to me most of the people didn´t know anything about what was going on/about rules/about who is who etc. it was mostly about the greeks...

no offense. and i know that im generalizing. just my impression. and i was there. guess this was the biggest difference between athens and sydney. sydneysiders massively supported aussies AND all the other atheletes. and they showed strong interest in all kinds of sports.

they were there to have a family event andto eat their sunday french fries.
 

THAT'S A LIE!

We NEVER eat french fries on Sunday! :oh:

oh, ok, i agree. i forgot what they were eating.... :oops: but the point was that maaaany weren´t paying attention at all.

I'll tell you what it was: fruit yoghurt! :wwww:

Thats Olympic Legacy! In which other Olympiad in the past did they sell fruit yoghurt inside the venues? ? ?

I got a fruit yoghurt in a Baseball game and I couldnt pay attention either! It was so delicious!

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there was one negative thing which hasn´t been mentioned yet: the audience... in many cases the spectators really pissed me off. like:

leaving OAKA (thousands!) BEFORE the 100m women finals;

chearing for kenteris and disturbing the athletes in purpose before their start;

being ignorant many times towards amazing achievements of non-greek athletes.

in many cases i got the impression people were not really there for SPORTS. they were there to have a family event and to eat their sunday french fries. no real attention or "emotinal presence", no sensitivity for moments and drama. it seemed to me most of the people didn´t know anything about what was going on/about rules/about who is who etc. it was mostly about the greeks...

no offense. and i know that im generalizing. just my impression. and i was there. guess this was the biggest difference between athens and sydney. sydneysiders massively supported aussies AND all the other atheletes. and they showed strong interest in all kinds of sports.

they were there to have a family event andto eat their sunday french fries.
 

THAT'S A LIE!

We NEVER eat french fries on Sunday! :oh:

oh, ok, i agree. i forgot what they were eating.... :oops: but the point was that maaaany weren´t paying attention at all.

I'll tell you what it was: fruit yoghurt! :wwww:

Thats Olympic Legacy! In which other Olympiad in the past did they sell fruit yoghurt inside the venues? ? ?

I got a fruit yoghurt in a Baseball game and I couldnt pay attention either! It was so delicious!

wellllllll, thats baseball  :laugh:

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As one of the younger members here (20 years old) Atlanta is the first Olympics I really remember and I really got into it as a 11-12 year old. I vaguely remember the bombing but I don't think it spoilt my enjoyment of it. Obviously I didn't have anything to compare it to as the older members here will have, and perhaps it wasn't as good as previous games, but as far as I was concerned it was great.

It was GREAT.  Only the churlish and sourgrapes would say otherwise -- that a darkhorse candidate, considered an upstart came out of nowhere and grabbed the biggest prize in the modern Olympics' first 100 years is a testament to, as one of the themes of those Centennial Games goes, the power of the dream and the drive and determination to go after it.  Who cares if it's not one of the pedigreed cities of the world?  It personified the quest of the Olympic dream -- and certainly is now ranked as a driven, get-it-done world-class city.

Please Baron...isn't this supposed to be a Celine Dion free forum?  :help:

dion.jpg

Notice how in this pic her head goes back...and to the left? Methinks there was a second gunman  :wwww:

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  • 3 weeks later...

We already knew that there was absolutely no plan for the use of the stadiums after the Games.

We had the hope that the new government would speed up things, but unfortunately they focused on other matters (they increased the VAT from 18% to 19%, and now they want to make it 21%, they want to change the 8 working hours per day to 12, they want to change the age for pension to 65 etc), and they couldn't handle the success of the Games for the benefit of Greece.

People don't forget, and when they time comes (elections) they will be punished.

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