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Russian doping: IOC bans Russia from 2018 Winter Olympics

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Ugh. The whole social media is overtaken by russian bots with the silly #NoRussiaNoGames hashtag. To think we're going to have to deal with them until these games are over. 

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On 12/6/2017 at 12:35 AM, AmaniS said:

So what does the OAR uniform look like?

 

I feel sorry for those that will now get metals after cheater are stripped.  There should be some kind of ceremony for those attain metals.  Something during the Olympics. Something that everyone will see, not just those of us that pay attention. They were robbed that also.

Bach said during the press conference that something like that would happen. It seems it's dependent on Russians' appeals going through CAS in time though.

Here's more detail:
https://www.insidethegames.biz/articles/1058870/ioc-hopeful-of-holding-medal-re-allocation-ceremonies-during-pyeongchang-2018

“If we can arrive to a solution and we would have final CAS decisions at this time, we’re planning to organise, together with the IOC Athletes’ Commission, dignified medal ceremonies in Pyeongchang,” said IOC President Thomas Bach.

“We would then, in this case, invite the athletes from the IOC, together with accompanying persons, and would offer them the opportunity to enjoy the Games for a couple of days and also to enjoy the medals ceremonies."

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Even with the IOC-issued Russian Olympic Committee ban last week, many innocent Russian athletes still overwhelmingly want to compete in Pyeongchang this coming February even while having its national Olympic identity stripped from them and not march in the OC instead of boycotting, so says ROC's athletes commission head Sofia Velikaya. Yes, those planned ZA Sport 2018 unis included. And there's a planned list of Russians invited to go by them almost set up that could cause some headaches, and we can still see Russia's all-important hockey teams compete. Even Putin softened his stance on this a bit since and won't stop them from going. Meanwhile, the CAS is looking into 25 Russian athlete registers appeals over their disqualifications...

http://www.cbc.ca/sports/olympics/russian-athletes-winter-olympics-1.4442550

http://www.cbc.ca/sports/olympics/winter/ioc-russia-doping-putin-kremlin-reaction-1.4435041

Since Russians won't be truly banned if proven clean athletes are to be found to form a 2018 team, will VGTRK and Channel One eventually show the Games on TV and online/mobile after all?

http://tass.com/sport/979232

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Pyeongchang 2018: Russia remains banned from Winter Paralympics

 

A final decision on whether Russia can compete at the 2018 Winter Paralympics will be taken in January after the International Paralympic Committee upheld the ban on Tuesday.

Russia was banned from all Paralympic competition by the IPC in August 2016 after revelations of systematic doping.

The IPC governing board said on Tuesday there were still five key measures to be met before Russia's reinstatement.

The Winter Paralympics begin in South Korea on 9 March, 2018.

In December 2016, the IPC created an independent taskforce which set the Russian Paralympic Committee (RPC) a number of conditions that must be met before their athletes can return to competitive disability sport events run by the IPC.

In September, the taskforce highlighted seven key measures that needed to be met before it is able to recommend the reinstatement of the RPC, and in an update on Tuesday, there were still five which had not been satisfied.

The five key measures are:

  • The approval of the RPC's constitution by the IPC membership department.
  • Completion of all budget-related aspects of the reinstatement criteria.
  • The provision and confirmation of certain additional information by the RPC regarding personnel and governance (reinstatement criteria 10 and 14.2), as specified by the taskforce.
  • The full reinstatement of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (Rusada) by the World Anti-Doping Agency (Wada).
  • The provision of an official response specifically and adequately addressing the findings made by Professor McLaren.

In the interim period, Russian athletes can compete as neutrals in qualification events across four sports - alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing and snowboard.

The measure, first announced in September, aims to allow Russia to enter its qualified athletes into the Games should it have its suspension lifted in time.

"As the deadline for athlete entries for Pyeongchang 2018 is 23 February, the IPC Governing Board's next meeting between 26-28 January really is the last chance for Russia to meet the criteria in time for the Games," said new IPC President Andrew Parsons.

"Although the IPC Governing Board continues to be impressed at the level of co-operation and progress made so far by the RPC, it is united in its decision to maintain the suspension as the reinstatement criteria have not yet been met in full.

"The RPC is making headway with the IPC on three of the five remaining reinstatement criteria, however sadly, and much to our growing disappointment and frustration, there is a lack of progress regarding an official response from the Russian authorities specifically and adequately addressing the McLaren findings and evidence."

 

http://www.bbc.com/sport/disability-sport/42423134

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They did. Russia is also banned from the WOG. Though we all know they did because WADA pressed them to do it.

http://www.bbc.com/sport/winter-olympics/42423576

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Russian Olympic athletes warned not to dress like flag

Russian athletes taking part at the Winter Olympics as neutral competitors have been warned not to replicate their country's flag via their kit.

"Separate items of clothing cannot create a tricolour" is one of 13 International Olympic Committee stipulations.

The Russian emblem and coat of arms is not permitted on kit with a generic text proposed to replace it.

Russia is banned after allegations of systematic doping at Sochi 2014.

_99298126_2017-12-20-oar-logo-01.jpg

The country, which was blocked from sending a full team to Rio 2016, has been accused of operating a state-sponsored regime that included tailored drugs programmes and urine samples being switched.

Individual athletes can still compete providing they can meet anti-doping criteria.

The IOC stipulate that athletes' kit can only carry the words 'Olympic athlete from Russia' or 'OAR', while officials' clothing can only feature 'OAR'.

And the uniforms cannot consist of all three colours of the Russian flag, while the red and blue cannot match the shade used in the flag - the IOC suggests "that these are darker in colour".

The 2018 Winter Games, which will be staged in Pyeongchang in South Korea, start on 9 February.

 

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So if they wear that patch and an all blue they would have their countries colors while being in regulations. 

I am still not sure why it it is OAR and not just Olympic Athlete or Independent Olympic Athlete.  Did they have a general name for refugees last games?

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A final decision will be made in January. And lets be honest, one can't bar all the russian athletes when many of them are clean (as long as they prove they're clean of course). However maybe this humilliation might help raise concern on the inside. Either way I doubt Russia will host any Olympics in a long, long, long time.

http://www.bbc.com/sport/winter-sports/42460435

And also 11 more athletes got banned. And I thought Armstrong cheating was bad. 

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The mercenary-I mean, Viktor Ahn (the infamous South Korean skater who won 3 golds for his country in Torino, then defected to Russia in 2014 to win 3 golds for them) was also kicked out from PC2018 because of being mentioned in the Lauren report

http://www.straitstimes.com/sport/winter-olympics-russia-short-track-star-viktor-ahn-barred-from-2018-games

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33 minutes ago, Ikarus360 said:

The mercenary-I mean, Viktor Ahn (the infamous South Korean skater who won 3 golds for his country in Torino, then defected to Russia in 2014 to win 3 golds for them) was also kicked out from PC2018 because of being mentioned in the Lauren report

http://www.straitstimes.com/sport/winter-olympics-russia-short-track-star-viktor-ahn-barred-from-2018-games

A pity. I’m sure the home crowd would have given him a warm welcome.

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The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) announced on Monday (29 January) that it is maintaining the suspension of the Russian Paralympic Committee (RPC). However, in recognition of the progress made by the RPC in improving its anti-doping activities, it will allow eligible Russian Para athletes who meet strict conditions to compete in five sports under the name Neutral Paralympic Athlete (NPA) at the PyeongChang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games.

The IPC Governing Board decided to maintain the suspension after receiving an update on Saturday (27 January) from the IPC Taskforce responsible for monitoring the RPC’s progress in meeting the reinstatement criteria. The IPC Taskforce highlighted two criteria that are still outstanding:

• The full reinstatement of the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA) by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

• The provision of an official response specifically and adequately addressing the findings made by Professor McLaren.

Following the decision to maintain the suspension, the IPC Governing Board discussed at length whether to allow Russian Para athletes to compete as neutrals at the PyeongChang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games.

After acknowledging the steps the RPC has taken to improve its governance and anti-doping procedures and practices, the IPC Governing Board determined that eligible Russian Para athletes that meet strict conditions should be allowed to compete at PyeongChang 2018. Para athletes will be allowed to compete in alpine skiing, biathlon, cross-country skiing, snowboard and wheelchair curling. Under the sport rules for Para ice hockey, an NPA team could not be considered as Russia had missed the opportunity to qualify.

...

https://www.paralympic.org/news/neutral-paralympic-athletes-compete-pyeongchang-2018

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The saga continues. But this time is CAS being spineless fools. This is going to hurt the Olympics reputation more than it already is. But at least they're still banned from PC.

http://www.bbc.com/sport/winter-olympics/42901377

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Winter Olympics 2018: Court overturns life bans given to Russian athletes

A decision to overturn the Olympic life bans of 28 Russian athletes "may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping", says the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) overturned the IOC suspensions - for doping at the 2014 Winter Olympics - partially upholding 11 other appeals.

Cas said that in 28 cases evidence was "insufficient" to prove doping.

The IOC said it would consider its own appeal to the Swiss Federal Tribunal.

Cas said that for the 11 athletes whose appeals had been partially upheld, evidence "was sufficient to establish an anti-doping rule violation" had taken place.

It said they would be "declared ineligible" for this month's Games "instead of a life ban from all Olympic Games".

The IOC said that the Cas ruling "does not mean that athletes from the group of 28 will be invited" to this month's Games in Pyeongchang.

It expressed its "satisfaction on one hand and disappointment on the other" at Thursday's decision, made eight days before the 2018 Winter Olympics begin in South Korea.

"On the one hand, the confirmation of the anti-doping rule violations for 11 athletes because of the manipulation of their samples clearly demonstrates once more the existence of the systemic manipulation of the anti-doping system at Sochi 2014," a statement added.

"On the other hand, the IOC regrets very much that - according to the Cas press release - the panels did not take this proven existence of the systemic manipulation of the anti-doping system into consideration for the other 28 cases.

"This may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping.

"Therefore, the IOC will analyse the reasoned decisions very carefully once they are available and consider consequences, including an appeal to the Swiss Federal Tribunal."

Britain in line for another bronze?

The Cas decision makes it likely that Britain's four-man bobsleigh team from Sochi will be upgraded to a bronze medal.

John James Jackson, Bruce Tasker, Stuart Benson and Joel Fearon finished fifth, but the IOC disqualified two Russian sleds who finished first and fourth following re-examination of the doping tests conducted at the time.

Athletes from both Russian sleds were included in the 11 whose doping violations were confirmed by Cas.

The IOC is yet to officially reallocate the medals from that event, but if confirmed it would raise Britain's medal count to five and make Sochi 2014 their most successful Winter Olympics.

Jackson told BBC Sport: "Do I feel like an Olympic bronze medallist? I think it's starting to sink in, but I think once we have the medal it will feel more real.

"It's been a long waiting game since the McLaren report came out to get to a decision. I wasn't expecting the final outcome of the 28 appeals being upheld, but always thought a life-time ban wouldn't be upheld either way."

 

Analysis

BBC sports editor Dan Roan

Once again, just as in Rio two years ago, the Olympic movement is in chaos on the eve of its showpiece event.

The IOC had already received huge criticism for banning Russia, but then allowing as many as 169 athletes to compete as neutrals, but with the word 'Russia' emblazoned on their kit.

The Cas decision now means that the 28 Russian athletes who have had their bans overturned could take legal action against the IOC and fight to be allowed to join their compatriots in Pyeongchang, along with many others excluded from the Olympics, causing last-minute havoc.

At a time when there are fresh concerns that the new-generation bottles used to collect samples could be tampered with, this will be seen as yet another blow for anti-doping, undermining the entire case built against Russia for state-sponsored doping, and fuelling those who portray the scandal as a Western conspiracy.

However, many will wonder why the IOC issued these lifetime bans in the first place when legal precedent shows that such sanctions are always doomed to fail once appealed.

 

'A get out of jail free card'

Cas said it considered testimony from experts including former Russian anti-doping official and whistleblower Dr Grigory Rodchenkov and Canadian lawyer Professor Richard McLaren, who authored a damning 2016 reportinto doping in Russia.

A statement from Dr Rodchenkov's lawyers said: "This panel's unfortunate decision provides a very small measure of punishment for some athletes but a complete 'get out of jail free card' for most.

"The Cas decision only emboldens cheaters, makes it harder for clean athletes to win, and provides yet another ill-gotten gain for the corrupt Russian doping system generally, and [President Vladimir] Putin specifically.

"Clean sport is dead. The Cas decision proves that certain countries can get away with anything and everything. Today's decision will forever stand as the low point in sports integrity."

How many Russians were banned and why?

In total 43 Russians were banned for life from the Olympics following the conclusion of an IOC investigation into evidence of state-sponsored Russian doping at their home Games in Sochi in 2014.

Bobsleigher Maxim Belugin was the only athlete not to lodge an appeal with Cas, while three other cases - biathletes Olga Zaytseva, Olga Vilukhina and Yana Romanova - have been "suspended".

The IOC investigation - known as the Oswald Commission, tasked with looking into individual cases of doping - was opened following the findings of the McLaren report.

The McLaren report said Russian athletes benefited from a state-sponsored doping programme between 2011 and 2015, speaking of "a cover-up that evolved from uncontrolled chaos to an institutionalised and disciplined medal-winning conspiracy".

The IOC also set up another investigative body - the Schmid Commission - to investigate this wider evidence of institutional doping.

As a result it banned Russia from competing in Pyeongchang, but 169 Russians have since been invited to take part as neutrals.

'A puzzle' and 'circumstantial evidence'

In November, the IOC described the "puzzle" of investigating something that was "by nature and purpose elusive" as it published decisions explaining its first wave of Russian bans.

With reference to Alexander Legkov, one of two Russian skiers banned on 1 November, the IOC said the athlete had "sought to argue that no evidence could be drawn from the McLaren report" but it had "come to a different conclusion".

It said that the authority of the report's findings was "unquestionable" and it "can and will rely" on its findings.

Legkov is one of the 28 athletes whose suspensions were overturned by Cas on Thursday.

In the statement explaining its decision, Cas said its mandate "was not to determine generally whether there was an organised scheme allowing the manipulation of doping control samples in the Sochi laboratory".

It said it was "strictly limited to dealing with 39 individual cases and to assess the evidence applicable to each athlete on an individual basis".

Cas secretary general Matthieu Reeb said there was only "circumstantial evidence" that supported individual claims of doping.

He added: "It is a matter where there is no direct evidence, such as positive test or a voluntary admission.

"This does not mean that the 28 athletes are declared innocent, but due to insufficient evidence the appeals are upheld, the sanctions annulled and their results in Sochi are reinstated."

'We expect to compete' - reaction in Russia

By BBC Monitoring

Russian Sports Minister Pavel Kolobkov said: "Our guys and all of us are happy that justice has finally triumphed. Today's rulings confirm that many of those who were accused are clean athletes."

The Interfax news agency quoted Russian Olympic Committee head Alexander Zhukov as saying: "We are simply happy now that the court has restored the athletes' good name and returned their awards."

Interfax also quoted Kolobkov as saying: "The athletes who fought for their rights have finally won, and are, naturally, happy and looking forward to continuing their careers.

"They expect the International Olympics Committee to accept the Cas ruling and allow them unconditional rights to take part in the upcoming Olympic games."

Alexander Zubkov, president of the Russian bobsleigh federation, Sochi gold medallist and one of 11 athletes confirmed to have committed a doping offence, told Reuters he was "partly satisfied" with the decision as "a large number of athletes were exonerated".

But he was puzzled as to why he was not among them, adding: "I have said many times that I have never doped and do not dope now. What am I being accused of? What anti-doping rule violation do they want to slap against me?"

 

Quote

Winter Olympics 2018: Cas Russia ruling 'craven and spineless' - IOC member

Sports leaders have been accused of making "craven and spineless" decisions, after life bans given to Russian athletes were overturned.

British International Olympic Committee (IOC) member Adam Pengilly told BBC Sport he was "appalled and angry" after the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) overturned the suspensions of 28 Russians for doping, and partially upheld 11 other appeals.

"It is a desperate and dark day for sport, with cheats and thieves allowed to triumph," said Pengilly.

Cas said evidence was "insufficient" to prove doping in 28 cases, though the IOC insisted the ruling did not mean the athletes would be invited to this month's Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, where 169 of their compatriots are being allowed to compete as neutrals after the country was officially banned.

"Cas has failed here," said Pengilly, a former skeleton athlete who is also vice-president of the International Bobsleigh and Skeleton Federation (IBSF).

"We need to take a long, hard look at sport's leading administrators and sport's legal system when we see the greatest fraud at an Olympic Games and years of institutional doping conspiracy pass by with only minor punishment.

"The silent and clean majority are being made to suffer through having to attain a ridiculous burden of proof and by the craven and spineless decisions of those who lead."

'Avoid elite sport like the plague'

Last year, 43 Russians were banned for life after an IOC investigation into state-sponsored doping at their home Sochi Games in 2014.

The Oswald Commission, tasked with looking into individual cases of doping, was opened following the findings of the World Anti-Doping Agency's McLaren report.

It concluded Russian athletes benefited from a state-sponsored doping programme between 2011 and 2015, speaking of "a cover-up that evolved from uncontrolled chaos to an institutionalised and disciplined medal-winning conspiracy".

"Today I have found myself apologising to individual athletes who have had dreams, medals, money and most importantly, faith in sport, stolen from them," said Pengilly, the only IOC member to publicly oppose the IOC executive board's stance on Russia's inclusion in the Rio 2016 Olympics.

"They now think that you are better off cheating or getting your nation to establish a doping system because even if it is discovered, the consequences are minimal. Or, if you don't want to cheat, avoid elite sport like the plague."

In reaching its decision, Cas said it considered testimony from experts including former Russian anti-doping official and whistleblower Dr Grigory Rodchenkov and Canadian lawyer Professor Richard McLaren, who authored a damning 2016 report into doping in Russia.

Pengilly added: "When McLaren and the Oswald Commission regard Rodchenkov's evidence as credible and truthful, and it is backed up by forensic evidence, yet Cas obviously don't accept it, what more do you have to do?"

Usada switches blame back to IOC

Rodchenkov's lawyers criticised the decision, stating "clean sport is dead".

The IOC said the decision by Cas "may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping", while the US Anti-Doping Agency focused the blame back on the IOC, calling the situation a "sorry mess".

Its chief executive, Travis Tygart, said: "The IOC's failure to swiftly and decisively deal with Russia's unprecedented attack on fair play has eroded public trust in the values of the Olympic movement.

"Slamming dozens of cases through the process on the eve of the Olympic Games has not served justice and as such the integrity of the Games has been sabotaged.

"The whole sorry mess truly stinks and the nightmare continues for clean athletes. This must change."

How did Cas arrive at a decision?

Russia's sports minister Pavel Kolobkov said "justice has finally triumphed", insisting those who were accused of doping were "clean athletes".

Cas said its mandate was not to "determine generally whether there was an organised scheme allowing the manipulation of doping control samples in the Sochi laboratory".

Instead it said it was "strictly limited to dealing with 39 individual cases and to assess the evidence applicable to each athlete on an individual basis".

The body's secretary general, Matthieu Reeb, said there was only "circumstantial evidence" that supported individual claims of doping.

He added: "It is a matter where there is no direct evidence, such as positive test or a voluntary admission.

"This does not mean that the 28 athletes are declared innocent, but due to insufficient evidence the appeals are upheld, the sanctions annulled and their results in Sochi are reinstated."

'A confused judgment'

World Anti-Doping Agency president Sir Craig Reedie said he had "serious concerns" about the Cas decision.

He told BBC Radio 5 live the judgment was "confused" because 11 athletes had not been fully exonerated.

"By so doing, Cas must recognise there was an institutionalised conspiracy going on," he said. "The institutionalised conspiracy must have applied to the other 28 as to the 11".

He added: "It's not good news because it creates confusion and it creates dismay in the minds of all the clean athletes who have been affected by this institutionalised conspiracy that has been going on in Russia for years."

 

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It‘s a sad sad farce and the IOC with its spineless behaviour, brown-nosing the Zsar, dug its own grave there. 

 

That said, one wonders what they have been smoking at the CAS...

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Maybe Russia has taught us a valuable life lesson; sliding down hills on your arse in the cold isn't to be taken too seriously.

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Welp. You had one job, IOC.... 

Quote

Winter Olympics: Alexander Krushelnitsky subject of anti-doping case

_100084274_krushelnitsky_getty.jpg

An anti-doping case has been opened against Russian medal-winning curler Alexander Krushelnitsky, says the Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas).

Krushelnitsky, who won bronze with his wife in the mixed doubles at the Winter Olympics on Tuesday, is suspected of testing positive for meldonium.

Cas opened a case against the 25-year-old following a request from the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

A hearing date has not been set and a B sample result is expected on Monday.

More than 160 competitors are in the Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) team as their country was banned from the Games over "systemic" doping at Sochi 2014, which they hosted.

Russian athletes who could prove they are clean could compete under the OAR banner, with the team comprising 168 competitors - the third biggest behind Canada and the United States.

"It's a huge embarrassment for the IOC, given it let OAR compete," said BBC commentator Steve Cram.

The Reuters news agency originally confirmed the identity of the athlete with a Russian Olympic delegation spokesman.

A spokesman for the IOC said it would be "extremely disappointing for us if a case is proven".

An IOC statement added: "Doping, testing and sanctioning at the Olympic Winter Games Pyeongchang 2018 is independent from the IOC. Therefore the IOC cannot communicate on individual cases while the procedure is ongoing."

The BBC understands Krushelnitsky - who won bronze alongside Anastasia Bryzgalova as part of the neutral OAR team - has left the Pyeongchang 2018 village and is in Seoul awaiting the result of the test on the B sample, which is expected later on Monday.

Meldonium, a substance that increases blood flow and improves exercise capacity, was banned in 2016.

Russian curling federation president Dmitry Svishchev confirmed to Reuters that the team's curlers had been tested on 22 January, before flying out to South Korea, and that the tests returned then were negative.

"I have known these guys for many years," Svishchev said. "Only a crazy person takes banned substances before a competition, before the Olympics.

"It's a strange story. It raises a lot of questions."

In a statement released on Monday, the IOC insisted there was "a strong testing programme" in place at the Games.

It added: "On the one hand it is extremely disappointing when prohibitive substances may have been used, but on the other hand it shows the effectiveness of the anti-doping system at the Games, which protects the rights of all clean athletes."

'A huge embarrassment for the IOC' - analysis

Steve Cram, BBC curling commentator:

"It is a piece of shocking news. Curling is not a sport you associate with doping.

"People shouldn't assume curling isn't a physical sport, especially mixed curling. They train hard in the gym just like every athlete - but it's also a sport of concentration."

Alex Capstick, BBC Sport in Pyeongchang:

"IOC spokesman Mark Adams said the B sample is likely to be analysed on Monday at a laboratory in Seoul. It is rare that a second test gives a different result to the first.

"The substance involved is believed to be meldonium, a drug banned since January 2016 but sold over the counter in many eastern European countries.

"Mr Adams defended the pre-Games anti-doping programme, which he said targeted Russian competitors significantly more than those from other countries.

"He said if a doping violation was proved then it would be taken into consideration when deciding whether Russia's Olympic ban would be lifted in time for the closing ceremony."

'It's very hard to believe' - Russia reaction

Members of the OAR curling squad say they are shocked by Krushelnitsky's positive test and believe he is innocent of doping.

"It's stupid, but Alexander is not stupid, so I don't believe it," said women's curling coach Sergei Belanov.

Russian curler Viktoria Moiseeva said the team all hope it is "some kind of mistake".

"With us it's not faster, higher, stronger; it's about being more accurate," she said. "I can't imagine what kind of drugs you could use in curling, so it's very hard to believe."

The OAR team had been hoping good behaviour at Pyeonghang would persuade the IOC to allow them to use the Russian flag and wear national uniform at the closing ceremony on 25 February.

Moiseeva added she was worried the case could harm Russia's chances of regaining fully Olympic status.

"It's a catastrophe. If it's not just one Olympics but others too it will throw sport in our country into turmoil," she said. "It's awful just to think about."

 

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