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13 hours ago, WD96 said:

Oh god, these guys. They zoom-bombed an IOC meeting last month, destroyed private prosperity eleven years ago in Vancouver, and released a restaurant owner's personal phone number two years ago. These guys are mostly radical left. If you looked them up on Reddit, you can see the antifa logo on a No Olympics demonstration back in July 2019.

To us, as Olympic fans, that sentiment against the Games and even the IOC are truly a new breed of cancel culture. We don't want money and politics to be surrounded everywhere before and during the Olympics, and that's because diversity and tranquility through sport is more independent from both. For those who were 'Anti-Olympic-ers', they've looked back to the Games' darker past, and once more because of what they are doing in an IOC virtual meeting last month, just as you said, they had acted too much in order to ruin its reputation.

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Stop the “cancel culture” bs.

Money and politics are at the heart of each and every IOC decision, no matter how much sugarcoating their PR department does.

If they get a harsh wind blowing in their face, that’s pretty much their own making, it’s easy for radical activists to target them.

By the way, “antifa” means antifascism. I think everyone should actually be antifascist, because if you aren’t, what makes that of you?

I’m not saying the IOC is a fascist organisation (well, google Brundage or Samaranch’s lives…), but getting all worked up that an “antifa” logo is displayed at a Nolympics protest is pretty absurd.

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7 hours ago, StefanMUC said:

By the way, “antifa” means antifascism. I think everyone should actually be antifascist, because if you aren’t, what makes that of you?

The radicals had misused that term as they target anyone who is not really fascist.

I am worried that there are going to be riots in Tokyo during the Olympics.

Regarding the IOC meeting incident, that act of zoom-bombing was illegal and I do hope the authorities will take action aganist the individuals who did this. 

But all of that aside, I do extremely hope that everyone is safe at the Tokyo Olympics. So, thoughts and prayers for a safe and healthy games.

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3 hours ago, WD96 said:

The radicals had misused that term as they target anyone who is not really fascist.

I am worried that there are going to be riots in Tokyo during the Olympics.

Regarding the IOC meeting incident, that act of zoom-bombing was illegal and I do hope the authorities will take action against the individuals who did this. 

But all of that aside, I do extremely hope that everyone is safe at the Tokyo Olympics. So, thoughts and prayers for a safe and healthy games.

I hope that security in Tokyo would be much tighter during Games time, but turbulence in the host city was too very concerning for an event like the Olympics, which is being held in a major-scale. Once again, we cannot afford an another bloodied tragedy similar to the Olympic Village massacre during Munich 1972; where 11 members of the Israeli team were killed, and the bombings during Atlanta 1996; in which one person was perished (another person later died of a heart attack), and 111 others were injured at Centennial Park.

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17 hours ago, @SportNow786542 said:

To us, as Olympic fans, that sentiment against the Games and even the IOC are truly a new breed of cancel culture. We don't want money and politics to be surrounded everywhere before and during the Olympics, and that's because diversity and tranquility through sport is more independent from both. For those who were 'Anti-Olympic-ers', they've looked back to the Games' darker past, and once more because of what they are doing in an IOC virtual meeting last month, just as you said, they had acted too much in order to ruin its reputation.

What's new?  This happens every Olympics.  And there are plenty of salient points the anti-Olympics crowd brings up.  The IOC has done plenty to ruin their own reputation that you can hardly blame the media for calling them out for it.  They are a morally bankrupt organization that shouldn't be preaching to the rest of the world and like Stefan said, they're much more about money and politics and less about peace and tranquility through sport those days.  Yes, I would like for the Olympics to be celebrated in the spirit of peace and unity.  But that's a utopia that simply doesn't exist right now, let alone in the throes of a once in a century pandemic

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4 hours ago, @SportNow786542 said:

I hope that security in Tokyo would be much tighter during Games time, but turbulence in the host city was too very concerning for an event like the Olympics, which is being held in a major-scale. Once again, we cannot afford an another bloodied tragedy similar to the Olympic Village massacre during Munich 1972; where 11 members of the Israeli team were killed, and the bombings during Atlanta 1996; in which one person was perished (another person later died of a heart attack), and 111 others were injured at Centennial Park.

Eek, why would you even think that?  I have little concern that there will be any sort of incident at these games.  Protests will likely be contained (not a good look if Japan is protesting against COVID measures by gathering in large crowds).  The aftermath of these Olympics will tell the story.  If COVID cases and hospitalizations/deaths rise afterwards, that's a problem.  If not, then it will hopefully provide fodder that the Olympics, while risky, were not a danger to the world as many have been predicting

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5 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

I have little concern that there will be any sort of incident at these games.  Protests will likely be contained (not a good look if Japan is protesting against COVID measures by gathering in large crowds).  The aftermath of these Olympics will tell the story. If COVID cases and hospitalizations/deaths rise afterwards, that's a problem.  If not, then it will hopefully provide fodder that the Olympics, while risky, were not a danger to the world as many have been predicting.

Unless that's your opinion, quite though... But we hoped that everything would be safely and successfully settled in Tokyo once the Games leave town. Again, we know that Japan would pull this off despite this current situation, especially when it comes to excelling their innovation.

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5 hours ago, @SportNow786542 said:

Unless that's your opinion, quite though... But we hoped that everything would be safely and successfully settled in Tokyo once the Games leave town. Again, we know that Japan would pull this off despite this current situation, especially when it comes to excelling their innovation.

You know, we keep hearing about how great Japan is and that they're a good country to be put into this position because they can handle it, but look at the reality?  Japan is struggling with the virus.  Their population dislikes and distrusts country leadership.  So maybe some of this praise for Japan is a little misplaced.

Time will tell how this all went.  It'll all be based on the COVID numbers in the month or so following the Olympics.  If there's an uptick in cases and COVID deaths, the Olympics will undoubtedly get blamed.  So let's hope that Japan does in fact know what they're doing, because between the Tokyo organizers and the IOC, I'm less than convinced their safety protocols are as good as they need to be

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On 6/9/2021 at 6:55 AM, @SportNow786542 said:

To us, as Olympic fans, that sentiment against the Games and even the IOC are truly a new breed of cancel culture. We don't want money and politics to be surrounded everywhere before and during the Olympics, and that's because diversity and tranquility through sport is more independent from both. For those who were 'Anti-Olympic-ers', they've looked back to the Games' darker past, and once more because of what they are doing in an IOC virtual meeting last month, just as you said, they had acted too much in order to ruin its reputation.

I consider myself a fan of the Olympics, but I wouldn't call any of the criticism "cancel culture." The IOC is a terrible steward for the Olympic movement, they're bad in a way that's only matched by FIFA. Even their "reforms" have been lots of talk, little substance. In the past there have been critical organizations and movements against the events when cities vie to host, I think it's likely that those will only grow. Unless the IOC really sits down and figures out that a lot of people really have beef with them, that can't just be swept away with a shiny video package. 

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17 hours ago, GoNutz said:

I consider myself a fan of the Olympics, but I wouldn't call any of the criticism "cancel culture." The IOC is a terrible steward for the Olympic movement, they're bad in a way that's only matched by FIFA. Even their "reforms" have been lots of talk, little substance. In the past there have been critical organizations and movements against the events when cities vie to host, I think it's likely that those will only grow. Unless the IOC really sits down and figures out that a lot of people really have beef with them, that can't just be swept away with a shiny video package. 

These "critical" organizations used violence and intimidation against people they didn't like, have you seen radical protestors at the 2008 and 2010 Olympics? 

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2 hours ago, WD96 said:

These "critical" organizations used violence and intimidation against people they didn't like, have you seen radical protestors at the 2008 and 2010 Olympics? 

Every Olympics has counter-protests.  Yes, some more serious than others.  For better or worse, they often have a valid point to make that there are negative consequence of the Olympics.  Which leads me to...

19 hours ago, GoNutz said:

I consider myself a fan of the Olympics, but I wouldn't call any of the criticism "cancel culture." The IOC is a terrible steward for the Olympic movement, they're bad in a way that's only matched by FIFA. Even their "reforms" have been lots of talk, little substance. In the past there have been critical organizations and movements against the events when cities vie to host, I think it's likely that those will only grow. Unless the IOC really sits down and figures out that a lot of people really have beef with them, that can't just be swept away with a shiny video package. 

You got that right.  And yes, between Japan hosting an Olympics during a pandemic that their citizens are now opposed to and China having been awarded an Olympics, the animosity against Olympic hosting is going to increase.  Pile on top of that what's happening with Brisbane and the IOC's reputation is going to tumble even further.  The legacy of Thomas Bach is probably not going to be a good one because he was preaching change and transparency and yet here we are with probably the least transparent process imaginable.

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2 hours ago, Quaker2001 said:

The legacy of Thomas Bach is probably not going to be a good one because he was preaching change and transparency and yet here we are with probably the least transparent process imaginable.

That does not come as a surprise to someone who’s been following his career progression from a home view.

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34 minutes ago, StefanMUC said:

That does not come as a surprise to someone who’s been following his career progression from a home view.

Actions speak louder than words.  Their words indicate they are interested in reform and change.  Their actions indicate they're not interested in either of those things.  And that will be the legacy of this administration of the IOC

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56 minutes ago, Quaker2001 said:

Actions speak louder than words.  Their words indicate they are interested in reform and change.  Their actions indicate they're not interested in either of those things.  And that will be the legacy of this administration of the IOC

Are there any instances where an IOC president's legacy was viewed as negatively? I do know Juan Antonio Samaranch's may had been viewed negatively.

 
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1 hour ago, WD96 said:

Are there any instances where an IOC president's legacy was viewed as negatively? I do know Juan Antonio Samaranch's may had been viewed negatively.

 

American - Avery Brundage (1952-1972). 

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3 hours ago, WD96 said:

Are there any instances where an IOC president's legacy was viewed as negatively? I do know Juan Antonio Samaranch's may had been viewed negatively.

 

I don't see Samaranch in that negative a light, any more so than any other IOC president.  He did after all open the Games up to professionals and helped to get rid of all the amateur restrictions on athletes.  But he turned a blind eye to corruption, especially the Salt Lake bidding scandal.  His appearance before the U.S. Congress in 1999 did not go swimmingly, as I recall.  It was quite embarrassing, and he hid behind it by speaking in Spanish.  .  

1 hour ago, FYI said:

American - Avery Brundage (1952-1972). 

As I often say, a very flawed man, who only saw what he wanted to see.  Hard to see any net positive from his reign, and his reputation only worsens over time.  We all know what he was, no need to rehash it here.  

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  • 2 weeks later...
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Spectators at Tokyo Olympic venues capped at 10,000
Sponsors, officials and students in a school program not counted as spectators

Olympic organizers on Monday decided on a spectator limit of 10,000, or up to 50% of capacity, per venue for domestic fans at the Games that open in just over a month.

The decision came after the government lifted the state of emergency in Tokyo and other prefectures on Sunday. Although a quasi-state of emergency will be in place in Tokyo, the spectator limit at large events is expected to lifted to 10,000 after the restriction is lifted on July 11. Currently, the upper limit is at 50% of capacity or 5,000 people.

Tokyo 2020 President Seiko Hashimoto told reporters that organizers will hold a meeting to consider steps such as banning spectators if there is any rapid increase in infections and the medical system comes under strain.

Currently, 3.64 million tickets have been sold. Organizers are aiming to cut the number to 2.72 million through a lottery, for which details will be unveiled later this week. "We will reduce the number of spectators in a fair manner," Tokyo 2020 CEO Toshiro Muto said.

Due to the spectator limit, ticket revenue will be "less than half" of the 90 billion yen ($819 million) it had originally expected, Muto added. He said Tokyo Metropolitan Government, the national government and Tokyo 2020 would discuss how to make up for the loss.

At all venues, those involved with the Games such as sponsors and officials of international sports federations will not be included in the numbers to be cut. "They are not spectators but they are one of the organizers," Muto said. Students in a schools' spectator program will be also exempted from the reduction -- 590,000 tickets have been sold through this program.

The opening ceremony will be attended by fewer than 20,000 people including spectators and those stakeholders.

Asked if the stakeholders will be allowed to attend should all the spectators are banned under the state of emergency, Muto did not provide a clear answer. "It is possible to think that they could be allowed to enter the venue because they are not spectators," Muto said. "We will consider it carefully when the games will be held behind closed doors," he added.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga told reporters on Monday that if a new state of emergency is declared during the games, it is possible they will be held behind closed doors. "When the declaration is needed, we will prioritize people's safety while flexibly considering banning spectators," Suga added.

Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike said before the meeting: "If there should be a major dramatic change in the infection situation, we need to revisit this among ourselves, and we may need to consider the option of having no spectators in the venues."

Organizers have waited until the last minute to decide on domestic spectators as "it has been difficult to judge the situation" as the infection status is changing all the time, Tokyo 2020 president Seiko Hashimoto told reporters last week.

Shigeru Omi, the government's top medical adviser on COVID-19, proposed to organizers on Friday that holding the Olympics behind closed doors is "desirable" to tame infection risks, claiming it was the least risky way to hold the games.

The remote meeting on Monday was attended by the Tokyo and national governments, Tokyo 2020, and the International Olympic and Paralympic Committee.

At the meeting, IOC president Thomas Bach said that "well above 80%" of athletes who will stay at the Olympic Village will be vaccinated, and "much closer to the 80%" of foreign journalists are expected to be vaccinated.

"We have also made it very clear to all the participants that whether vaccinated or not, that all the rules apply, always, to everybody," Bach added." We will continue to work together with you to ensure these safe and secure games... I can only say, here we go... and we are ready."

Date:June 21,2021

News source:Nikkei Asia

link to this article:https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Tokyo-2020-Olympics/Spectators-at-Tokyo-Olympic-venues-capped-at-10-000

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Tokyo organisers lean toward banning spectators from night events 

Tokyo Olympics organisers are leaning towards banning spectators from night-time events and large-scale venues, Japan’s Yomiuri newspaper reported on Friday, amid persistent worries about the spread of COVID-19 just three weeks before the Games begin.

Polls show a majority of Japanese oppose holding the Olympics given warnings from health experts that it could unleash another wave of infections. The Games are scheduled to start on July 23, after a year’s delay due to the pandemic.

The governors of Chiba and Saitama prefectures near Tokyo have already been urging organisers to ban spectators from night-time events in their localities.

Their request is being discussed and a decision will be made at five-way talks that will include the Tokyo governor, head of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), and the head of Tokyo 2020, Olympics Minister Tamayo Marukawa told reporters.

The talks will be held on July 8, Kyodo news agency said.

The government is also expected to make a call next week on whether to lift a state of “quasi-emergency” in Tokyo and other parts of the country.

Organisers have pledged to make the Games “safe and secure”, arguing other large sporting events have been held safely.

While they have banned overseas spectators, they have so far decided to cap the number of domestic spectators to 10,000 per venue for the Games, or 50% of capacity, despite medical experts saying no spectators would be the “least risky” option.

Brushing aside concerns the Olympics could become a “superspreader” event, Sebastian Coe, president of World Athletics and a member of the IOC, told CNBC on Thursday the Games “will go ahead and they should go ahead”.

But the Euro 2020 soccer tournament - which has been blamed this week for a surge in COVID-19 cases as fans flocked to stadiums, bars and spectator zones across Europe - is likely to further fuel worries in Japan.

The governor of Hokkaido in northern Japan has indicated he would prefer if people did not come to watch the marathon along its routes in the city of Sapporo and has asked organisers to come up with safety protocols.

Top government spokesman Katsunobu Kato, when asked about the remarks, said he would “monitor discussions” between organisers and local authorities.

Date:July 2,2021

News source:Reuters

Link to this article:https://www.reuters.com/article/olympics-2020/update-1-olympics-tokyo-organisers-lean-toward-banning-spectators-from-night-events-newspaper-idUSL2N2OE03A

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40% of Tokyo Olympics' sessions could be staged without spectators

About 40 percent of sessions, or time slots, of the Tokyo Olympics are expected to be held without spectators if the current attendance cap of 10,000 people per venue is lowered to 5,000 as part of precautions against a potential fresh wave of coronavirus infections, officials involved in the planning process said Saturday.

In the wake of a resurgence of COVID-19 cases in Tokyo, the organizing committee and the Japanese government are finding it increasingly difficult to stick to the 10,000-spectator cap and they have begun to look at an alternative.

The most likely option now on the table is to allow up to 5,000 local fans at each venue of the Olympics, due to begin July 23. The estimate of 40 percent is based on the assumption that all events with over 5,000 ticket holders and those taking place after 9 p.m. will be held behind closed doors, according to the officials.

Such events include the opening and closing ceremonies, as well as baseball, soccer and athletics. There are a total of 750 sessions and more than 300 of them will be staged without spectators if the revised cap is applied, said the officials of the organizers, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The organizers of the Tokyo Games, also including the metropolitan government, the International Olympic Committee and the International Paralympic Committee, made the unprecedented decision to bar spectators from overseas in March.

In an attempt to prevent the Olympics from becoming a global super-spreader event, the five organizers decided late last month that venues can be filled to 50 percent of capacity with a maximum of 10,000 domestic spectators, while agreeing that the ceiling will be reviewed if the coronavirus pandemic situation worsens.

The 10,000-attendance cap was set on the premise that the ongoing quasi-state of emergency in Tokyo will be lifted.

Under the emergency, the number of people allowed at sports and other big events is restricted to 50 percent of venue capacity with an upper limit of 5,000 people.

Daily COVID-19 cases in Tokyo have been rebounding since a state of emergency was lifted after about two months, and the government appears to have no choice but to extend the current quasi-state of emergency that is set to expire on July 11.

If the government decides on the extension, representatives of the five organizers could hold a meeting as early as next Thursday to discuss what to do with the spectator cap.

While a number of influential medical experts have warned of a surge in infections before and after the start of the Olympics, there are also some officials of the organizers who have pushed for a blanket no-spectator option.

"It will be better to have no spectators from the beginning than to switch to no spectators after a state of emergency is declared during the games," one of the officials said.

Date:July 4,2021

News source: Kyodo News

Link to this article:https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2021/07/de729439cff5-40-of-tokyo-olympics-sessions-could-be-staged-without-spectators.html

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