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Greece First:

Following by the countries in alphabetical order of the host country (Brazilian Portuguese)

Refugee Olympic Athletes (New this year)

Brazil

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Summer_Olympics_Parade_of_Nations

 

1  Greece (GRE)
2  Afghanistan (AFG)
3  South Africa (RSA)
4  Albania (ALB)
5  Germany (GER)
6  Andorra (AND)
7  Angola (ANG)
8  Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (MKD)
9  Antigua and Barbuda (ANT)
10  Saudi Arabia (KSA)
11  Algeria (ALG)
12  Argentina (ARG)
13  Armenia (ARM)
14  Aruba (ARU)
15  Australia (AUS)
16  Austria (AUT)
17  Azerbaijan (AZE)
18  Bahamas (BAH)
19  Bahrain (BRN)
20  Bangladesh (BAN)
21  Barbados (BAR)
22  Belgium (BEL)
23  Belize (BIZ)
24  Benin (BEN)
25  Bermuda (BER)
26  Belarus (BLR)
27  Bolivia (BOL)
28  Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH)
29  Botswana (BOT)
30  Brunei Darussalam (BRU)
31  Bulgaria (BUL)
32  Burkina Faso (BUR)
33  Burundi (BDI)
34  Bhutan (BHU)
35  Cape Verde (CPV)
36  Cameroon (CMR)
37  Cambodia (CAM)
38  Canada (CAN)
39  Qatar (QAT)
40  Kazakhstan (KAZ)
41  Chad (CHA)
42  Chile (CHI)
43  Cyprus (CYP)
44  Colombia (COL)
45  Comoros (COM)
46  Congo (CGO)
47  Ivory Coast (CIV)
48  Costa Rica (CRC)
49  Croatia (CRO)
50  Cuba (CUB)
51  Denmark (DEN)
52  Djibouti (DJI)
53  Dominica (DMA)
54  Egypt (EGY)
55  El Salvador (ESA)
56  United Arab Emirates (UAE)
57  Ecuador (ECU)
58  Eritrea (ERI)
59  Slovakia (SVK)
60  Slovenia (SLO)
61  Spain (ESP)
62  Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)
63  United States of America (USA)
64  Estonia (EST)
65  Ethiopia (ETH)
66  Russian Federation (RUS)
67  Fiji (FIJ)
68  Philippines (PHI)
69  Finland (FIN)
70  France (FRA)
71  Gabon (GAB)
72  Gambia (GAM)
73  Ghana (GHA)
74  Georgia (GEO)
75  Great Britain (GBR)
76  Grenada (GRN)
77  Guam (GUM)
78  Guatemala (GUA)
79  Guyana (GUY)
80  Guinea (GUI)
81  Guinea-Bissau (GBS)
82  Equatorial Guinea (GEQ)
83  Haiti (HAI)
84  Honduras (HON)
85  Hong Kong, China (HKG)
86  Hungary (HUN)
87  Yemen (YEM)
88  Cayman Islands (CAY)
89  Cook Islands (COK)
90  Marshall Islands (MHL)
91  Solomon Islands (SOL)
92  Virgin Islands (ISV)
93  British Virgin Islands (IVB)
94  India (IND)
95  Indonesia (INA)
96  Iraq (IRQ)
97  Ireland (IRL)
98  Iceland (ISL)
99  Israel (ISR)
100  Italy (ITA)
101  Jamaica (JAM)
102  Japan (JPN)
103  Jordan (JOR)
104  Kiribati (KIR)
105  Kosovo (KOS)
106  Kuwait (KUW)
107  Lesotho (LES)
108  Latvia (LAT)
109  Lebanon (LIB)
110  Liberia (LBR)
111  Libya (LBA)
112  Liechtenstein (LIE)
113  Lithuania (LTU)
114  Luxembourg (LUX)
115  Madagascar (MAD)
116  Malaysia (MAS)
117  Malawi (MAW)
118  Maldives (MDV)
119  Mali (MLI)
120  Malta (MLT)
121  Morocco (MAR)
122  Mauritius (MRI)
123  Mauritania (MTN)
124  Mexico (MEX)
125  Mozambique (MOZ)
126  Monaco (MON)
127  Mongolia (MGL)
128  Montenegro (MNE)
129  Myanmar (MYA)
130  Namibia (NAM)
131  Nauru (NRU)
132  Nepal (NEP)
133  Nicaragua (NCA)
134  Niger (NIG)
135  Nigeria (NGR)
136  Norway (NOR)
137  New Zealand (NZL)
138  Oman (OMA)
139  Netherlands (NED)
140  Palau (PLW)
141  Palestine (PLE)
142  Panama (PAN)
143  Papua New Guinea (PNG)
144  Pakistan (PAK)
145  Paraguay (PAR)
146  Peru (PER)
147  Poland (POL)
148  Puerto Rico (PUR)
149  Portugal (POR)
150  Kenya (KEN)
151  Kyrgyzstan (KGZ)
152  Central African Republic (CAF)
153  Republic of Korea (KOR)
154  Republic of Moldova (MDA)
155  Democratic Republic of the Congo (COD)
156  Dominican Republic (DOM)
157  Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI)
158  People's Republic of China (CHN)
159  Democratic People's Republic of Korea (PRK)
160  Lao People's Democratic Republic (LAO)
161  Czech Republic (CZE)
162  Romania (ROU)
163  Rwanda (RWA)
164  Samoa (SAM)
165  American Samoa (ASA)
166  San Marino (SMR)
167  Saint Lucia (LCA)
168  Saint Kitts and Nevis (SKN)
169  São Tomé and Príncipe (STP)
170  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (VIN)
171  Senegal (SEN)
172  Sierra Leone (SLE)
173  Serbia (SRB)
174  Seychelles (SEY)
175  Singapore (SIN)
176  Syria (SYR)
177  Somalia (SOM)
178  Sri Lanka (SRI)
179  Swaziland (SWZ)
180  Sudan (SUD)
181  South Sudan (SSD)
182  Sweden (SWE)
183  Switzerland (SUI)
184  Suriname (SUR)
185  Thailand (THA)
186  Chinese Taipei (TPE)
187  Tajikistan (TJK)
188  Tanzania (TAN)
189  Timor-Leste (TLS)
190  Togo (TOG)
191  Tonga (TGA)
192  Trinidad and Tobago (TTO)
193  Tunisia (TUN)
194  Turkmenistan (TKM)
195  Turkey (TUR)
196  Tuvalu (TUV)
197  Ukraine (UKR)
198  Uganda (UGA)
199  Uruguay (URU)
200  Uzbekistan (UZB)
201  Vanuatu (VAN)
202  Venezuela (VEN)
203  Vietnam (VIE)
204  Zambia (ZAM)
205  Zimbabwe (ZIM)
206  Refugee Olympic Athletes (ROA)
207  Brazil (BRA)
 

 

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The Kuwatis will be marching under the IOC flag since the  NOC is banned not the atheletes themsleves. Kinda Silly if you ask me, let them march under their own flag ( or BAN them for realsies). I didnt realize India was under any sanctions... whats their story?

 

AJ

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That India sanction is so old. It happened in 2013 due to government interference in the NOC issues, much like Kuwait. But it was apparently lifted after they did transparent elections to pick new leadership.

Meanwhile, there are lots of proofs Russia had skeletons in the closet but here we have them in the Olympics, for those who still had doubts the IOC are a bunch of convenient cowards. 

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I notice the list on Wikipedia is now different that was posted before. Some of the countries are now in different spots.

 

Here is the link to the updated list:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Summer_Olympics_Parade_of_Nations

 

Kuwait (between Yemen and India) is now listed as the 'Independent Olympic Participants' and given the IOC code KUW

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, baron-pierreIV said:

207  nations (well, including ROA) -- that's ridiculously LONG.   I thought Kuwait and India were banned outright?  

I think they must find a way to handle with the Parade. I know it is the moment of the athletes. But it is boring. Too long.

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5 hours ago, Ikarus360 said:

TeamBlake, what have you done with intoronto's account?! I demand an answer!:angry:

:blink:


I don't think you read the list. Kuwait is listed as coming out under its name. It will come as Independent Olympics Athletes, and they will march right after Aruba.

 

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Oh. Oops :lol: sorry about that. I was trying to make a joke but aw well.

Anyway. For what I understood the number of athletes marching will be smaller than before due to space/time constraint. I think Venezuela will only send like 15 athletes to march in or something. 

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11 hours ago, Mauricio said:

I think they must find a way to handle with the Parade. I know it is the moment of the athletes. But it is boring. Too long.

The parade of athletes is the whole point of the thing.  The rest is mostly a made-for-tv show that has only the most tenuous relationship to the sports.

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^^ This. The parade of athletes has always been the core of the Opening Ceremonies. Cultural performances were only started to be introduced in the 70's or very late 60's

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16 hours ago, Ikarus360 said:

That India sanction is so old. It happened in 2013 due to government interference in the NOC issues, much like Kuwait. But it was apparently lifted after they did transparent elections to pick new leadership.

Meanwhile, there are lots of proofs Russia had skeletons in the closet but here we have them in the Olympics, for those who still had doubts the IOC are a bunch of convenient cowards. 

I couldn't agree more, Ikarus. With the absence of any sound judgment regarding the widespread, wilful and systemic manipulation of sporting performances under the auspices of the Russian Ministry of Sports, the International Olympic Committee (and especially Mr Bach) have removed the last veneer of integrity that the Olympic Movement (by the barest skin of their teeth, mind you) appeared to possess. The participation of even ONE Russian athlete, let alone the 271 being bandied about in the media as a ballpark figure, is an utter surrender to the strongarming by President Putin. Other nations, heck individual athletes, will be able to say: "What's good enough for the Russians...". The signal this sends to clean athletes is probably even more harrowing: Dope as well or play clean and be responsible for your own loss to doped athletes.

Whilst I cannot speak for the public across this planet, I can get a good sense from the fellow Europeans I speak to: The IOC is seen as a corrupt organization or, at least, one that aids and abets corruption in its midst, encourages overspending, fails to share the proceeds of sponsorship with the people who do the actual work (the Host Cities and national governments, which are not even allowed to impose tax or levies of any kind on this once-in-a-lifetime event) etc. Its reputation was already damaged prior to the Russian doping scandal. Now, it has been blown to smithereens. More than anything, it's this loss of reputation that has been giving the world an ever-increasing turn of Host Cities in dictatorially-led nations (which can spend as much as they want, without popular accountability) and fewer applications to actually host the Games by democratic countries. That is, with the notable exception of France (though I feel Paris 2024 will be impacted by the complete incompetence of the current French President to rein in terrorist assaults) and the United States. Elsewhere, popular pressure has been so high that promising or, at the very least, plausible bids have had to be abandoned (hello Hamburg, hello Oslo). Welcome to the world of Pyeongchang and Almaty, ladies and gentemen.

This entire Rio 2016 enterprise looks like one giant self-indulgence by the Brazilian elites to me, in a time of political corruption (Mrs Rousseff's impeachment trial), economic instability, international tension on so many fronts (ISIS, Syrian War, refugees etc), rampant poverty in large parts of Rio (which can not be explained away by saying it has always existed or somewhat improved, or by hiding it behind a wall. I'm a free-marketeer and no communist sympathizer, but these Olympics are leaving a very sour taste in my mouth. It looks like a Games of the rich, for the rich and by the rich - which has very, very little to do with the Olympic Games of yesteryear. This is no Barcelona 1992, no Sydney 2000 or a Sydney 2000 (incidentally Games staged in countries that could handle it, weren't riddled with disease, a widespread breakdown of healthcare mechanisms, massive instability and a less-than-competent planning of the run-up to the Games). Look, I love Brazil and the Brazilian people - they are open-hearted, warm and kind. But that has to be separated from this utter shambles of an Olympics. Maybe this will be a Latin American version of London 2012 where many people fretted about Day 1 only to be proven completely wrong. And maybe with ample help from military, paramilitary and police forces, both terrorist attacks and street riots by the dispossessed in the streets of Rio can be nipped in the bud. But these just look like the Games that may "jump the shark" for the IOC. If we hand the Games to Rio, why shouldn't we stage them anywhere else that's not ready in socioeconomic or organizational terms?

Finally, I was in Montréal recently. A truly beautiful trip to a genuinely beautiful city and I did end up taking pictures of the Olympic Park - and yes, some of it is truly remarkable, and the city itself has done well overall, for instance with the Metro, the Botanical Gardens and the Biodome (which used to be the Velodrome back in the days). Still, Montrealers do say that the Olympic Stadium alone had too hefty a price tag - and maybe it's simply too high a price to pay. And those Games took place in a G7 industrial country. Yes, I know, Brazil is a G20 nation, but the standards are surely not comparable, no? I apologize if this sounds all haughty and Western-condescending (not my intent), but my trip to Montréal was a timely reminder of both the potential and the cost of the Games. The price tag has swelled since those pre-Samaranch days, and not to the advantage of Host Cities.

Maybe this is a tad off-topic, but this was just on my mind and I had to get it off my chest. Thanks for reading this little rant. Boa sorte to the people of Rio de Janeiro and the citizens of Brazil - they deserve it and need it. The IOC? Not so much.

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2 hours ago, Al in NYC said:

The parade of athletes is the whole point of the thing.  The rest is mostly a made-for-tv show that has only the most tenuous relationship to the sports.

I bet there will be a lone child on the field as teh stadium is quieted to make us remember the the innocence. I think its require now along with the Oaths.

 

AJ 

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Thankfuly, that won't happen. There will only be kids in the Olympic Anthem and what seems to be the dove of peace segment. The show won't revolve around them. 

1 hour ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

Bryan Pinkall might quibble about the date. Here's 1936 and "Olympic Youth":

tmp9BBD-356.jpg

I know about the Hitler Youth performances in 1936 though those were part of the Cultural Olympiad and not the actual ceremonies. 

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On 05/08/2016 at 8:44 PM, Ikarus360 said:

Thankfuly, that won't happen. There will only be kids in the Olympic Anthem and what seems to be the dove of peace segment. The show won't revolve around them. 

I know about the Hitler Youth performances in 1936 though those were part of the Cultural Olympiad and not the actual ceremonies. 

They weren't all Hitler Youth- just loads of kids from the Berlin area. As to whether the "Olympische Jugend" performance was part of the OC- there was certainly a gap of several hours between the actual opening declaration and the start of the performance, but it was the same stadium on the same day, and the main reason for the break seems to have been an ahead-of-its-time decision to perform at night (which allowed interesting lighting effects, but prevented filming with the low-sensitivity movie stock then available).

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  • 3 weeks later...

In a completely different thread [his Member Blog] CAF asked a question about the Burundi team's entrance in the Parade:

Quote

Still wondering why there was no bicycle - did somebody heard an explanation?

I don't know the answer for sure, but I think I can make an educated guess.

Rio's Parade of Nations used literally every known trick from earlier opening ceremony parades, to make the process smooth and enjoyable for all:

  •     A development of Sochi's technique of having teams do half-laps rather than full laps: parading up the centre of the arena, then back round one side before assembling in the general crowd on that side. In Rio, however, only the initial parade up the centre (along the long axis rather than the short axis as in 2014) was really captured on TV, with no special lighting round the edges.
  •     A development of Beijing's technique of having the marshals around the general crowd do synchronised dance routines to add to the fun (the development, first adopted, I think, in Vancouver, being the abandonment of 2008's apparent attempt to keep the marshals dancing continuously for over 2 hours).
  •     The use of c120 bpm music throughout (2004's 140 bpm having been found to be too fast for walking)
  •     The use of children carrying "gifts" at the head of each team (as seen in London)
  •     The use of "sheepdog" musicians walking right behind each team to force the pace (also as seen in London, but applied in Rio to every team, not just the larger ones)

In the picture here (from somewhere around "Azerbaijan"), the red square indicates a line of "sheepdogs"; the green squares indicate tricycle waiting areas.

http://www.pastpresented.ukart.com/marksnow/Rio-parade-1.jpg

  •     THE BIG MISTAKE was the tricycles.

There's a subtle reason why the country name-boards in the parade of nations tend to be carried by slightly-built young women: the athletes instinctively want to show that they can easily match the pace which is being set. Tricycles don't have that psychological effect, either on the athletes or the children carrying the "gifts" who will, instead, try to keep up with the flag-bearers. Result; the tricycles either drift ridiculously far ahead of the athletes, or they have to slow down to match the athletes' stroll.

And if the tricycles are doing multiple circuits with different teams, that can create a further problem. I think that Burundi's name nightmare arose because the parade was so slow, and one side of the stadium had so many small teams each requiring their own tricycle, that for a minute or so, there were no spare tricycles on that side.

 

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