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8 hours ago, dchang11 said:

Nothing is going to top the Muhammad Ali moment in 1996. LA2028 will choose someone that everyone will approve. 

I disagree.  That was the MOST pathetic, BORING, wasted Lighting of a cauldron.  I DID NOT agree with that.  The Olympics are supposed to be all that is youthful and zestful; and who did they pick -- the doddering LOUDMOUTH, notthing but a shadow of himself.  

The Lighting @ Salt Lake by a whole team was MESSY.  I would have given it to Eric Heiden -- won FIVE GOLD MEDALS all by himself -- NOT by a combined effort of 12 people!!

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City of Champions stadium. It's got the best initials ever imo. It will be built in Inglewood and host the OC and CC. 

And what is Alan Abrahamson about my comment? Is it about Caitlyn? It's only a fact most of the LGBT community does not like that twat because she continues to be a republican and support republican p

LA 2024 = Kobe Bryant #24 of the LA Lakers seemed like a no brainer. He turned Staples Center into the globally recognized venue it is today. That or Venus and Serena Williams LA 2028 = Venu

3 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

I disagree.  That was the MOST pathetic, BORING, wasted Lighting of a cauldron.  I DID NOT agree with that.  The Olympics are supposed to be all that is youthful and zestful; and who did they pick -- the doddering LOUDMOUTH, notthing but a shadow of himself.  

The Lighting @ Salt Lake by a whole team was MESSY.  I would have given it to Eric Heiden -- won FIVE GOLD MEDALS all by himself -- NOT by a combined effort of 12 people!!

It's about the emotion. I doubt Eric Heiden is as well known as the 1980 Hockey team. That moment was iconic. Same thing with Ali, it's the emotion that mattered. 

The lighting of the cauldron is supposed to be the emotional climax of a two hour emotional ceremony. LA is going to pick someone that will move the audience and the nation. 

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I thought Muhammad Ali was a great person to light the cauldron for 1996.  He was a medal-winning athlete and anti-war and civil rights activist.  Perfect for Atlanta '96.  

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Guys, don't bother arguing with baron about Atlanta.  He detests Muhammad Ali and everything he stands for.  He hates the person more than he hates the moment even though I agree with the majority opinion that it was a wonderful scene and an indelible image.

I'm with bernham that torch lighting and the choice of the final torchbearer should be iconic.  This being the United States, there are many good choices.  Phelps, Carl Lewis, the Williams sisters, Mary Lou Retton.  Almost feel like there are too many good athletes out there that there's only so many opportunities in the stadium that someone by default will get left out.

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7 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

The Lighting @ Salt Lake by a whole team was MESSY.  I would have given it to Eric Heiden -- won FIVE GOLD MEDALS all by himself -- NOT by a combined effort of 12 people!!

It's been brought up before that Heiden tends to get lost in history because of the hockey gold.  Which is a shame because the United States won 6 golds in Lake Placid but there's 1 people remember more than the other 5 that belong to 1 guy.  That said, Salt Lake happened just a few months after 9/11 so they may have been looking for something different.  Can't entire fault them for trying to bring to light that moment to represent the lighting of the flame that year.

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5 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

It's been brought up before that Heiden tends to get lost in history because of the hockey gold.  Which is a shame because the United States won 6 golds in Lake Placid but there's 1 people remember more than the other 5 that belong to 1 guy.  That said, Salt Lake happened just a few months after 9/11 so they may have been looking for something different.  Can't entire fault them for trying to bring to light that moment to represent the lighting of the flame that year.

Yeah, it was a popular choice of Dick Ebersole, producer Don Mischer (and Romney just kinda rubber-stamped it).  Actually, Heiden had been offered the post beside Bonnie Blair; but Heiden bluntly told NBC that he should have the honor to light the cauldron.  It was all or nothing for him.  Ebersole, Mischer and Romney didn't budge; their minds about the Hockey team was made up.  So Heiden said he'd have nothing to do with it. His spot in the earlier hand-offs was then given to Dan Jansen.  But Heiden still stayed on as team doctor for the US speed-skating team 2002 / 2006 Games.  

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  • 5 months later...

I also agree, it should be iconic. While there are many athletes that we would love to choose because we remember them, I'm not too sure the international community will be as receptive. It needs to be someone iconic, someone that people both in the USA and abroad will be in awe when they figure out who will light the torch. I would not be surprised if it were Phelps, anyone from the Dream Team in 1992, the Williams Sisters, or Carl Lewis. My bets will be on Phelps or Carl Lewis, with the latter being my #1. There is a very good chance the Summer Olympics could make it back to the East Coast somewhere within Phelp's lifetime, so they may save him for later. If Germany can actually follow through and actually bid with their regional bid in 2032, there is no reason why there can't be a DC/Baltimore bid in the future, which would be ideal for Phelps. 

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58 minutes ago, anthonyliberatori said:

I also agree, it should be iconic. While there are many athletes that we would love to choose because we remember them, I'm not too sure the international community will be as receptive. It needs to be someone iconic, someone that people both in the USA and abroad will be in awe when they figure out who will light the torch. I would not be surprised if it were Phelps, anyone from the Dream Team in 1992, the Williams Sisters, or Carl Lewis. My bets will be on Phelps or Carl Lewis, with the latter being my #1. There is a very good chance the Summer Olympics could make it back to the East Coast somewhere within Phelp's lifetime, so they may save him for later. If Germany can actually follow through and actually bid with their regional bid in 2032, there is no reason why there can't be a DC/Baltimore bid in the future, which would be ideal for Phelps. 

2 things..

1) There are still many reasons why a DC/Baltimore bid likely won't happen.  It's been tried before.  What happens in Germany probably won't help matters for them.

2) Even if that happens down the line, that's a reason to exclude Phelps because there's a "very good chance" of another Olympics on the East coast of the US.  If that happens, great.  But not a smart idea to plan ahead like that.  If they want Phelps, get Phelps.  No reason to wait for when it would be ideal considering it could be another 30-40 years down the line before that's even an option.

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4 minutes ago, Quaker2001 said:

2 things..

1) There are still many reasons why a DC/Baltimore bid likely won't happen.  It's been tried before.  What happens in Germany probably won't help matters for them.

2) Even if that happens down the line, that's a reason to exclude Phelps because there's a "very good chance" of another Olympics on the East coast of the US.  If that happens, great.  But not a smart idea to plan ahead like that.  If they want Phelps, get Phelps.  No reason to wait for when it would be ideal considering it could be another 30-40 years down the line before that's even an option.

That's true, I didn't say he was unlikely. I actually said he and Carl Lewis were both my #1 choices. Still, even without an East Coast Olympics, I would still lean towards Carl Lewis. Think about timing. Muhammad Ali lit the cauldron in Atlanta in 1996, over 30 years after winning the gold in Rome 1960. The USA 1980 Gold  Medal team lit the cauldron in Salt Lake in 2002, over 30 years after their Gold. Even Rafer Johnson from LA 1984 had over 20 years between his Olympic titles and his cauldron lighting. 2028 is only 12 years off of 2016, where Phelps won the last of his gold medals, and even so, 20 years from Beijing, 16 years from London. Carl Lewis has 44 years in between his glory days at the Olympics, AT this Olympics, and would likely be an awe-moment for many people. So in terms of time, Carl Lewis would still have my vote over Phelps. 

 

However, many more people would likely known Phelps. He would be more expected that way though, so the excitement wouldn't be as grand, but he would speak to the international community and the Olympic movement as a whole. So I think both of them have a decent shot. We can't really go wrong with either.

 

And also, out of curiosity, what are some reasons you think DC/Baltimore wouldn't work? The security threats are a given, but with the new Metro, highway, airport, and hotel expansions, could DC/Baltimore, or just DC, be capable of hosting an Olympics sometime down the line?

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22 minutes ago, anthonyliberatori said:

That's true, I didn't say he was unlikely. I actually said he and Carl Lewis were both my #1 choices. Still, even without an East Coast Olympics, I would still lean towards Carl Lewis. Think about timing. Muhammad Ali lit the cauldron in Atlanta in 1996, over 30 years after winning the gold in Rome 1960. The USA 1980 Gold  Medal team lit the cauldron in Salt Lake in 2002, over 30 years after their Gold. Even Rafer Johnson from LA 1984 had over 20 years between his Olympic titles and his cauldron lighting. 2028 is only 12 years off of 2016, where Phelps won the last of his gold medals, and even so, 20 years from Beijing, 16 years from London. Carl Lewis has 44 years in between his glory days at the Olympics, AT this Olympics, and would likely be an awe-moment for many people. So in terms of time, Carl Lewis would still have my vote over Phelps. 

However, many more people would likely known Phelps. He would be more expected that way though, so the excitement wouldn't be as grand, but he would speak to the international community and the Olympic movement as a whole. So I think both of them have a decent shot. We can't really go wrong with either.

I'm with you on Lewis over Phelps.  I think it should be someone with ties to Southern California and they aren't lacking for people who fit that bill, Lewis included.  I just don't like the idea of "let's save Phelps because there might be an East coast Olympics in his lifetime."  Yes, he's the all-time medal winner and should have a prominent place in the Opening Ceremony.  But if we're talking about the final torch-bearer, I don't know Phelps is the run-away obvious choice.  It's not like Lewis will be so far removed from his career that people won't know who he is.  More accurately.. it's 32 years since he last competed, not 44.  He did win a gold medal in Atlanta, after all.  Again, either way, there's the 2 of them plus others (i.e. the Williams sisters) where you can't go wrong.

28 minutes ago, anthonyliberatori said:

And also, out of curiosity, what are some reasons you think DC/Baltimore wouldn't work? The security threats are a given, but with the new Metro, highway, airport, and hotel expansions, could DC/Baltimore, or just DC, be capable of hosting an Olympics sometime down the line?

You mean other than the fact they couldn't beat a very flawed Boston bid?  And then got passed over for Los Angeles?

The biggest issue a bid will always face is that congress has jurisdiction over all matters involving Washington DC.  So that creates an issue where federal funding is involved.  If they're as well funded as LA is, that's a different story.  But it would be very easy for the powers that be to scupper a DC bid if it started to get serious.  Plus, you talk about infrastructure improvements, but what about a stadium?  An Olympic village?  Where are these things going to pop up to make an Olympic bid an attractive proposal?

Also, be careful of semantics here.  A number of cities in the U.S. could be "capable" of hosting an Olympics.  The likelihood of some of those cities being selected, let alone having the means to create a proposal that might be selected, is somewhat more limited.  That's why I'm never a fan of the argument includes "there is no reason why this can't happen."  No.. the argument that needs to be made is "why could it happen," not to disprove a "why it can't happen."

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Just now, Quaker2001 said:

I'm with you on Lewis over Phelps.  I think it should be someone with ties to Southern California and they aren't lacking for people who fit that bill, Lewis included.  I just don't like the idea of "let's save Phelps because there might be an East coast Olympics in his lifetime."  Yes, he's the all-time medal winner and should have a prominent place in the Opening Ceremony.  But if we're talking about the final torch-bearer, I don't know Phelps is the run-away obvious choice.  It's not like Lewis will be so far removed from his career that people won't know who he is.  More accurately.. it's 32 years since he last competed, not 44.  He did win a gold medal in Atlanta, after all.  Again, either way, there's the 2 of them plus others (i.e. the Williams sisters) where you can't go wrong.

Forgot about him in Atlanta 1996! My bad.

1 minute ago, Quaker2001 said:

You mean other than the fact they couldn't beat a very flawed Boston bid?  And then got passed over for Los Angeles?

The biggest issue a bid will always face is that congress has jurisdiction over all matters involving Washington DC.  So that creates an issue where federal funding is involved.  If they're as well funded as LA is, that's a different story.  But it would be very easy for the powers that be to scupper a DC bid if it started to get serious.  Plus, you talk about infrastructure improvements, but what about a stadium?  An Olympic village?  Where are these things going to pop up to make an Olympic bid an attractive proposal?

Also, be careful of semantics here.  A number of cities in the U.S. could be "capable" of hosting an Olympics.  The likelihood of some of those cities being selected, let alone having the means to create a proposal that might be selected, is somewhat more limited.  That's why I'm never a fan of the argument includes "there is no reason why this can't happen."  No.. the argument that needs to be made is "why could it happen," not to disprove a "why it can't happen."

The Redskins stadium holds 82,000, and could easily be used for the Ceremonies and Soccer finals. Would be harder to find a track for the DC Olympics, but the Redskins stadium could possibly be fitted for a track, I'm not all too familiar with it. Plus there are many colleges nearby that could hold the track events, as well as be the home of the Olympic village. DC already has many of the venues, they would just be all over the place.That would make the bid rather scattered, making the proposal not ideal.But with that, it is already placed under other cities in the USOC's mind, before we even get into politics, literally and figuratively. 

 

But I'm with you on that. Hell, almost any major city in the USA could likely put something together. But it doesn't mean they have to. I'm holding out for another Atlanta-like bid from Baltimore, Dallas, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, or Boston. Something that is based around already in-place urban renewal projects, is based around venues with primary AND secondary legacy plans, all with the focus of leaving a lasting memory in the city that isn't necessarily athletic. Yes, Atlanta did have its flaws, but the city was left with an improved airport, infrastructure, doubled their amount of hotel rooms, an increased population, and a huge surplus of business, particularly international business. Not to mention the beautiful downtown area with Centennial Park, laying the foundation of the World of Coke museum and becoming the epicenter for the new downtown, as well as a new stadium for the Braves, and new dorm rooms and a recreation center for Georgia Tech. I personally don't think any USA city will be able to make it past a Los Angeles bid of solely existing venues unless they have a focus like Atlanta did, nor would I support it to be honest. Cities like the ones I listed above could very well have that possibility, but again, it's a matter of, like you said "WHY it could". However, I don't see too much motivation in any of those cities right now to undertake a large urban project like that. A man can surely hope though. 

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  • 7 months later...

The "Official" but NOT-quite complete documentary of the 1984 Torch Relay.  The behind-the-scene story of Samaranch and Ueberroth "stealing", like Prometheus, the flame from the Greeks (ha! hubris!) , of course, is NOT told in this version.  

OMG! That's Audrey Hepburn (in the white outfit) @ the 25:35 mark.  Robert Wolders, her partner at the time, is to her right; and the young boy on the right, is her son, Luca.  

 

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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On 8/29/2018 at 10:51 AM, baron-pierreIV said:

The "Official" but NOT-quite complete documentary of the 1984 Torch Relay.  The behind-the-scene story of Samaranch and Ueberroth "stealing", like Prometheus, the flame from the Greeks (ha! hubris!) , of course, is NOT told in this version.  

OMG! That's Audrey Hepburn (in the white outfit) @ the 25:35 mark.  Robert Wolders, her partner at the time, is to her right; and the young boy on the right, is her son, Luca.  

 

And OJ Simpson just after that taking the torch up in Santa Monica it looks like. Wild. Love the 80s feel to the whole thing, definitely a captures it well.

I really enjoyed one line in particular, because I feel that it really resonates to current day America.

"There is something out there in America that was waiting for something like this to happen... there was some spirit. I don't know what it is, some  think it was patriotism, I think it was more than that. They thank you for coming, it was something that needed to be unleashed."



 

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/\/\  Yea, I purposely IGNORED OJ's presence in that.  He does NOT deserve any footnotes in history.   But I was hoping to not see Bruce, errr.... Cailtin Jenner already running the torch in her high heels!  Tee-hee.  

I love the shot of the cool tabby cat who seemed totally oblivious of the commotion but was curious nonetheless.  And I think that's also actor and Brigidier General in the US Air Force Reserve Jimmy Stewart just BEFORE Audrey Hepburn came on.  

But then, 1984 was duplicated in 1996 and 2002.  I'm proposing that for 2028, they take it to Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii somehow -- so indeed, it will be "From sea to shining sea."  

Of course, we all shouldn't forget that this is a pagan symbol and the ritual was conceived and created  by the Nazis.  

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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6 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

/\/\  Yea, I purposely IGNORED OJ's presence in that.  He does NOT deserve any footnotes in history.   But I was hoping to not see Bruce, errr.... Cailtin Jenner already running the torch in her high heels!  Tee-hee.  

I love the shot of the cool tabby cat who seemed totally oblivious of the commotion but was curious nonetheless.  And I think that's also actor and Brigidier General in the US Air Force Reserve Jimmy Stewart just BEFORE Audrey Hepburn came on.  

But then, 1984 was duplicated in 1996 and 2002.  I'm proposing that for 2028, they take it to Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii somehow -- so indeed, it will be "From sea to shining sea."  

Of course, we all shouldn't forget that this is a pagan symbol and the ritual was conceived and created  by the Nazis.  

It would be nice to have it reach all 50 States + Puerto Rico. I hate that it was left out of the last relays.

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6 hours ago, JesseSaenz said:

It would be nice to have it reach all 50 States + Puerto Rico. I hate that it was left out of the last relays.

50 states is too much.  Places like Wyoming, No. Dakota, Montana, N.Mexico, large parts of Arizona, Texas, etc., etc.  don't have enough population centers to matter routing the Relay there with, as you saw in the documentary, all the Support vehicles + the runners, logistics, etc.  At a certain point, cost and TOLL on the support crew makes for a diminishing rate of returns for the states mentioned above.  Even for Alaska, Hawaii, and PR, it's probably just flying in and running the flame for 1 day, and out the next.  

Edited by baron-pierreIV
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