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Rio 2016: Your verdict

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16 hours ago, brasilolimpico said:

Analysis: Thank you Rio de Janeiro, it was interesting!

1035293-olimpiadas_abertura-2104.jpg

In recent months very critical of the Olympic Park and the Olympic ceremonies as well as specific criticisms of the performance of the country in the organization of the games. Just now closing time we go to a general analysis?

I will divide into topics.

Opening ceremony:

It was Ok!
The ceremony was too simple compared to Beijing, tv great moments with the '14a' and the Brazilian music segment all there seemed truly Brazilian. In comparison there were horrible times like the cauldron lighting that should be the peak of the ceremony and seemed little creative.
The national anthem was a nice moment, but maybe I would have put more children near the flag.
What disappointed me is that there were so many people in the choreography, I was thinking that in London there were more dancers.

The boos to the President, Michel Temer was something expected. Brazilian booed Lula da Silva (Pan-American Games of 2007), Dilma Rousseff (Cup 2013 Confederations) and even cursed countless times the former President of the Republic in the World Cup 2014, with heavy offenses.

Yet surveys show that Brazilians prefer Michel Temer.

Transport and Mobility:

Everything seemed to work properly in the city for those who needed to go to the competition venues. However ordinary locals were affected, purchases of city dwellers who came from other states delayed several days before the time restriction for vehicles.

Sports:

It was exciting to see some games decided in the final moments, but overall not excited me like London in 2012.

Performance of 'Team Brazil'.

It was ok. Brazil won an amazing medal in Pole Vault and gold in football was sensational, but overall lacked medals in tennis, swimming and judo. The performance of women's football was unfair.
The case of athlete of diving left me upset because I hope dedication of the athletes in the Olympic Village.

Media.

The TV GLOBO was my 'official broadcaster'. The broadcaster has invested heavily in TV broadcasts and an amazing structure. At first I did not like the plans of the channel to have 170 hours of broadcasts, but I think it was appropriate. The channel broadcast all relevant times the national team.
What made me upset was the performance of TV RECORD, who failed to show significant moments.
The SPORTV with its 16 transmission channels was also a prominent part.
The ratings success of course, are the most viewed games in history. I believe that growth in Brazil will be able to cancel the fall in the United States.

Public at the venues.

I found it very nice to see the stadiums full to watch women's Braisl. But I found absurd empty seats in athletics and volleyball. The size of the arenas is appropriate.
The problem is the price of the tickets in my opinion should be 30% more affordable for qualifying events.

GENERAL NOTE:

7 points.

Strengths:
- Climate of Brazilians.

Negative points:
- The minority segment of society that wanted to mix their political frustrations with the Olympic Games.
- The performance of the national team.
- The low attendance in the stadiums.


Rio deserved the games?

Competitors were Madrid, Tokyo and Chicago. I think that if I were a member of the IOC at the time would have chosen Rio de Janeiro, the jingoism that it was the Brazil at the time.
The Rio de Janeiro is applied result of the ambitions of some politicians who felt the 'Rio 2016' the coronation of his ambitions. Surely, if there were no economic crisis and the wave of protests, Dilma Rousseff, Eduardo Paes and Ségio Cabral surfariam for high popularity.

If the election were today I would have granted to host the Olympic Games to Chicago.

RANKING OF OLYMPICS GAMES (Only I accompanied)
1. London 2012 (Note 9/10)
2. Vancovuer 2010 (Note 8/10)
2. Beijing 2008 (Note 8/10)
4. Athens 2004 (Note 7/10)
4. Rio 2016 (Note 7/10)
6. SOCHI 2014 (Note 6/10)
 

People prefer Temer.... To go to Mars.

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51 minutes ago, thorbr said:

People prefer Temer.... To go to Mars.

Or Neptune, for that case...

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Now the flame has gone out,

 I think it is now and only now that you now how you feel about the Rio Olympics

and I think If you look beyond the various  problems there were the word that comes to mind is
 
Beguiling

The amazing land scape was beguiling, parts of the ceremonies were beguiling and the sports action was beguiling

Beguiling

is how people will look back on it.

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Far too tired for a full review. But being in rio for my 3rd games (after London and Beijing) I have to say I enjoyed these the most from a personal perspective. 

The great disappointment was the crowd numbers at some events. Apart from that I thought it was a very Brasilian olympics and I will have fantastic memories from it.

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For me, Rio was a very mixed bag: I missed the first five days or so anyway due to our family trip to Norway (meaning instead of watching Rio, I visited Lillehammer & co and Oslo on the way). The reports I read online however were mainly focussing on Germany's initially lacklustre performance and of course the whole IOC affair with the role of Bach & his cronies.

Then, finally home and watching as much as I could, it was of course quite fascinating to see some great stories. From German perspective, the beachvolleyball and the women's football final were certainly highlights for me, also Hambüchen finally winning and that nervewrecking tennis final between Kerber and Puig. However, I'm very much a cynic when it comes to performances nowadays, especially when there's sudden increases (hello, Ms Ayana, looking at you) or such dominance that I'd rather put ??? than just cheer for the likes of Phelps or Bolt, to name the two big media darlings.

There was also the death of the German canoe slalom coach following a taxi accident, which was definitely overshadowing the mood here for a while (until, of course, the other canoe discipline swept home the medals). And you can count me among those who are really disappointed by the Brazilian audience reactions sometimes. The pole vault or the behaviour towards del Potro really was horrible.

The IOC itself...well...they couldn't know the state of Brazil seven years down the line from their vote, but they are driving the reputation of their sacred movement down pretty fast and if they don't find the brakes, they'll end up in a worse state than FIFA soon enough. I just hope that Rio taxpayers won't have to suffer forever and get a few benefits out of hosting after all.

I must also admit I'm not really looking forward much to Tokyo - I've never really been into Eastern Asia (apart from food), and I don't recall Nagano as particularly great atmosphere wise, so my hope is on a wise choice for 2024 (anyone but Budapest) and maybe one day a reasoned turn of public opinion in Germany to host.

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Strictly from my spectator-watching-livestream perspective, which of course can't capture the same feeling or nuances as being there in person:

A.  Sports and Spectacle = everything taking place in stadiums, pools, courts, road, etc including Ceremonies:   B+    Points taken off for an Opening Ceremony that was OK but not stellar and for the green pools debacle.  Otherwise, I'd have elevated this to A- or A.  

B.  Everything Else = logistics, transportation, security, venue and Village readiness, ticketing, fans disguised as empty seats, poor sportsmanship of many of the Brazilian crowds:  C-    With generally fuller venues, I'd have bumped this up to C+.   Minimizing or eliminating the jeers and boos in situations where it was rude and noncompliant with international sportsmanship norms, and I'd further bump up to B-/B.   When somebody says "Rio Olympics" in the future, I will remember these two issues more than any other missteps.       

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5 minutes ago, StefanMUC said:

I must also admit I'm not really looking forward much to Tokyo - I've never really been into Eastern Asia (apart from food), and I don't recall Nagano as particularly great atmosphere wise, so my hope is on a wise choice for 2024 (anyone but Budapest) and maybe one day a reasoned turn of public opinion in Germany to host.

Well, then you're in for a bumpy Olympic ride, aren't u?! PyeongChang 2018 - Tokyo 2020 - Beijing 2022! You'll be mad by the time 2024 rolls around then! But then again, so will the IOC probably lol!

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With all the negativity about the water, Zika virius, crime, and politicial instability. I thought that Rio did a decent job of the hosting the games but organization wise they could have done a better job of selling the tickets if couldn't give them all out, give them to the kids in the favelas where they will have a chance to be edcuated by sport. Overall, nothing seriouosly security wise happened but in my personal opinion, I would have to give these games a solid B

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12 minutes ago, StefanMUC said:

For me, Rio was a very mixed bag: I missed the first five days or so anyway due to our family trip to Norway (meaning instead of watching Rio, I visited Lillehammer & co and Oslo on the way). The reports I read online however were mainly focussing on Germany's initially lacklustre performance and of course the whole IOC affair with the role of Bach & his cronies.

Then, finally home and watching as much as I could, it was of course quite fascinating to see some great stories. From German perspective, the beachvolleyball and the women's football final were certainly highlights for me, also Hambüchen finally winning and that nervewrecking tennis final between Kerber and Puig. However, I'm very much a cynic when it comes to performances nowadays, especially when there's sudden increases (hello, Ms Ayana, looking at you) or such dominance that I'd rather put ??? than just cheer for the likes of Phelps or Bolt, to name the two big media darlings.

There was also the death of the German canoe slalom coach following a taxi accident, which was definitely overshadowing the mood here for a while (until, of course, the other canoe discipline swept home the medals). And you can count me among those who are really disappointed by the Brazilian audience reactions sometimes. The pole vault or the behaviour towards del Potro really was horrible.

The IOC itself...well...they couldn't know the state of Brazil seven years down the line from their vote, but they are driving the reputation of their sacred movement down pretty fast and if they don't find the brakes, they'll end up in a worse state than FIFA soon enough. I just hope that Rio taxpayers won't have to suffer forever and get a few benefits out of hosting after all.

I must also admit I'm not really looking forward much to Tokyo - I've never really been into Eastern Asia (apart from food), and I don't recall Nagano as particularly great atmosphere wise, so my hope is on a wise choice for 2024 (anyone but Budapest) and maybe one day a reasoned turn of public opinion in Germany to host.

Totally agree with you on the audience behaviour and the IOC's descent into ever steeper depths of corruption and tone-deafness. Ditto for Germany and a good candidate for 2024 (give me LA or Paris any day - Budapest won't happen and, due to lack of economic stability, neither will Rome). Also agree with you on the asterisk that has to be placed next to athlete performances these days, especially when they involve WRs.

Tokyo should be an awesome Olympic Games, precisely organized, with a rich culture (and great food!) on offer and, so it appears, Japan will be a credible contender for the Top 5 next time around. Germany? One day, hopefully, maybe, possibly...let's hope for the best!

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32 minutes ago, FYI said:

Well, then you're in for a bumpy Olympic ride, aren't u?! PyeongChang 2018 - Tokyo 2020 - Beijing 2022! You'll be mad by the time 2024 rolls around then! But then again, so will the IOC probably lol!

I know, I know...I'm mad anyway, ever since those in charge failed so miserably in convincing voters to back Munich 2022. It was on the silver plate there.

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12 minutes ago, StefanMUC said:

I know, I know...I'm mad anyway, ever since those in charge failed so miserably in convincing voters to back Munich 2022. It was on the silver plate there.

There's no reason to be mad at those in charge when there was nothing they could do to convince voters. Do you really think that people would change their minds 4 years later, especially after the Sochi winter games just happening? No way in hell you can convince people who were already not all that excited about a 2018 Munich games to go for the 2022 games unless you were to buy the vote. And you still had all those people in Garmisch who outright refused to let their land be used for the expansions needed for a winter Olympic games.

Actually just finding this article, Munich was already a lost cause even before the Sochi games happened. All four regions that had a referendum for the games voted no.  http://www.reuters.com/article/us-olympics-munich-idUSBRE9A90FH20131110

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1 hour ago, StefanMUC said:

However, I'm very much a cynic when it comes to performances nowadays, especially when there's sudden increases (hello, Ms Ayana, looking at you) or such dominance that I'd rather put ??? than just cheer for the likes of Phelps or Bolt, to name the two big media darlings.

bolt and phelps haven't failed drug tests though. the attitude of i'm sure so-and-so cheats i just can't prove it is as damaging to sport as the dopers themselves. what ever happened to innocent until proven guilty?

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30 minutes ago, kraussie-kraussie-kraussie said:

bolt and phelps haven't failed drug tests though. the attitude of i'm sure so-and-so cheats i just can't prove it is as damaging to sport as the dopers themselves. what ever happened to innocent until proven guilty?

In principle, I agree with you and you're absolutely right about the presumption of innocence. That said, recent scandals (what not with blood doping/EPO/Fuentes), trends in medicine (gene manipulation to eliminate certain enzymes or expand oxygen supply), frequent revelations of prior heroes being felled by drugs tests many years later and the general corrupt demeanour of the IOC (the Russian doping scandal being the latest instance) and the IFs (IAAF, FIFA only being the most blatant examples of networks of corruption), have contributed to the mood in Germany (as well as the Netherlands) having become one of pragmatic cynicism towards the IOC. The substantive gaps in the anti-doping regimen in many countries which have produced interesting athlete trajectories, right up to sensational world records - many of which have been pulverized in a manner that makes certain achievements suspicious. If you have nothing to hide, then why not invest in and conduct rigorous doping tests to remove all doubt?

 

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1 hour ago, StefanMUC said:

I know, I know...I'm mad anyway, ever since those in charge failed so miserably in convincing voters to back Munich 2022. It was on the silver plate there.

One of them being a certain Dr Thomas Bach...

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48 minutes ago, kraussie-kraussie-kraussie said:

bolt and phelps haven't failed drug tests though. the attitude of i'm sure so-and-so cheats i just can't prove it is as damaging to sport as the dopers themselves. what ever happened to innocent until proven guilty?

Also I remember reading somewhere that Michael Phelps puts himself through more doping tests than what is required by the IOC and USOC and has passed all of those tests. It's probably why no one ever discusses if he's ever doped before because there's that to shoot down any claims.

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59 minutes ago, plusbrilliantsexploits said:

The substantive gaps in the anti-doping regimen in many countries which have produced interesting athlete trajectories, right up to sensational world records - many of which have been pulverized in a manner that makes certain achievements suspicious

OK i get the cynicism from this angle. but phelps plays for the US. do you have doubts about the anti-doping regimen in our country (swimming in particular), because i was always under the impression that we take doping seriously. perhaps his affinity for questionable practices (cupping) have put additional doubts in your mind about him dancing on that fuzzy line between herbal/alt-medicine and unfair advantage.

as for bolt, i thought i heard he dabbles in herbal remedies, but of course i don't know if he's actively restructured his DNA or whatever they're doing these days.

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2 hours ago, LatinXTC said:

There's no reason to be mad at those in charge when there was nothing they could do to convince voters. Do you really think that people would change their minds 4 years later, especially after the Sochi winter games just happening? No way in hell you can convince people who were already not all that excited about a 2018 Munich games to go for the 2022 games unless you were to buy the vote. And you still had all those people in Garmisch who outright refused to let their land be used for the expansions needed for a winter Olympic games.

Actually just finding this article, Munich was already a lost cause even before the Sochi games happened. All four regions that had a referendum for the games voted no.  http://www.reuters.com/article/us-olympics-munich-idUSBRE9A90FH20131110

Errm...of course the time line was that the 2022 referendum took place before Sochi. But at the time, the local politicians as well as our sports bosses were very complacent. Also, there was low turnout, and if they had held the referendum together with the Bavarian elections some weeks earlier, I'm pretty sure we would have got a different result.

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Who knows, Stefan, who knows... I underestimated it at the time of the Munich referendum, but I think the general mood in the electorate was pretty much against hosting Olympic Games anyway. And even more so that was the case in Hamburg's referendum last year. Sadly, current events in world sports and within the IOC (talking of Pat Hickey and of course, the coward leading the IOC) are not helpful at all in bringing a pro-Olympic mood back to Germany again. I think that the last time Olympic Games got considerable support in Germany was in 2003, when Hamburg, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Stuttgart and Leipzig bid for the Games in the national pre-selection. The brilliant or at least very good Games of Sydney and Salt Lake had just happened, and for many people, the Olympic Games still were a very inspiring and prestigious event.

That's why I'm crossing my fingers that at least Rio will have a rather positive legacy of these Games. Because if its venues end up as white elephants and all the infrastructural investments done outside the venues should turn out to be futile, this might put an end to any Olympic ambitions by Germany and also many other nations for many, many years. Or maybe even forever. Even in 1976, after the Montreal debt disaster, the Olympic future didn't look as grim as it does today.

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9 hours ago, daveypodmore said:

The Beach Volleyball venue was stunning, and some of the events did highlight the incredible scenery, but I was left wanting more. I wanted my jaw to drop at the incredible backdrops, but it never did.

 I felt the same with beach volleyball. Copacabana didn't shine as gorgeously as I expected. Partly that most of the matches i watched from there were at night. But even in the few daytime games I caught, I didn't get as much vibe that these were at, gasp, Copacabana! as I expected. Does that make sense?

...

Doping? For my two cent's worth:

I'd like to think that the likes of Australia, USA, GB, Germany, France, Canada et al are reasonably stringent as they can be in their testing for nothing else that they wouldn't want to risk the massive scandal if one of their own is exposed as a cheat. Don't know if that's naive or not. At the same time, probably naive to think the odd individual doesn't try and succeed to get around the rules.

Individually. yes, I've heard that Phelps goes that extra mile to head off any claims that can be made against him. I've heard athletics commentaries discuss Bolt, and most conclude he doesn't - his power isn't so much in his muscle mass, he's a slow starter (they say he'd be more explosive at the starts if he was a doper) and his power seems to be in his stride rather than bulk. Hey, I wanna believe that. I like him. I'd be devastated if he was a cheat. 

 

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Rio was a spectacular Games, with beautiful locations, great competition and no major security issues,,,,,it looked great on TV, and the competition was successfully carried out in all 27+ sports. It was a successful Games...no one could have predicted the financial woes of Brasil 7 years ago.

I loved the ceremonies because finally someone had the courage to slash the ridiculous budgets- in London Pandemonium was amazing, but the rest was pretty much a mess. Rio's ceremonies had more heart and cohesion for me.

I think where they fell down was completing everything too late and not having enough time for test events as we all predicted. So security was lengthy and slow, there was inadequate numbers of volunteers, entry to venues was slow, not enough food outlets, spectator transport was compromised....But a beautiful and memorable Games

 

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Considering all the issues Brazil had to face, and our region which has never hosted such a big event before, I think the country did a decent job in the end. Sure, there were many issues, but none of them proved to be catastrophic in the end, which is what counts, and now they've gained a lot of experience at hosting events like this, which should be considered a good thing. I don't think these will go down as one of the best games in history, but still they offered us many good and memorable sport moments such as Usain Bolt and Michael Phelps ending his carreer with a golden brochure, achieving what no olympic athlete has never done before.

Ceremonies: Despite the tight budget, they were very good. Not spectacular/opulent like Beijing or to some extent, London, but still very Brazilian. I can forgive the fact the cauldron was small because of the beautiful Kinetic sculpture which made up for it. 

Venues: Hit and Miss. Some were spectacular when the nature and landscape of Rio was there to help, while most of the indoor venues were not particulary memorable. The athletics stadium wasn't among the best but a blue track was a good change for something different. 

Look: So-so. It had a lot of potential but many of it was wasted due in part to the economic troubles. But still we had a very nice logo and memorable mascots. 

Sport: Both memorable (Usain Bolt, Phelps) and forgettable (boorish behavior of crowd, Lochte).

I think I give Rio overall a 7 or 7.5/10. Decent Olympics, a bit glitchy but far from the disaster many feared. 

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I'll choose to remember these Games for the exceptional athletic performances.  I can't think of another Games in which virtually all of the pre-Games stars delivered, and there were so many great surprises and new stars born as well.

With that said, it's a shame that the athletes had to compete in half-empty stadiums in front of disinterested (at best) and jeering (at worst) crowds.  I can forgive small organizational glitches, transportation issues, etc. - those are part of the charm of any Games, no matter how well organized they are.  But there is no excuse for so many empty seats and poorly-behaved crowds - the athletes deserved far better.

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2 hours ago, TorchbearerSydney said:

 

I loved the ceremonies because finally someone had the courage to slash the ridiculous budgets- in London Pandemonium was amazing, but the rest was pretty much a mess. Rio's ceremonies had more heart and cohesion for me.

 

Courage? It's not really that courageous when you're slashing the budget because your economy is collapsing and you have no choice but to do it. People need to stop thinking that Brazil was taking a stance against large Olympic budgets. It still spent billions and billions of dollars before it had to cut the budget because they were running out of money. It put the Paralympics in jeopardy, do you think that's courageous for the country and city to have mishandled their finances that it would jeopardize those games? I think not.

 

Despite that, under the conditions Rio and Brazil did a tremendous job under the conditions. Yea it wasn't without its snafus. A lot of them happened in the beginning, which resembled a lot of what Sochi had to go through. But where it mattered, they delivered and for that they should be congratulated.

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36 minutes ago, LatinXTC said:

Courage? It's not really that courageous when you're slashing the budget because your economy is collapsing and you have no choice but to do it. People need to stop thinking that Brazil was taking a stance against large Olympic budgets. It still spent billions and billions of dollars before it had to cut the budget because they were running out of money. It put the Paralympics in jeopardy, do you think that's courageous for the country and city to have mishandled their finances that it would jeopardize those games? I think not.

But people also need to stop thinking they were on an uncontrolled spending spree before they got hit by recession either. Their Olympic-specific and venue builds were actually quite modest compared to most recent hosts. A lot of it had been already put in place through the Pan-Ams. Infrastructure-wise, much, like its airport improvements, were done before the WC. The village was done through a private sector arrangement. Some venues were done as temporary or recyclable.  They didn't have the particularly huge big-ticket items like a main stadium to build. And when they did present some of the "lesser than other hosts" results like the Olympic Park or less signage, they still got bagged out a lot here for being too cheap and second rate - you can't have it both ways. I think they did as well as they could in terms of not being too profligate and having responsible legacy planning before and after their economic bubble popped. Certainly far more responsible than the likes of Athens or Beijing, much less Sochi.

Edited by Sir Rols
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11 hours ago, kraussie-kraussie-kraussie said:

OK i get the cynicism from this angle. but phelps plays for the US. do you have doubts about the anti-doping regimen in our country (swimming in particular), because i was always under the impression that we take doping seriously. perhaps his affinity for questionable practices (cupping) have put additional doubts in your mind about him dancing on that fuzzy line between herbal/alt-medicine and unfair advantage.

as for bolt, i thought i heard he dabbles in herbal remedies, but of course i don't know if he's actively restructured his DNA or whatever they're doing these days.

Well, Phelps and Bolt were not necessarily the two I was thinking of here - but the most prominent icons, and I do know that German commentators have been expressing doubts about the anti-doping regimen in Jamaica: every single time a Jamaican athlete wins, the journos on the public broadcast channel feel that it's necessary to say "Well, that was rather impressive, but - and I have to mention this and don't intend to spoil the mood here - it is important to bear in mind that Jamaica has been criticized by the WADA for its lax verification of blood and urine samples", only to proceed to pay a hurried lip service to the presumption of innocence. It's the same routine whenever someone seems to have come out of nowhere or pulverizes a long-standing world record. It's become a tiresome and understandable routine at the time.

I guess the commentators on our two public broadcasters (which still hold the rights via the EBU) cannot go all out and accuse Bolt, Phelps, Ledecky and Hozszu of doping (thus, biting the hand that feeds your ratings and advertising slots), but they are essentially doing it via the backdoor with a "wink wink, nod nod" style. In other cases, the past of exposed drugs cheats makes such a disclaimer almost necessary - for instance, in the case of the female walking champion from China or many a weightlifter, or Yuliya Efimova etc. Needless to say, that cynicism about sport also contributed to the Hamburg bid's defeat in the referendum and lower ratings than in previous years (rather than the proliferation of private TV networks, which also existed in 1992 and 1996). That, and the moralizing and ignorant way in which German broadcasters frequently tend to cover foreign societies in general.

Finally, it's becoming clearer that the cynicism in Germany has become so widespread that many Germans find it hard to immediately accept scientifc explanations for why a certain athlete just has a natural advantage. Funnily enough, I never heard any such accusations being made about German athletes (except for Kathrin Krabbe and her cohort, but that was way back in the 1990s and seen as part of East Germany's sordid legacy of state-authorized doping) and I feel that there is a fair element of moralizing jingoism (not necessarily in a xenophobic fashion, but in a "look at us, we are oh-so-clean and we would never, ever cheat" way) among some of us Germans as well. It also becomes too easy an excuse to justify sub-par performances by Germany in track & field, and swimming.

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