Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Another one who thought Tokyo's handover was just incredible. I can't recall ever being just so excited following a handover presentation at an upcoming Olympics - I think it was the dynamism, modernity and polish. Made even more apparent by Rio's shambolic and tepid opening and closing ceremonies. Bring on Tokyo 2020!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking back, it is interesting how much more generous both London and Rio were in terms of floor-space and technology for the handover compared with Beijing. I'm aware London had difficulties getting much co-operation from their Chinese counterparts. Looking at both London's closing and Rio's it looks like their OCOG's were more happy to share and integrate things like stadium lighting, projections, fireworks etc with the next host. Aspects of London's handover would've been awful even with better integration, but nevertheless, there does seem to be a difference. I wonder if this is something that the IOC has tried to improve upon post-Beijing.

Edited by Rob.
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Rob. said:

Looking back, it is interesting how much more generous both London and Rio were in terms of floor-space and technology for the handover compared with Beijing. I'm aware London had difficulties getting much co-operation from their Chinese counterparts. Looking at both London's closing and Rio's it looks like their OCOG's were more happy to share and integrate things like stadium lighting, projections, fireworks etc with the next host. Aspects of London's handover would've been awful even with better integration, but nevertheless, there does seem to be a difference. I wonder if this is something that the IOC has tried to improve upon post-Beijing.

I agree, London didn't had space to shine in Beijing's CC which was a awful handover.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Rob. said:

Looking back, it is interesting how much more generous both London and Rio were in terms of floor-space and technology for the handover compared with Beijing. I'm aware London had difficulties getting much co-operation from their Chinese counterparts. Looking at both London's closing and Rio's it looks like their OCOG's were more happy to share and integrate things like stadium lighting, projections, fireworks etc with the next host. Aspects of London's handover would've been awful even with better integration, but nevertheless, there does seem to be a difference. I wonder if this is something that the IOC has tried to improve upon post-Beijing.

i still love the bus but yes london's handover was little to no partnership with the beijing counterpart. you can even see that they used thier own crew to film it. rio had the whole stage to themselves. london had a spot on the front end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gamesnz said:

Japan's presentation and the perspective inside the stadium... It was way more interesting on TV. 

 

The whole ceremony was designed for TV. In particular, having the athletes sitting round the edge of the Field of Play pushed the whole performance a significant distance further away from the paying spectators. One odd consequence of that was that exposure meters in many video cameras gave an average reading over the whole scene (including a huge mass of darkened auditorium), making it too bright, as we see here; in reality, for live spectators, it would have looked more satisfactory. One good thing: except for a couple of short sections with text, Tokyo's presentation was careful not to impose a "right direction" for viewing, which is not a polite thing to do in a stadium spectacle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

The whole ceremony was designed for TV. In particular, having the athletes sitting round the edge of the Field of Play pushed the whole performance a significant distance further away from the paying spectators. One odd consequence of that was that exposure meters in many video cameras gave an average reading over the whole scene (including a huge mass of darkened auditorium), making it too bright, as we see here; in reality, for live spectators, it would have looked more satisfactory. One good thing: except for a couple of short sections with text, Tokyo's presentation was careful not to impose a "right direction" for viewing, which is not a polite thing to do in a stadium spectacle.

Probably influenced by the design of their logo. Did you notice the colours and shapes alluded to the logo?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, gamesnz said:

Probably influenced by the design of their logo. Did you notice the colours and shapes alluded to the logo?

Yes, absolutely. From about 6:35 they explicitly form the logo (not seen clearly in that video). One of the key factors in the success of Tokyo's handover presentation was developing a consistent theme and style (which both London and Rio had spectacularly failed to do in their handovers).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

Yes, absolutely. From about 6:35 they explicitly form the logo (not seen clearly in that video). One of the key factors in the success of Tokyo's handover presentation was developing a consistent theme and style (which both London and Rio had spectacularly failed to do in their handovers).

True. But Rio, in the handover and ceremonies showcased its culture (was that its theme?) and established dance and music as its style. London's handover was pointless, but its ceremonies had a strong drama and musical thematic. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, gamesnz said:

True. But Rio, in the handover and ceremonies showcased its culture (was that its theme?) and established dance and music as its style. London's handover was pointless, but its ceremonies had a strong drama and musical thematic. 

Trouble was "dance and music"- as the London CC itself was clearly demonstrating- encompasses many styles, not one, and Rio should not have been trying to cram so many different styles (and so many performances by stars who had to be explained to non-Brazilian audiences) into its timeslot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think someone already posted this before, but Yasutaka Nakata, from the electronic music group Capsule was the one in charge for the music during the light boxes dance part of the handover.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsule_(band)

The music of both the intro and the final part of the handover were previous compositions by Shiina Ringo

No idea what was the inspiration for the Kimigayo arrangement, but it sounds similar to Kenji Kawaii compositions for the anime Ghost in the Shell. I would like to know whats the specific name used for this kind of chorus, though. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ikarus360 said:

No idea what was the inspiration for the Kimigayo arrangement, but it sounds similar to Kenji Kawaii compositions for the anime Ghost in the Shell. I would like to know whats the specific name used for this kind of chorus, though. 

The original Ghost in the Shell soundtrack used Bulgarian singers to get a very distinctive sound:

- however the Closing Ceremony version of Kimigayo, while almost certainly intended to remind people of this style, dialed down the harmonic weirdness a bit.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 24/08/2016 at 6:57 AM, gamesnz said:

Japan's presentation and the perspective inside the stadium... It was way more interesting on TV. 

 

So the sports introduction was fake? Again people had to look at the screens to try to understand what is happening, like the Santos Dumont flight. Ok, the ceremonies were made for TV but they can't forget that they sold thousands of ridiculous expensive tickets. I'm glad I saved the money and watched at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Bezzi said:

So the sports introduction was fake? Again people had to look at the screens to try to understand what is happening, like the Santos Dumont flight. Ok, the ceremonies were made for TV but they can't forget that they sold thousands of ridiculous expensive tickets. I'm glad I saved the money and watched at home.

That's always the big trade off though. Both for sports and the ceremonies, you'll see things better on TV, you'll get commentary on TV (be that for good or ill), but you'll never replicate the atmosphere and excitement of being there in person on TV.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Sir Rols said:

That's always the big trade off though. Both for sports and the ceremonies, you'll see things better on TV, you'll get commentary on TV (be that for good or ill), but you'll never replicate the atmosphere and excitement of being there in person on TV.

Except there's the matter of the football match (soccer match) effect, which this handover did use to an extent.

Association Football works so well as a stadium sport because the most important action is not necessarily anywhere near the ball. Spectators have to use their ability to perceive the whole field of play at once and switch the direction of their concentration between different actions in widely separated locations. TV (at least until 8k wall-sized screens become the norm) has to offer crude substitutes for that ability, by switching the close-up view seen through its relatively small rectangular window.

If you watch the Tokyo handover closely you'll see that, although the overall "eye" formation with its associated light-show gives structure to the live performance, individuals or small groups of performers are often doing very different things. If you were in the stadium, you'd be able to see all those different performance elements at once, and switch between them multiple times per second if you wished. The augmented reality which will be featured in near-future stadium events will (though perhaps not quite in the way the handover simulation implied) add a valuable new aspect to the football match effect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 25/08/2016 at 6:36 PM, Ikarus360 said:

No idea what was the inspiration for the Kimigayo arrangement, but it sounds similar to Kenji Kawaii compositions for the anime Ghost in the Shell. I would like to know whats the specific name used for this kind of chorus, though. 
 

For the ceremony, the Bulgarian choir used by arranger Jun Miyake was "Cosmic Voices" (with whom he has worked on other projects in recent years, and who are now on tour with him).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On youtube I found an interesting side by side of Tokyo's handover versus Pyeongchang's. It only has the sound of the Tokyo one.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, phandrosis said:

On youtube I found an interesting side by side of Tokyo's handover versus Pyeongchang's. It only has the sound of the Tokyo one.

In retrospect it seems obvious- your nation is allotted less than 10 minutes to promote itself at the Olynpic Games; viral videos are almost always less than 10 minutes long. PyeongChang should have been able to figure that out in a post-2012 world, but for some reason they ignored the opportunity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, JMarkSnow2012 said:

In retrospect it seems obvious- your nation is allotted less than 10 minutes to promote itself at the Olynpic Games; viral videos are almost always less than 10 minutes long. PyeongChang should have been able to figure that out in a post-2012 world, but for some reason they ignored the opportunity.

But interestingly that video shows that everything that's cool in Tokyo's handover is in the presentation video while the artistic segment itself (apart from the music) is way too static and boring compared to PyeongChang's handover in both Olympics and Paralympics..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, zigzag said:

But interestingly that video shows that everything that's cool in Tokyo's handover is in the presentation video while the artistic segment itself (apart from the music) is way too static and boring compared to PyeongChang's handover in both Olympics and Paralympics..

Static? I'd call it "differently dynamic"- not the usual handover succession of different microperformances.

Anybody out there read Japanese semaphore? The flag waving from 7:52 in that video seems to make random letters in English.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×